Media | New Hampshire Public Radio

Media

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Deccan Herald

We discuss last week's attempted coup at the U.S. Capitol in D.C. while exploring how social media and disinformation campaigns contributed to this moment. We also put the attack in historic context and talk about how news coverage is part of the discussion. 

Air date: Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021. 

Salmon Press Newspapers

Newspapers in New Hampshire are in a strange position with COVID-19: lots of readers, but a steep decline in revenue as businesses close in the pandemic.

Click here to sign up for our newsletter to get the latest updates on coronavirus in New Hampshire delivered to your inbox.  

Right now, in any other year, the Lakes Region would be gearing up for summer – hotels would be selling rooms, restaurants would be preparing to reopen.

You can’t outscroll them.

Political ads are bombarding social media in New Hampshire right now, as presidential candidates try to squeeze in as much digital facetime as they can in the lead up to Tuesday’s primary.

  

Flickr/Bhaskar Dutta

A bill coming before the legislature next year would require news organizations in New Hampshire to update or retract stories on the internet about a criminal proceeding if the defendant is ultimately found not guilty. 

The proposed legislation is sponsored by Rep. Jack Flanagan, a Republican from Brookline, who says two constituents contacted him requesting the measure.

Cori Hirai

As they face one of the largest presidential fields in generations, Democratic primary voters in New Hampshire are looking for ways to keep up with all the platforms and policy proposals. 

But for voters of all stripes, navigating the news is more complicated than ever before. Political attacks on news organizations have undermined faith in the press, and as a result, media organizations are often drawn into the political fight of the day. 

NHPR’s Daniela Allee talked with Democratic voters who are recalibrating the way they consume the news as they prepare for the primary. 

Flickr/Bhaskar Dutta

Seacoast Media Group, which publishes the Portsmouth Herald and Foster’s Daily Democrat newspapers, is laying off an unknown number of staff members, the result of what it’s parent company GateHouse Media calls a “restructuring.”

The layoffs are part of wider cost cutting measures announced this week by GateHouse, which owns local newspapers across the country.

The Role Of Local Journalism In New Hampshire

Apr 26, 2019

Nationally, newspaper readership is way down, but we talk with four New Hampshire publishers about how they're adapting and thriving.  We also examine new research on the impact of when a local paper goes away: with no journalistic oversight, taxes often go up and incumbent politicians face less competition

More than 300 news outlets across the country published editorials today denouncing President Trump's attacks on the media. Several New Hampshire publications participated in the campaign, which was lead by the Boston Globe's Opinion Page Editor. 

Since taking office, the President has called journalists "crooked," the "enemy of the people," and, of course, "fake." 

"What he refers to as fake news isn't fake at all," said Dana Wormold, Editor of the Concord Monitor's opinion page. "It's news reports that he's uncomfortable with for whatever reason." 

David Folkenflik joins us as part of our Justice & Journalism series with UNH Law School. We talk about the vast changes in journalism he's seen in recent years, from the impact of social media, to "fake news," to covering the #MeToo movement, including at NPR. 

Flickr/Bhaskar Dutta

The top editor in the newsroom at the Nashua Telegraph has been fired.

Britta Greene / NHPR

CNN anchor Jake Tapper reflected on his career in journalism in a commencement address to graduates of Dartmouth College Sunday.

Tapper has been in the spotlight recently for his pointed, and at times combative, back-and-forths with members of the Trump administration. But he said his 2012 book detailing a deadly battle in Afghanistan remains his proudest accomplishment.

This story has been updated to make note of the AP's correction to its original story, issued Wednesday.

Last week, the Associated Press — along with other local news outlets — covered Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway’s visit to New Hampshire to speak at party fundraiser.

The New Hampshire Republican Party took issue with the AP’s decision to report from inside the closed-press event, the accuracy of its brief story and the integrity of the reporter who filed it — and responded with a firestorm of criticism, on social media and elsewhere. 

NH1

WBIN-TV announced Friday it will cease operations in the coming months after selling its broadcasting rights to the FCC. The network, which was purchased five years ago by former U.S. Senate candidate and New Hampshire businessman Bill Binnie, says proceeds from the sale approach $100 million.

“I am incredibly proud of the people in our television, radio and digital media businesses,” says Binnie in a statement posted to the NH1 website.  

Michal Przedlacki / Flickr/CC

The tragic killing of Charlie Sennott's colleague, New Hampshire native James Foley, was the first exposure for most Americans to ISIS, and a turning point for news organizations who send journalists to the front lines.  We speak with Sennott about his latest initiative to train a new generation of international correspondents in the digital age.

This program was originally broadcast on 4/27/16.

James Vaughan via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/c83XTb

What do McDonalds hamburgers and NPR underwriting have in common? Ray and Joan Kroc.  One, a business tycoon responsible for building a world-wide brand and the other a strong woman with a passion for progressive causes. Today we’re learning about the odd couple pairing of a billionaire-entrepreneur and peace-loving philanthropist.

Plus, a collection of stories follows characters down the slippery slope of technological dependency -  and how to slow it down.

