NPR Politics Podcast

NPR's senior political editor discusses covering the current presidential primary,  the role of the media in political coverage and what makes this 2020 election season unique. How do reporters decide what to cover with such a large field of primary candidates? And voters, how are you keeping up...or are you checking out? 

Todd Bookman / NHPR

Joe Biden was under scrutiny for a report that a war story he recounted on the campaign trail was riddled with inaccuracies. As he sat for an interview earlier this week, he responded, "The details are irrelevant in terms of decision-making."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Former congressman Beto O'Rourke of Texas took a break from the campaign trail earlier this month to spend time in his home town of El Paso, where a gunman shot and killed 22 people at a Walmart. When he resumed campaigning, he did so with a sharper tone, and one directed at President Trump.

Ali Oshinskie for NHPR

Andrew Yang, who may be best known for his "Freedom Dividend," describes himself as an entrepreneur, an optimist, and an "Asian man who likes math" — that last one being a standard campaign quip.

The Democratic presidential hopeful outlined his ideas in an interview with the NPR Politics Podcast and New Hampshire Public Radio. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, the former law professor and consumer advocate from Cambridge, Mass., has long talked about fighting for progressive reform, everything from tax policy more supportive of the middle class to gun safety.

As she campaigned around Iowa, a sign on the side of her RV reads, "Honk if you want big structural change." It was a good start to a conversation with the NPR Politics Podcast, in a series partnership with Iowa Public Radio and New Hampshire Public Radio.  

Jason Moon / NHPR

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, the former mayor of San Antonio, Texas, was on the short-list to be Hillary Clinton's running mate four years ago. He is working to position himself as a candidate suited to challenge President Trump.

"What he's trying to do is, he's trying to split people along racial, and ethnic and religious lines. His specialty, if you will, in politics is division.  Trying to just amp up a base. He's the biggest identity politician that we've had over the last 50 years."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a former prosecutor, says she will not release a draft list of prospective judges whom she would nominate, if elected President.

"I think that you interview people, you make decisions -- you can't do that as a candidate," she said. "You can't vet them like you should. As a candidate you don't have the FBI."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Tulsi Gabbard, a congresswoman who has served two tours in the Middle East with the Hawaii Army National Guard, has emerged as the most vocal isolationist candidate in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. 

America should "stop trying to act as the policeman of the world," she said in an interview with the NPR Politics Podcast and New Hampshire Public Radio.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders says Democrats need a nominee who can engage and excite voters in 2020, from young people to the working class. 

"You're not going to have that turnout unless the candidate has issues that excite people, that energize people," he said in an interview with the NPR Politics Podcast and New Hampshire Public Radio.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock was one of the last Democrats to enter the presidential race. He says his resume, that of a Democrat able to win in a state won by Donald Trump in 2016, should be a key item for voters to consider.

"When you look at a field of 24, I'm the only one that won a Trump state," he tells the NPR Politics Podcast, in an episode produced in collaboration with Iowa Public Radio and New Hampshire Public Radio.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

If elected President, Sen. Kamala Harris says her administration would pursue obstruction of justice charges against a former President Donald Trump.

"I believe that they would have no choice and that they should, yes," Harris said in an interview with the NPR Politics Podcast and Iowa Public Radio. The candidate series is produced in collaboration with New Hampshire Public Radio.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg says his generation is positioned to find and to build unity through diversity. The 37-year-old military veteran, who is a two-term mayor of South Bend, Ind., often speaks on the campaign trail about his faith and his marriage to his husband, Chasten. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker believes Americans will be more open to finding common ground in 2020 — in large part — because of President Donald Trump.

"He's using the highest office in this land to commit act after act of moral vandalism, to do things to divide, demean, and degrade us, and he is doing great in the politics of pinning Americans against each other."