morning edition | New Hampshire Public Radio

morning edition

As we hunker down for the winter weather, we’re frequently too preoccupied with what is in our front yards that we tend not to notice what isn’t there.  And short of finding a postcard in your mailbox from a warm exotic location, signed by your friendly neighborhood phoebe, you probably haven’t thought much about the birds that flitted through your yard just months ago.

Samuel Taylor

By the time the cold weather months hit us,  three of New Hampshire’s eight species of bats have already migrated to warmer places in the South and Mid-Atlantic regions. 

The bat that DO overwinter in New Hampshire have relocated out of their preferred summer roosts in trees (and Dave's chimney), and into winter hibernacula like caves, mine shafts, and abandoned military  bunkers where the microclimate is just right.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

Today’s Ask Civics 101 question: What are concession speeches?

Read on, or listen to this short episode for the answer.

Do you have a question for the team? Click here to submit it.

David Anderson

Standing dead trees (often called snags) are common in our forests, and it’s hard to overstate just how vital a role they play in a healthy ecosystem. These gray ghosts provide food and shelter for a whole heap of forest critters; a total of 43 species of birds and mammals are specially adapted to nesting or denning inside tree cavities.

Dave Anderson

It's late August, and the leaves are already starting to change. And that flush of red you’re seeing likely comes from the red maple, also known as “swamp” or “soft maple”.

It's an adaptable tree renowned for signaling an impending autumn, and has even earned the dubious nickname: “Judas Tree” – for betraying these late summer days.  

This Something Wild segment was produced by the amazing Andrew Parrella.

You may be familiar with hoarders (not the TV show, but same idea).  In nature, a hoarder will hide food in one place.  Everything it gathers will be stored in a single tree or den.  But for some animals one food cache isn't enough.  We call them scatter hoarders.  

For many public radio listeners, Morning Edition is a staple part of their days. As they prepare for the workday, the school day or their daily commute, the long running program may be the first encounter they have each day with the latest news and stories from their communities, across the nation and around the world. For 40 years, the signature musical sound of Morning Edition was an iconic theme first composed by BJ Leiderman and later arranged by musician Jim Pugh.

 

NPR is implementing some changes to its Morning Edition broadcast. Here's a Q&A guide that explains more about the changes and how it may impact what you hear when you tune in weekday mornings to NHPR.   

What’s Happening?

Beginning on Monday, August 13, listeners to NHPR may notice some slight changes to the Morning Edition broadcast.

To better reflect listening habits and changing patterns in news consumption, National Public Radio (NPR) is revising its Morning Edition clock.

News & Brews: Morning Edition Comes to Keene

May 13, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

Join us for the second night of our new event series, News & Brews!

These informal meet-ups give you a behind the scenes look at what's going at NHPR. This time around, Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley and Morning Edition Producer Michael Brindley will talk about what goes into making the local news you hear each morning. After a short talk, they will field your questions and stick around to chat!

When: Friday, May 20, 2016 at 5:30 pm

Where: Fireworks, Main Street, Keene, NH

NHPR Staff

Beginning Monday, November 17, you may notice some changes to your favorite NHPR newsmagazines (particularly Morning Edition) as NPR implements some long-planned changes to its program clock.

The biggest change you’ll hear is more newscasts. Instead of two newscasts at the top and the bottom of each hour ("radio speak" for a minute past and thirty minutes past), you’ll now hear three NPR national newscasts (at :01, :19, and :42 minutes past the hour) and four NHPR local newscasts (at :04, :20, :30, and :43 minutes past the hour).

Division Of The Arts Lands New Director

Jun 16, 2014

New Hampshire will soon have a new director of the Department of Cultural Resources Division of the Arts. Ginnie Lupi comes to the position after serving of the executive director of the ARTS Council of the Southern Finger lakes in Corning, NY. Lupi will take over the position in August. I spoke with Lupi about her appointment as director and her plans for art in the Granite State:

What does the department do and what is your role in the Arts Division?