medicaid work requirement

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

More than $4 million in state and federal money was spent rolling out a Medicaid work requirement in New Hampshire that was later struck down by a federal judge.

The numbers, which come from state estimates provided to the Government Accountability Office, are the first estimate of the total cost of the now defunct program.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office says it will appeal a federal judge's ruling that blocked the implementation of the state’s Medicaid work requirement, making New Hampshire the third Republican-led state to appeal such a ruling.

On Monday, the same U.S. District Court judge that blocked similar work requirements in Arkansas and Kentucky blocked New Hampshire's work requirement. In his ruling the judge even wrote, "we have all seen this movie before."

State officials say they are halting their efforts to educate people about a new Medicaid work requirement, now that a federal judge has blocked its implementation.

The state health department had been going door-to-door in an effort to reach roughly 17,000 New Hampshire residents who did not comply with the requirement in its first month.

On Monday, a federal judge in Washington D.C. said the Trump administration was in error when it allowed New Hampshire to impose the work requirement on certain Medicaid expansion beneficiaries.

iStock

A federal judge has blocked the implementation of New Hampshire's Medicaid work requirement.

The ruling reverses a move by the Trump administration that allowed New Hampshire to impose a 100-hour-a-month work requirement on beneficiaries of expanded Medicaid. 

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Oral arguments are scheduled Tuesday morning in a federal lawsuit challenging New Hampshire's Medicaid work requirement.

The class-action lawsuit charges that the Trump administration exceeded its authority by allowing New Hampshire to implement the work requirement. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 12, 2019

Jul 11, 2019

The Executive Council shoots down the nomination of Attorney General Gordon McDonald to the New Hampshire Supreme Court. Two-thirds of Medicaid recipients in New Hampshire failed to comply with the new work requirement, prompting a delay of the penalties; the Concord School Board examines how it handles allegations of sexual abuse. 

GUESTS:

  • Ethan DeWitt - Concord Monitor statehouse reporter.
  • Sarah Gibson - NHPR Reporter.
  • Jason Moon - NHPR Reporter.
  • James Pindell – Political reporter for The Boston Globe.
  • Dean Spiliotes - Civic scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at SNHU.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Ever since New Hampshire’s Medicaid work requirement was approved by the Trump administration last November, critics have warned it would be plagued by the same problems that beset another Medicaid work requirement in Arkansas.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

During the first month of a new Medicaid work requirement in New Hampshire, nearly 17,000 recipients were out of compliance, prompting Gov. Chris Sununu to announce Monday that the law’s penalties will be delayed through September.

With just days remaining before the first deadline to comply with the state's new Medicaid work requirement, some people say they are having problems submitting their work hours through the state website.

On that website, a drop-down menu lists the categories under which Medicaid beneficiaries can submit their hours. The list includes volunteering, job training, and a half-dozen other activities.

It does not include employment or self-employment. In fact, it appears there is no way for a Medicaid beneficiary to submit their own work hours online.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Lawyers for the state of New Hampshire are insisting that no one will lose coverage under a new Medicaid work requirement unless they choose not to comply with it.

That argument comes in response to a lawsuit that's challenging the work requirement in federal court.

In a legal memo filed on Friday, the state supports their argument by pointing out that three of the four plaintiffs in the class-action lawsuit are either exempt or are already in compliance with the work requirement.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

New Hampshire lawmakers have approved changes to work requirement rules for Medicaid recipients just as the requirements are taking effect.

The rules require most recipients to spend at least 100 hours a month working, going to school or participating in community service.

The House and Senate approved a compromise bill Thursday that would suspend, but not eliminate, coverage for noncompliance.

The state would have until July 2021 to waive the requirements in several scenarios, including if the state is unable to contact all participants to explain the rules.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

As a new work requirement for beneficiaries of New Hampshire’s expanded Medicaid program takes effect this month, some in the healthcare industry say early signs are pointing to a bumpy road ahead.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A bill that seeks to limit the impact of a controversial new Medicaid work requirement is now headed to Governor Chris Sununu’s desk.

