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NH Supreme Court

School Funding: A New Lawsuit and COVID-19

Sep 28, 2020
Three students sit at desks completing worksheets.
The City Journal

Though it has been the subject of debate for decades, school funding is back in the limelight in New Hampshire. The state Supreme Court heard oral arguments last week after four districts sued the state for not funding an adequate education for students. We examine the history and nuances of this discussion and explore how the issue is complicated by COVID-19. 

Air date: Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. 

Find all of our coverage and share your experiences with NHPR's COVID & The Classroom.

Ken Watson / KenWatson.net

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del jueves 17 de septiembre.  

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Trabajadores electorales piden ajustes en procesos de emission de papeletas de votos ausente

Los trabajadores electorales dijeron que las recientes elecciones primarias fluyeron bien a pesar de la cantidad de cambios que se realizaron por el COVID-19. 

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has agreed to hear a community group’s appeal in a dispute over an environmental protection ordinance in Nottingham, temporarily halting a lower court lawsuit against the rule.

The case comes from a citizen group, the Nottingham Water Association, which wants to intervene in an ongoing Superior Court challenge to their town’s freedom from chemical trespass” ordinance.

Teatotaller / via Instagram

A Somersworth café has won its state Supreme Court challenge against Facebook, in a unanimous ruling Friday that sends the contract dispute back to a district court.

Emmett Soldati, owner of the Teatotaller café, challenged Facebook in Dover’s small claims court, saying he was owed damages after the company deleted the café’s Instagram account in 2018.

Joe Gratz / flickr, creative commons: https://www.flickr.com/photos/63126465@N00/117048243

A decision by the New Hampshire Supreme Court on how the state funds public education is expected by the end of the year. The court’s decision will be the latest chapter in the decades-long battle over how the state funds its schools.

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Annie Ropeik / NHPR

An environmental group in Nottingham is appealing to the New Hampshire Supreme Court to try to get involved in an ongoing legal battle over community rights. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on whether the legislature can ban firearms from Representatives Hall at the State House.

The ban has been a partisan issue that's varied over the years as the makeup of the House has shifted. It was reinstated last year by the current Democratic majority, under House Speaker Steve Shurtleff.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The state Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a contract dispute between a local business and the social media giant Facebook.

The case centers on the Instagram account of Teatotaller, a Somersworth cafe owned by Emmett Soldati.

Soldati, who’s also running for Executive Council, represented himself in the appeal. He says Instagram – which is owned by Facebook – unfairly deleted his paid business account in 2018.

Teatotaller / via Instagram

The New Hampshire Supreme Court hears oral arguments Tuesday in a dispute between Facebook and a Seacoast coffee shop.

Emmett Soldati owns Teatotaller in Somersworth. He's suing Facebook for, he says, unfairly deleting his cafe's Instagram account in 2018.

Soldati, who is also running for Executive Council, argues that Facebook's terms of use directed him to take the case to a local small claims court.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

A woman who gained international notoriety after police seized 75 purebred Great Danes from her home in 2017 is accusing a non-profit of improperly trying to profit from her case.

Christina Fay’s arrest made global headlines due to the size and scale of the allegations, coupled with dramatic images of giant dogs living inside a filthy mansion set on 53 acres. She was ultimately found guilty of 17 counts of animal cruelty by a jury in Superior Court.

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

The owner of the Teatotaller café in Somersworth is taking on Facebook at the New Hampshire Supreme Court.

The colorful coffee shop, a self-styled “queer hipster oasis,” routinely hosts everything from teen drag shows to presidential campaign stops.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

A former state employee fired for what she alleges was hostility over a request for breastfeeding accommodation argued her case before the Supreme Court of New Hampshire on Tuesday. 

The case has been winding its way through both federal and state courts for more than six years. Kate Frederick, who now resides in Vermont, alleges she was fired from her position at the Department of Health and Human Services in September 2012.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

There appears to be little progress being made in a six-month long partisan stalemate over filling a vacancy on the New Hampshire Supreme Court.

NHPR Staff

In 1993, the New Hampshire Supreme Court ruled that public employee personnel records, including disciplinary records, are exempt from disclosure under the state’s Right to Know law. 

More than 25 years later, that decision, known as Union Leader v. Fenniman, is back under the microscope.


JOE GRATZ / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

As lawmakers and law enforcement consider potential changes to the state's bail system, New Hampshire's courts are also deciding how to interpret the existing bail reform law.

The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in the case State vs. Christina A. Hill at Windham High School.

