Music | New Hampshire Public Radio

Music

NHPR Calendar of Virtual and Pandemic-oriented concerts, open mics, etc

July 13, 2020 edition

Daily (or every weekday)

Jud Caswell’s Morning Cordial Series ~ https://www.youtube.com/judcaswell or https://www.facebook.com/judcaswellmusic/playlist/429147271282854/ (see also his irregular, hour-long “Evening Cordial” home concert series.

Photo courtesy of the Soggy Po Boys

Dover-based band the Soggy Po Boys have a new album interpreting the classics of New Orleans jazz. The seven-member band has been bringing jazzy, funky tunes to audiences throughout New Hampshire and up and down the East Coast since 2012. The new album is called "All In Favor."

The band's singer, Stu Dias, sat down with All Things Considered host Peter Biello to discuss the album. 

More information on the Soggy Po Boys and their new album can be found at soggypoboys.com

Sara Plourde, NHPR

This show aired October 27th, 2019 and again October 31st, 2019..   

Songs of madness, murder ballads galore, and some mighty fine Devil's music... hosted by NHPR Producer Emily Quirk. 

You can listen to the full show, here:

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This show features a chat with Jake Brennan, podcast host and author of Disgraceland: Musicians Getting Away with Murder and Behaving Very Badly.**

Courtesy

The weather is starting to cool down in New Hampshire, which makes right now a great time to hear some music that calls to mind the beach and sunshine.

Certain towns in northern New Hampshire are becoming destinations for artists. But why? And can music fuel community development and growth?  

Jason Tors thinks so. He’s the owner and artist behind the Loading Dock in Littleton. It’s an unlikely space for music. 

“I was instantly attracted to it because it was super raw, had brick walls and exposed ceilings and felt like something that I would find in New York City or Brooklyn,” said Tors of the former newspaper storeroom that now houses his business.

Concord Musician Senie Hunt Releases First Studio Album

May 10, 2019
Peter Biello/NHPR

Concord based musician Senie Hunt will release his first studio album this weekend. The five track composition features Hunt’s impressive talents as a finger-style guitarist. Hunt frequently performs across the state, and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello in the studio to talk about his music.

Was it your family that introduced you to this kind of music?

Sara Plourde, NHPR

NHPR presents a one hour music special celebrating May Day, hosted by Producer Emily Quirk. 

We’ll examine American labor history through the lens of roots, blues, Americana, and rock genres spanning the last 100+ years.

This program aired on Friday, May 3 at 8 p.m. and on Sunday, May 5 at 6 p.m.

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Peter Biello/NHPR

Musician Snatam Kaur is preparing for the most high-profile performance of her career. This Sunday, the Wilton-based recording artist will take the stage at the 61st Grammy Awards ceremony.  Kaur will perform “Darashan Maago,” a song on her latest album Beloved, which is nominated for best album in the new age category.

On Beloved, sacred Sikh mantras are set to devotional music. Kaur’s parents embraced Sikhism when she was young, and she says that greatly influenced her career as a musician.

Brendan Hart

When 24-year-old Brendan Hart was a teenager, he spent a lot of time at a skatepark his hometown of Meredith. It was (and is) a special place for him, because it’s the Glenn Hart Memorial Skatepark, built in memory of his father.

 

NHPR’s Peter Biello picks up the story.

Peter Biello/NHPR

The novelist Willa Cather was born in Nebraska, but composed much of her most celebrated work, including My Ántonia, in New Hampshire.

She is buried in Jaffrey, New Hampshire and that's where this weekend fans of her work will gather to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the publication of My Ántonia.

USPS.

John Lennon will soon be on a Forever Stamp from the U.S. Postal Service.

This is the latest in a series of music icons to appear. 

The stamp artwork is based on a 1974 photo of Lennon taken by rock music photographer Bob Gruen for Lennon's "Walls and Bridges" album. 

The stamp resembles a vintage 45-rmp record sleeve. The reverse side has Lennon at his white piano, from a photo taken by Peter Fordham that was used to promote Lennon's landmark 1971 solo album, "Imagine."

The interlude is polished and playful.

“I have something very special coming up here. I just kind of have to set the stage .... we have a giraffe that’s going to be performing with us out here.”

The audience laughs away.

This is the opening of a song track on one of The Shaw Brothers’ records. They’re playing live at Prescott Park in Portsmouth. And if you’ve ever enjoyed a concert at the Prescott Park Arts Festival, you can just imagine the giraffe was either a prop or a set painting for a youth theater act that used the stage earlier.

Courtesy

Gretchen and the Pickpockets formed about six years ago while front-woman Gretchen Klempa was a student at the University of New Hampshire in Durham. Since then the band has been performing in and around the Granite State, pleasing crowds with mostly upbeat funky tunes enriched with lively horn hooks.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Think bagpipes, and you likely think Scotland. But one of the world’s largest bagpipe manufacturers happens to call Nashua, New Hampshire home.

That company, however, is facing an unexpected wrinkle in its international supply chain.

An Octopus Can Be Your Friend; Animal Minds, Where To Spot a Moose, And Liz Longley

Oct 13, 2017

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas and Sy Montgomery's 30-plus year friendship began with a ferret bite. Since then, the pair of New Hampshire-based naturalists and science writers have traveled together from Costa Rica to Tanzania.  