Cliff via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/6buvmh

Among the complaints about the presidential campaign on social media or talking with friends: how come the mainstream media never covers this candidate, those facts, that scandal. Today, is the media really dropping the ball?

Then, last fall, the aids health foundation launched a billboard campaign in Los Angeles linking mobile dating apps like Tinder and Grindr to the spread of STDs. The foundation charged that these apps are making casual sex as easily available as ordering a pizza. Now a start-up called Mately is banking that online daters will pay a premium to know the sexual history of their potential hook-ups

Stephen Little via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/dThgwp

This weekend Batman and Superman will face off in multiplexes across America. It will be, as the trailer promises, a classic set-up.

Thomas Hawk via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5VMVjQ

In 2013, journalist Adrienne LaFrance scanned her own reporting and found that only 25% of people mentioned in her reporting were women. Two years later she did the same thing. The result was…disappointing. Today, a reporter owns up to perpetuating gender bias.

Then, from TV's campy crusader to the Dark Knight, Batman has been reflected American anxieties and social norms for almost 80 years. We'll explore his appeal as a mere mortal among superhumans, making him a magnet for our heroic dreams. 

Logan Shannon

We spoke to YouTube superstar and writer of books Grace Helbig after the publication of her second tongue-in-cheek guide, Grace & Style: The Art of Pretending You Have It. She gave us a glimpse at her writing process backstage at The Music Hall in Portsmouth, NH before a Writers on a New England Stage event.

News Media and the 2016 Election Cycle

Feb 9, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

The news media is often seen as a troubled industry, with newspaper circulation and local reporting on the decline, and a continued rocky transition to a digital and mobile world.  We'll re-examine how this trend is playing out nationally and in New Hampshire, especially in the midst of a tumultuous primary election.

Karla via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/gr3Bno

After a group of anti-government activists took over an Oregon wildlife refuge last weekend, news outlets are struggling with how to identify them and their goals. On today’s show, a media reporter says in today's partisan, all-in media landscape, news reporters have an obligation to choose words carefully.

Then, 2015 was a banner year for science, from Pluto’s photo shoot, to the Ebola vaccine. So what's next? We'll hear about some of the big ideas in store for 2016, including the future of the gene editing tool: CRISPR.

WMUR's news team will have no role in next week's Democratic debate.

Pool Photo/Geoff Forester, Concord Monitor

The trial of Owen Labrie, a former student at St.Paul’s School charged with raping a 15-year old school mate in 2014, ended last week with his acquittal on the most serious felony rape charges and convictions on several lesser charges.

This case has drawn national media coverage and raised questions about how such cases get reported in an age of instant electronic communication, live-tweeting, and streaming video. 

Two northern New England news organizations have received a national Edward R. Murrow Award for overall excellence from an organization representing local and network journalists in broadcasting, cable and digital media in more than 30 countries.

The awards for New Hampshire Public Radio in Concord and Free Press Media in Burlington, Vermont, were announced Wednesday by the Radio Television Digital News Association.

Reporter Dan Balz and columnist E.J. Dionne are in the state for an award ceremony at UNH Law.  We’ll get their thoughts on how political coverage has changed, especially of events such as the New Hampshire primary, but also what they hope won’t change in terms of ethics and standards.

GUEST:

Introducing: NPR CEO Jarl Mohn

Nov 18, 2014
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Mohn took the reins just a few months ago, after several years of leadership changes at the public radio network.  We’ll find out what his goals are for NPR in this era of information abundance and new challenges for traditional media.

GUESTS:

  • Jarl Mohn  - president and CEO of National Public Radio since July, 2014. Previously, he was a radio disc jockey, a media executive, and board member of Southern California Public Radio.

David Waltz

With an ever-changing media landscape, it can be increasingly difficult to parse out from the news who’s right, who’s wrong, and why it matters. We’ll get Gladstone’s perspective, from the role of social media in news consumption, to the blurred lines between reporting and advertising.

GUESTS:

Giving Matters: Making Kids Savvy Media Consumers

Sep 5, 2014

Mary Jill LaRocca is an elementary school health teacher in Manchester. She helps students navigate the barrage of unhealthy messages that kids are exposed to. She turns to Media Power Youth’s Media Literacy for Safe and Healthy Choices curriculum to help her students think critically about messages that promote violence, alcohol use, junk food and more, so they can be wise media consumers. 

West McGowan via flickr Creative Commons

The preseason has already started, and football fans across the country are gearing up for another action-packed season of hard losses, big wins, and epic hits.

On today’s show, a provocative new book makes a case for why not to watch football. Plus, Iraqi cities under siege, Ebola cases climbing, unrest in Ferguson; despite the tough news, your Facebook news feed may look remarkably chipper, we’ll look into Facebook’s carefully orchestrated positive feedback loop.    

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


cogdogblog via Flickr CC

  Last week, the Federal Reserve released a startling statistic: one in five people nearing retirement age have no money saved for it. On today’s show we pose the question: have we reached the end of retirement? Plus, forget the fashion of New York City, London’s music scene, and the bright lights of Tokyo. Why South Korea may become the coolest place on the planet. 

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


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