The so-called community engagement requirement is set to take effect in June. It will require some low-income people who get their health insurance through the state's expanded Medicaid program to complete 100 hours of work or other qualifying activities each month or risk losing their coverage.

NHPR File Photo

A federal judge has granted the state of New Hampshire's request to intervene in a lawsuit over a new Medicaid work requirement.

Last month, a group of low-income New Hampshire residents sued the Trump administration for granting New Hampshire a waiver that allowed the state to implement the work requirement. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Lawmakers in the New Hampshire House heard testimony Wednesday on a bill that would roll back some elements of a controversial new Medicaid work requirement.

The new work requirement, set to fully kick in this summer, will require some people who get their health insurance through expanded Medicaid to complete 100 hours of qualifying activities each month or risk losing that coverage.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 29, 2019

Mar 28, 2019

The battle to abolish the death penalty advances to the state senate. Governor Sununu sends stronger signal that he may run for the Senate next year, boosted by polls suggesting he may have a chance at defeating Senator Shaheen. And we look how several national issues may affect the state, including a federal court ruling on Medicaid work requirements, and a multi-million dollar settlement against Purdue Pharma, maker of Oxycontin.  Dean Spiliotes is guest host.


Dan Tuohy

The future of New Hampshire's Medicaid work requirement may be in doubt following a federal court decision that struck down similar work requirements in Arkansas and Kentucky.

In a ruling released Wednesday afternoon, a judge in the federal District Court of Washington D.C. called the decision by the Trump administration to allow the work requirements to go forward in those states “arbitrary and capricious.” 

Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers On Top D.H.H.S. Issues

Mar 26, 2019
Dan Tuohy for NHPR

We sit down with Department of Health and Human Services Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers. The Department of Health and Human Services is the largest state agency and accounts for approximately forty percent of the state budget. We discuss the state's ten-year mental health plan, as well as recent challenges to medicaid work requirements.  And we get an update on the state's hub and spoke system for addiction treatment, and concerns about the Division of Children, Youth and Families. 

GUEST:

Jeffrey Meyers - Appointed in 2016, Meyers is Commissioner of the N.H. Department of Health and Human Services. 

NHPR Photo

 

Low-income residents of New Hampshire are suing the federal government over the state's work requirements for those enrolled under Medicaid expansion.

The National Health Law Program, New Hampshire Legal Assistance and the National Center for Law and Economic Justice sued on behalf of a 26-year-old sporting goods store cashier, a 40-year-old who does seasonal work and lives off the land, as well as a couple with three children.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Right now, around 50,000 people in New Hampshire get their health insurance through expanded Medicaid. As a creation of the Affordable Care Act, the program is designed to cover people who make too much money to qualify for traditional Medicaid, but not enough to afford private health insurance.

Beginning later this year, for some of those 50,000 people, there is a new string attached to that health insurance: a requirement they work at least 100 hours each month.

Sara Plourde For NHPR

New Hampshire has joined a handful of states that mandate some Medicaid recipients to engage in certain activities: for example, a job, school, or community services. But recent federal changes tightening certain aspects of the program, as well as proposed legislation, have renewed debate over the Granite State's approach. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

An effort to undo a new work-requirement in the state's Medicaid expansion program went before lawmakers today.

The work requirement was part of a bipartisan compromise that re-authorized expanded Medicaid last session.

Starting next month some Medicaid Expansion recipients will need to complete 100 hours of work or volunteer work each month or risk losing their health coverage.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A new report from the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities argues the rollout of New Hampshire's work requirement for expanded Medicaid beneficiaries is doomed to the same problems that have hampered a similar policy in Arkansas.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

State lawmakers are pushing back against changes made by the Trump administration to a new work requirement in the state’s expanded Medicaid program.

Members of the committee that oversees administrative rules unanimously objected to the changes the Trump administration introduced when it approved the work requirement for Medicaid expansion last month.