Their new book is called Tamed and Untamed, a collection of essays from their long-time Boston Globe column of the same name.  On this episode, Sy and Liz share scientific findings and personal viewpoints that argue the line between human and animal is blurrier than you might think. 

Also in this episode: Where to look for moose in New Hampshire, and singer-songwriter Liz Longley

Ben McLeod via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/2xMv5

On today's show: 

To the uninitiated, it's the French horn — though that's a bit of a misnomer. To its players and students, it's simply a horn, an instrument that has featured in orchestras for centuries.

The horn's sound is easily recognizable thanks to the prominent role it's played in some of the most epic classical songs and movie themes. But it's still an uncommon instrument, and not the easiest one to build community around. To that end, dozens of horn players head into the woods in the White Mountains every summer to celebrate and learn more about their instrument.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Since 1847, the Exeter Brass Band has been filling the air with horns and cymbal crashes.

The New Hampshire ensemble is one of the oldest continuously performing bands in the country. This summer, they’re back at it, doing the usual Monday night run of free concerts from the Exeter bandstand, also known as the Swasey Pavilion.

July 8 – 9, 2017

>>>The New Bedford Folk Festival

New Bedford, Massachusetts   ~   newbedfordfolkfestival.org

Performers include: Aoife O’Donovan, Patty Larkin, Susan Werner, Catie Curtis and a 2015 finalist on NBC-TVs the Voice, Joshua Davis, Lucy Wainwright Roche, Ellis Paul, Bill Harley, Jim Kweskin, Vance Gilbert, The Nields and many more.

July 9-15, 2017

>>>Festival on the Green

Michael Brindley / New Hampshire Public Radio

One of New Hampshire’s most eclectic music and art festivals turns 10 this year.

The Thing in the Spring kicks off Wednesday in Peterborough, and continues to grow, adding a fifth day this year.

The festival features a wide range of independent musicians. There are art displays, film screenings, and even food trucks.

4.18.17: Vetoes & Kinan Azmeh

Apr 18, 2017
Tim Evanson via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/cVHCid

On today's show:

  • Civics 101: Veto
  • "Crazy Bet" from producer Nate DiMeo and The Memory Palace. Listen again at PRX.org. 
  • Clarinetist and composer Kinan Azmeh was born in Damascus, but now lives in New York, where he wakes up to bad news each day. He’s going to be performing with the Kinan Azmeh CityBand at Phillips Academy Exeter tonight at 7:00pm and at the West Claremont Center for Music and the Arts tomorrow, April 19th at 6:30pm to celebrate the band's 10th season together. This is our previous conversation with Kinan and composer Kareem Roustom, recorded in 2013.
  • "The Gift of Music" from Masumi Hayashi-Smith and the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. Listen again at PRX.org. 

Roger H. Goun via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/bF6sXx

On today's show:

Steven Nichols via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/59y3nV

On today's show: 

MWV Chamber of Commerce via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/DCd9Ju

Yellowstone may be the first national park, but it was New Hampshire's White Mountains that for decades prior captured the imagination of American tourists, scientists, and artists. Today, a portrait of Mount Washington's artistic history.

Plus, from Bob Dylan to Yoko Ono, audiences have long had a fascination with the off-beat or out of tune - so why do we love some bad singers and love to hate others?

Then, America's great repository of world knowledge faces an existential predicament. In a world where information is stored in servers and googled at will, can the Library of Congress really keep up?

Fake Plastic Alice via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5L2wa8

Today, voices of Terezin, the Nazi concentration camp used to divert attention from the final solution. We'll hear about how prisoners held under brutal conditions created art and music amid the horrors of the holocaust

Plus, what happens when a protest movement professing all-or-nothing absolutism splits in two? We'll find out how a splinter group of vegan activists toned down their goals and built a powerful machine for change.

Dave Herholz via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/311W1T

Flagrantly unsubstantiated "facts", misrepresented news, and deliberately false memes whooped up by the partisan fringes have been fast and furious this election... And thanks to Facebook's algorithm, fake news stories continue to trend. Today, if you yell at the Facebook echo chamber to stop, does it only get louder?

Then, in a contentious election season full of bombshells, boasts, and social media driving the outrage, how do newsrooms determine what deserves attention what doesn’t?

BBC Arts, November 6, 2015

Although you would be hard-pressed to find a palm tree or a kalua pig roast in New Hampshire, there are a plethora of ukulele opportunities in the Granite State.  The uke is a four-string member of the lute family, and originated in Hawaii in the 19th century, an adaptation of the Portuguese machete.  According to Hawaiian lore, the name means "the gift that came here”, from the Hawaiian words uku (gift or reward) and lele (to come).

7.21.16: Finding Music After 40 & Sleepover Podcast

Jul 21, 2016
eldeeem via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/gXijFE

A new study has confirmed a sad truth about our listening habits - people stop discovering new music around age 33.  Today on Word of Mouth, a seasoned music editor offers tips on how not to get stuck listening to the songs you loved in high school for the rest of your life.

emerysteele via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/aZVRG2

The ad agency for Royal Caribbean chose a lively, catchy tune for a series of commercials for the cruise line, but it didn’t exactly match the wholesome, fun loving image they were trying to promote. On today’s show we’ll explore how the power of sound can make or break an experience.

Then, we’ll speak with the Israeli musician known as Kutiman, about crafting an album made entirely of unrelated sound samples from YouTube videos.

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