Students were invited to watch the hearing as part of the court’s “On the Road” series.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 6, 2019

Sep 5, 2019

Students are back at school and we focus on education issues. The N.H. Supreme Court is asked once again to weigh in on school funding. In Concord, the school board considers a petition to remove two administrators for how they handled allegations of sexual assault and inappropriate behavior by former teacher, Howie Leung.  We find out why the Manchester Police Department says it is losing confidence in Hillsborough County Attorney Michael Conlon.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Defendants in a case over school funding in New Hampshire want the state Supreme Court to take up their case.

The Attorney General's office filed an appeal Wednesday with the Supreme Court on behalf of the state, Governor Chris Sununu, the New Hampshire Department of Education and Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut.

NHPR Staff

It's been seven weeks since the Executive Council voted on party lines to reject Governor Sununu's nomination of Attorney General Gordon MacDonald to be Chief Justice of New Hampshire's Supreme Court. And councilors say Governor Sununu hasn't indicated his plan to fill the vacancy to lead what is now a four member court.

Britta Greene / NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has denied a request by the New Hampshire Attorney General's office to release records about its investigation into a high-profile alleged racially-motivated attack in Claremont two years ago.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 19, 2019

Jul 19, 2019

The governor signs a bill into law to protect New Hampshire children from discrimination at school. He also signed into law a bill requiring public schools to provide tampons or pads in all gender neutral and female restrooms. We discuss the controversy in Newington over Pride Month lawn signs. And the Supreme Court releases its decision on the Northern Pass appeal of the denial of its $1.6 billion high-transmission power line project.

GUESTS: 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 12, 2019

Jul 11, 2019

The Executive Council shoots down the nomination of Attorney General Gordon McDonald to the New Hampshire Supreme Court. Two-thirds of Medicaid recipients in New Hampshire failed to comply with the new work requirement, prompting a delay of the penalties; the Concord School Board examines how it handles allegations of sexual abuse. 

GUESTS:

  • Ethan DeWitt - Concord Monitor statehouse reporter.
  • Sarah Gibson - NHPR Reporter.
  • Jason Moon - NHPR Reporter.
  • James Pindell – Political reporter for The Boston Globe.
  • Dean Spiliotes - Civic scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at SNHU.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

New Hampshire Attorney General Gordon MacDonald faced sharp questions from Democrats during his Executive Council confirmation hearing to become the state's next supreme court Chief Justice.

But he also had strong backing from New Hampshire's legal community. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday in Eversource's bid to revive its Northern Pass transmission line.

The justices are considering whether the proposal – a nearly 200-mile high-voltage power line to bring Canadian hydropower through the White Mountains to New England – should get a new hearing with the state Site Evaluation Committee, or SEC.

Eversource

Opponents of a new Eversource transmission line on the Seacoast are asking the state Supreme Court to review the project, even as construction gets underway.

The Conservation Law Foundation and residents of Durham filed appeals Monday on the Site Evaluation Committee's decision last December to let construction of the “Seacoast Reliability Project” proceed.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

 

New Hampshire's Supreme Court has reversed a judge's decision requiring prosecutors to provide a photo lineup for a defendant in a trespassing case.

The defendant in the Lebanon case said requiring the alleged victim to attend a pretrial deposition and identify a suspect from photos would ensure a fair trial. Prosecutors would supply booking photos, from which the defense would create a lineup for the alleged victim to choose from. Prosecutors objected to having to provide the photos.

New Hampshire like every other state has its own Supreme Court. It’s not the all-powerful arbiter of justice that the name would imply. A primer on the New Hampshire Surpreme Court from Civics 101: NH. Then, the controversial start to our Constitution.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

A group of wood-burning power plants wants the New Hampshire Supreme Court to intervene in a dispute over a controversial new state law.

The law, in part, would require Eversource to buy power from the state’s biomass plants at a discounted rate for three years.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

New Hampshire's Supreme Court has upheld the first-degree murder conviction of a man who was sentenced to life imprisonment in the death of an 11-month-old boy in 2015.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has sided with online travel websites in a dispute over collection of the state's rooms and meals tax.

The state sued Expedia, Priceline, Orbitz and Travelocity in hopes of recovering hundreds of thousands of dollars it claims it is owed because it collects taxes only on the lower, wholesale rate the companies pay hotels instead of the higher, retail price they charge consumers.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has ruled that a labor appeals board was wrong to determine that workers' compensation insurance can't reimburse an employee for the cost of medical marijuana.

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