Mark Sanford

House.gov

Mark Sanford dropped his challenge to President Donald Trump for the Republican presidential nomination on Tuesday, saying the focus on impeachment has made it impossible for his campaign to gain traction.

"You've got to be a realist," Sanford said outside the New Hampshire statehouse. "What I did not anticipate is an impeachment."

Congressional office

Mark Sanford, the most prominent primary challenger to President Donald Trump, has said he won't solicit contributions from his longtime donor base until he's "proven a measure of electoral success."

Bill Kristol has yet to fully activate a super PAC aimed at hurting Trump's reelection chances.

And Stuart Stevens, the top strategist for Sen. Mitt Romney's 2012 presidential campaign, until he was prompted, could not recall the name of the super PAC he is advising that supports another Trump challenger, Bill Weld.

Congress

Mark Sanford's first presidential campaign stop in New Hampshire began with an interruption in the hopes of being heard.

Sanford, the former South Carolina governor and congressman, entered a Manchester diner and found his way to an AARP meeting in the back. "Can I be rude?" he asked them, trying to introduce himself amid the din of the breakfast diner. He later bounced from booth to booth to chat with other patrons at the restaurant.

House.gov

 

Mark Sanford, the former South Carolina governor and congressman, is heading to another early voting state as he considers mounting an uphill challenge to President Donald Trump for the Republican presidential nomination.