NH Supreme Court

JOE GRATZ / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

As lawmakers and law enforcement consider potential changes to the state's bail system, New Hampshire's courts are also deciding how to interpret the existing bail reform law.

The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in the case State vs. Christina A. Hill at Windham High School.

Students were invited to watch the hearing as part of the court’s “On the Road” series.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 6, 2019

Sep 5, 2019

Students are back at school and we focus on education issues. The N.H. Supreme Court is asked once again to weigh in on school funding. In Concord, the school board considers a petition to remove two administrators for how they handled allegations of sexual assault and inappropriate behavior by former teacher, Howie Leung.  We find out why the Manchester Police Department says it is losing confidence in Hillsborough County Attorney Michael Conlon.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Defendants in a case over school funding in New Hampshire want the state Supreme Court to take up their case.

The Attorney General's office filed an appeal Wednesday with the Supreme Court on behalf of the state, Governor Chris Sununu, the New Hampshire Department of Education and Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut.

NHPR Staff

It's been seven weeks since the Executive Council voted on party lines to reject Governor Sununu's nomination of Attorney General Gordon MacDonald to be Chief Justice of New Hampshire's Supreme Court. And councilors say Governor Sununu hasn't indicated his plan to fill the vacancy to lead what is now a four member court.

Britta Greene / NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has denied a request by the New Hampshire Attorney General's office to release records about its investigation into a high-profile alleged racially-motivated attack in Claremont two years ago.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 19, 2019

Jul 19, 2019

The governor signs a bill into law to protect New Hampshire children from discrimination at school. He also signed into law a bill requiring public schools to provide tampons or pads in all gender neutral and female restrooms. We discuss the controversy in Newington over Pride Month lawn signs. And the Supreme Court releases its decision on the Northern Pass appeal of the denial of its $1.6 billion high-transmission power line project.

GUESTS: 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 12, 2019

Jul 11, 2019

The Executive Council shoots down the nomination of Attorney General Gordon McDonald to the New Hampshire Supreme Court. Two-thirds of Medicaid recipients in New Hampshire failed to comply with the new work requirement, prompting a delay of the penalties; the Concord School Board examines how it handles allegations of sexual abuse. 

GUESTS:

  • Ethan DeWitt - Concord Monitor statehouse reporter.
  • Sarah Gibson - NHPR Reporter.
  • Jason Moon - NHPR Reporter.
  • James Pindell – Political reporter for The Boston Globe.
  • Dean Spiliotes - Civic scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at SNHU.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

New Hampshire Attorney General Gordon MacDonald faced sharp questions from Democrats during his Executive Council confirmation hearing to become the state's next supreme court Chief Justice.

But he also had strong backing from New Hampshire's legal community. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday in Eversource's bid to revive its Northern Pass transmission line.

The justices are considering whether the proposal – a nearly 200-mile high-voltage power line to bring Canadian hydropower through the White Mountains to New England – should get a new hearing with the state Site Evaluation Committee, or SEC.

Eversource

Opponents of a new Eversource transmission line on the Seacoast are asking the state Supreme Court to review the project, even as construction gets underway.

The Conservation Law Foundation and residents of Durham filed appeals Monday on the Site Evaluation Committee's decision last December to let construction of the “Seacoast Reliability Project” proceed.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

 

New Hampshire's Supreme Court has reversed a judge's decision requiring prosecutors to provide a photo lineup for a defendant in a trespassing case.

The defendant in the Lebanon case said requiring the alleged victim to attend a pretrial deposition and identify a suspect from photos would ensure a fair trial. Prosecutors would supply booking photos, from which the defense would create a lineup for the alleged victim to choose from. Prosecutors objected to having to provide the photos.

New Hampshire like every other state has its own Supreme Court. It’s not the all-powerful arbiter of justice that the name would imply. A primer on the New Hampshire Surpreme Court from Civics 101: NH. Then, the controversial start to our Constitution.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

A group of wood-burning power plants wants the New Hampshire Supreme Court to intervene in a dispute over a controversial new state law.

The law, in part, would require Eversource to buy power from the state’s biomass plants at a discounted rate for three years.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

New Hampshire's Supreme Court has upheld the first-degree murder conviction of a man who was sentenced to life imprisonment in the death of an 11-month-old boy in 2015.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has sided with online travel websites in a dispute over collection of the state's rooms and meals tax.

