NH Lottery

New Hampshire's first Mega Millions jackpot winner has claimed a $168 million prize from a drawing in July.

The winner of the July 23 drawing claimed the prize through the Just as B4 Nominee Trust of 2019, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

The winner, who purchased the jackpot winning ticket at the Brookside Market & Deli in Exeter for the drawing, chose the one-time cash prize of $108.5 million. The market received $75,000 for selling the winning ticket.

The Mega Millions drawing results from July 23 were: 1-4-23-40-45 MB-11.

Baishampayan Ghose via Wikimedia Commons

The Lottery Commission is sifting through more than a dozen bids from vendors looking to manage sports gambling in New Hampshire.

State officials announced Monday that it received 13 responses to its request for proposal to oversee both online and in-person sports wagering.

The legislature approved sports gambling earlier this year, greenlighting up to 10 physical locations around the state. Similar to the rollout of Keno, municipalities will need to get approval of local voters before any facilities can start taking bets. 

NHLottery.com

The Justice Department is planning to challenge a federal judge's ruling that a law prohibiting interstate wagering applies only to sports gambling, renewing the dispute over whether it's illegal to states like New Hampshire to sell lottery tickets online.

The department filed notice Friday with the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Lottery is looking for proposals from potential online vendors and retailers to offer sports betting after it became legal last month.

Republican Gov. Chris Sununu signed a law that legalizes betting on professional sports and most Division I college sports, excluding games involving New Hampshire schools.

Mobile betting and retail gambling at 10 locations will be allowed, though it will take some time to set up. The wagering is expected to produce an estimated $7.5 million for education in fiscal year 2021 and $13.5 million two years later.

The New Hampshire Lottery Commission is celebrating Monday’s victory in a lawsuit against the Trump Administration over the legality of online lottery sales.

The case centers on a surprise opinion released by the Office of Legal Counsel in November 2018 that said online lottery ticket sales violated the 1961 Wire Act. That opinion reversed a 2011 memo that cleared the way for online lottery sales.

NH Lottery

 

A growing number of states are moving to allow the winners of big lottery jackpots to stay anonymous as privacy concerns are increasingly trumping lottery groups' wishes to publicize winners to boost sales and show that the games are fair.

Arizona could be the next state to join at least nine others with laws that let winners keep their names secret under a proposal headed to Republican Gov. Doug Ducey. Four years ago, just five states allowed anonymous winners, and a handful of others allowed trusts to claim prizes.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

A federal judge has turned down a request by the U.S. Department of Justice to dismiss a lawsuit brought the New Hampshire Lottery Commission.

Thursday’s ruling comes in a case that centers on a surprise opinion released by the DOJ in November 2018 that could have broad implications for all lottery games.

NHPR File Photo

The state's top lottery official is warning lawmakers that New Hampshire could lose millions if it doesn't prevail in its lawsuit against the federal government. 

The issue hinges on a new interpretation of the federal wire act.

The New Hampshire Lottery Commission is suing the Trump Administration over its ability to sell lottery tickets online.

In 2011, the U.S. Department of Justice issued an opion clearing  the way for online sale of tickets.

Since then, eight states have launched online sales, including New Hampshire, which did so last September. The Lottery Commission says it expects to sell as much as $6 million worth of scratch off and “draw games” such as Mega Millions during the current fiscal year over the internet.

The New Hampshire Lottery is exploring legal action after a decision by the Trump administration that would make selling lottery tickets online illegal.

 

The state started selling virtual lottery tickets online in September of 2018, after it was approved in the last legislative session.

 

In that time, it's generated approximately $1.8 million net for the state from web sales.

 

 

Someone who bought a Mega Millions ticket in New Hampshire came closer than most to winning the $1 billion prize.

They matched five of the six numbers in Friday's drawing with a ticket now worth $1 million.

[Mega Millions Jackpot Soars to $1.6 Billion]

NHPR Photo

No one hit the Mega Millions jackpot Friday night. With the rollover, the jackpot has soared to $1.6 billion.

The next drawing is Tuesday.

The numbers drawn last night: 

15-23-53-65-70-7.  

___________ 

An Friday post continues below here:

With tonight's Mega Millions jackpot now at $1 billion, the New Hampshire Lottery expects each of its 1,400 retailers on average  to soon be selling three or four tickets a minute.

 

Courtesy of the N.H. Lottery Commission

The electronic gambling game Keno was approved by roughly three-quarters of the towns that voted on it last week.

The state Lottery Commission says 55 out of 71 towns approved Keno on Town Meeting day.

State lawmakers legalized the game last year as a way to raise money for full-day kindergarten, but left it up to individual communities to decide whether to allow it.

Charlie McIntyre, executive director of the state Lottery, says he’s pleased by the number of towns that approved Keno.

The state Lottery Commission says it won’t appeal a court decision that allowed the winner of a half-billion dollar Powerball jackpot to remain anonymous.

The Lottery Commission and the anonymous winner, identified only as Jane Doe, had been at odds over whether a lottery winner’s name was subject to right-to-know laws.

Last week, a Hillsboro Superior Court judge ruled in favor of the lottery winner -- meaning her identity will remain a mystery.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

Jane Doe will remain Jane Doe.

