NAACP

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Editor's note: This is the second story in a two-part series. Click here to read part one

We heard yesterday about a family who left the Hampton school district this past spring, saying school officials mishandled their daughter's reports that she was bullied for being black. 

Hampton administrators say they didn't break any rules. But for the past couple years, they've been trying to improve their policies around diversity and equity. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The national office of the NAACP will investigate recent incidents of alleged racism in Dover and Hampton public schools, according to local officials with the civil rights group.

Seacoast NAACP president Rogers Johnson said at their monthly branch meeting Monday night that the organization’s national leadership in Washington, D.C. is having him write up the details of each situation for further review.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 8, 2019

Feb 8, 2019

A bill to legalize recreational marijuana gets a hearing in Concord.  A seemingly routine request for a pay raise at the Executive Council became a tense discussion of the financial management of the state's Liquor Commission.  And Dover school officials stand by their decision to NOT fire a teacher at the center of a controversy over racist song lyrics. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Dover school officials say they won't heed renewed calls from regional NAACP leaders for a teacher at the center of a racist controversy to be fired.

Dover High School history teacher John Carver gave an assignment on the Reconstruction Era last fall that led students to sing a racist parody of Jingle Bells, including references to the KKK and murdering African-Americans.

Nashua NAACP Reactivated After Decade-Long Hiatus

Apr 13, 2017
Emily Corwin / NHPR

The Greater Nashua NAACP held its first open meeting in nearly a decade on Wednesday night.

Gloria Timmons founded the group in 2004, and has started it up again after a 10-year hiatus. She says she was motivated by what she called the increasingly hostile political environment. "Kids are being called names, the bullying, people are just saying horrible things to people on the street. All kinds of hideous things," Timmons said, are happening in Nashua and surrounding towns.

Allegra Boverman / Courtesy Photo

While they say there’s much more work to do, advocates and law enforcement officials alike say have some reason to be optimistic about the future of police-community relations in New Hampshire.

“The community as a whole is discussing things a lot more,” Portsmouth Police Chief David Mara said on Tuesday’s episode of The Exchange, which focused on the relationship between law enforcement and minorities. “People are talking a lot more.”

Justin Valas / Flickr CC

With controversy over police tactics in African-American communities and the slaying of black churchgoers in South Carolina, we check in with the new president of the Manchester branch of the country’s oldest civil rights organization, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.