The state sued Expedia, Priceline, Orbitz and Travelocity in hopes of recovering hundreds of thousands of dollars it claims it is owed because it collects taxes only on the lower, wholesale rate the companies pay hotels instead of the higher, retail price they charge consumers.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has ruled that a labor appeals board was wrong to determine that workers' compensation insurance can't reimburse an employee for the cost of medical marijuana.

Allegra Boverman

The New Hampshire Supreme Court says a new law that prevents the state's voter database from being subpoenaed as evidence in ongoing lawsuits is valid — which means it can also apply to a case that started before that new prohibition went into effect.

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

Indigent defendants who fail to pay fees assessed for their public defender cannot be jailed without adequate due process, including representation by an attorney. That’s according to an unanimous ruling released on Tuesday by the Supreme Court of New Hampshire in a case involving an indigent defendant who failed to repay approximately $450 owed to the state.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The New Hampshire Supreme Court in Concord was recently among 10 properties added to the N.H. State Register of Historic Places. The Supreme Court is a symmetrical Georgian Colonial Revival building with a steel-and-concrete block frame and brick exterior. The interior features green and white marble floors.  

Post from RICOH THETA. - Spherical Image - RICOH THETA

Chris Jensen / NHPR

Several groups are asking the state Supreme Court to uphold regulators' denial of the Northern Pass project.

Towns and nonprofits that oppose the transmission line proposal filed their motions with the high court Thursday.

(Read one of the motions, filed by the McKenna's Purchase development that abuts the project route.)

Todd Bookman / NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court on Tuesday expanded the circumstances under which someone over age 18 can be adopted while still maintaining a legal relationship with a biological parent.

The case involved an unmarried man seeking to adopt a woman. A lower court ruled against him, saying it would only approve the adoption if the woman terminated her legal relationship with her mother and the man adopted her "as a single parent who will be the only parent after adoption."

Flikr Creative Commons / Claudio Schwarz

New Hampshire's largest utility hopes regulators will revisit two big energy proposals – one dealing with natural gas and the other with Northern Pass – in the wake of a recent state Supreme Court decision.

The utility's filings this week seek to revive two 2016 cases where the Public Utilities Commission applied a view of the state law restructuring the electric industry that the Supreme Court overturned in May.

Consumer Energy / Flicker CC

The New Hampshire Supreme Court says electric utilities like Eversource should be allowed to invest in natural gas pipelines.

Tuesday’s ruling reverses a 2016 order by the state Public Utilities Commission.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Patrick Donovan is an Ivy League graduate, a standout football player, and a successful private practice attorney. You’d never hear him say that, though.

During his swearing in ceremony on Tuesday in Concord, the 54-year old was praised by colleagues in the legal community for his modesty, work ethic, and temperament.

“He questions incisively, he reasons logically, and he analyzes precisely,” said Judge Joseph LaPlante. “He speaks persuasively, but more important than all of these, Patrick listens carefully.”

NHPR File Photo

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court says a labor relations board was wrong to dismiss a union complaint saying the Community College System of New Hampshire should have compensated an adjunct professor for tutoring.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Surrounded by family and friends, Robert Lynn was sworn in as Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Supreme Court on Monday.

After being tapped for the job by Governor Chris Sununu, the Windham resident sailed through his confirmation hearing in the New Hampshire Executive Council. He becomes the 36th Chief Justice in the state’s history, taking over for Linda Dalianis, who reached the mandatory retirement age of 70.

Lynn, who is 68, will serve less than two years in the role.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 9, 2018

Feb 8, 2018

A  New Hampshire woman won $560 million in the Powerball lottery, and now she is fighting in court to stay anonymous.  Governor Sununu nominates Robert J. Lynn for Chief Justice of the State Supreme Court.  The wife of the state education commissioner urges lawmakers to oppose a bill that would ban gay conversion therapy. F or the first time in nearly a decade, New Hampshire legislators are debating seat belt requirements.  And we'll see plenty of Olympic hopefuls from New Hampshire as the Winter Olympics get underway in South Korea. 

Sununu to Nominate Lynn for Supreme Court Chief Justice

Feb 6, 2018
N.H. Supreme Court

Governor Chris Sununu has nominated Justice Robert J. Lynn to lead the state's Supreme Court.

N.H. Judges Could Soon Serve Longer on the Bench

Dec 27, 2017
JOE GRATZ / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Judges in New Hampshire may soon get a few more years on the bench.

Courtesy of the N.H. Supreme Court

Linda Dalianis, the head of New Hampshire’s highest court, is stepping down after nearly eight years on the job.

Many in the state’s legal community say she’ll leave a lot to be remembered by after almost four decades as a judge.

Pages