In a ruling that could shift legal precedent in New Hampshire, a Superior Court judge has declared that the identity of a woman who won a $560 million Powerball jackpot cannot be disclosed by the state Lottery Commission, citing “an invasion of privacy.”

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Representatives for the New Hampshire woman who won a half-billion dollar Powerball jackpot will claim the prize on Wednesday.

The winner, however, won’t be present.

Identified only as Jane Doe in court paperwork, she’s asking a judge to let her remain anonymous despite having already signed the back of the $559 million Powerball jackpot ticket. 

The New Hampshire Lottery Commission says it will allow the lottery winner who wants to remain anonymous to start collecting some of her $560 million jackpot, while she awaits a court’s ruling on whether her identity is a matter of public record.

 

In a motion filed Thursday, the lottery commission said it would allow the woman to designate a trust that could collect the money on her behalf — as long as someone brings her winning ticket, photo ID and social security number to a secure location so state officials can make sure she’s eligible. 

  

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 16, 2018

Feb 15, 2018

We parse the Governor's State of the State address for what it might tell us about his agenda for the state in 2018.  EPA chief Scott Pruitt jets into New Hampshire to meet privately about water contamination.  NHPR's Todd Bookman  unpacks allegations made against the NH Liquor Commission. And we follow up on the court battle over the lottery ticket that's been called the "most valuable piece of paper on Earth."  

GUESTS:  

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Lawyers representing the New Hampshire woman who won $560 million playing Powerball were in court on Tuesday, asking a Superior Court judge to let her name be kept secret, despite her having already signed the back of the ticket.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

Lawyers for a New Hampshire woman who won a $560 million Powerball game drawing in January 2018 went to court to remain anonymous. She signed the back of her ticket, which means her identity will be public under state law, according to the New Hampshire Lottery.

UPDATE, March 12, 2018: Judge Rules Powerball winner 'Jane Doe' Can Remain Anonymous

Todd Bookman/NHPR

On Tuesday, a  New Hampshire woman will ask a Superior Court judge to let her cross her name off the back of a $560-million winning lottery ticket. It’s not that she doesn’t want the money. It’s what comes with the sudden wealth that she’s trying to avoid.

The single winning Powerball ticket for the January 6th drawing—the seventh largest prize in U.S. history—was sold at Reeds Ferry Market in Merrimack. But rather than come forward and claim her prize, the winner instead has filed a lawsuit requesting that she get to stay out of the spotlight.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The state Attorney General’s office says disclosing the name of lottery winners in New Hampshire “is not something done for the sake of curiosity or sales promotion,” but instead is a crucial step to ensure the Lottery Commission operates with integrity and accountability.

A Superior Court judge will hear argument next Tuesday in the case of a New Hampshire woman who wishes to remain anonymous after winning a $560 million lottery jackpot.

[You can read NHPR’s previous coverage of this story here.]

A woman who says she has the lone Powerball ticket sold in New Hampshire that matched all six numbers for a $559.7 million jackpot wants a court order allowing her to stay anonymous. 

"Jane Doe" filed a complaint last week in Hillsborough Superior Court in Nashua saying she signed the back of the ticket following the Jan. 6 drawing. She contacted a lawyer and learned that if she had written the name of a trust, instead, she could've shielded her identity. 

The New Hampshire resident says she made a "huge mistake." She hasn't turned in the ticket yet. 

N.H. Keno Sales Top One Million Dollars

Jan 30, 2018
Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Keno sales in New Hampshire have topped $1 million in just over a month.

Keno in N.H. Starts Friday, Lottery Plans Rollout

Dec 14, 2017
AP

  The electronic bingo game Keno can be officially played in New Hampshire, as of Friday.

NHPR File

New Hampshire Lottery Director Charlie McIntyre says Granite Staters currently spend about $25 million a year playing keno in Massachusetts.

That is one reason the state is upbeat about a new law that gives cities and towns the option to allow keno gambling. A projected $9 million in revenue will help fund full-day kindergarten.

Voters in eleven cities will weigh that ballot question this fall. But not everyone is so gung-ho about it.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

Budget writers in the N.H. House are eyeing the lottery game Keno as a way to fund full day kindergarten. The state senate has always opposed Keno and Governor Sununu says he's yet to see the details of the plan.

These days lotteries are everywhere. Walk into most convenience stores and you’ll see scratch tickets on sale. Big Powerball payouts stretching across state lines make headlines, but fifty years ago the idea that lotteries were sinful and contributed to society’s moral decay was more widespread than it is today.

You may be surprised to learn that in the 1960s New Hampshire was the first state to launch a legal lottery. It came after a fight involving politicians of opposing sides, religious moralists, mob members, and the FBI.

NH Lottery

  The New Hampshire Lottery is selling a bacon-scented scratch ticket.

The I Heart Bacon Scratch ticket features a $1,000 dollar grand prize and ink which releases the a bacon-like aroma when scratched.

To publicize the release of the ticket, the Lottery will be giving out free bacon in Keene, Durham, Hooksett and Manchester starting on Friday.

The tickets cost $1 a piece and winning tickets will reveal either a heart or a bacon symbol.

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