Mark Huddleston

Mike Ross / UNH Photographic Services

Former UNH President Mark Huddleston’s employment agreement is getting some big changes. He’ll be returning to UNH this year, making a $20,000 salary as an adjunct instructor in the UNH Professional Development and Training department.

According to the agreement, Huddleston will present at various leadership conferences and institutes, and provide “consulting services” for future curriculum in that department this year. He will also be working with state public officials through UNH Extension.

CREDIT MIKE ROSS, UNH

The University of New Hampshire updated former president Mark Huddleston’s contract to include the promise of a year of full salary after retirement in order to help the school weather a financial crisis, according to a top official with the state university system.

University of New Hampshire

Former University of New Hampshire president Mark Huddleston continued to collect a $425,000 salary in the year after he retired from his position in June 2018. That put Huddleston slightly behind UNH’s current president, Jim Dean, who earns $455,000 a year since taking over for Huddleston last summer. 

University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire President Mark Huddleston announced Wednesday that he will be retiring next year. 

When he leaves the University in 2018, Mark Huddleston will have been the longest-serving President in the school’s history. Tim Riley, the chair of the University System’s Board of Trustees, says Huddleston will leave big shoes to fill.

How does University of New Hampshire President Mark Huddleston explain the size of the school's top salaries, including his own, to students and families struggling to pay tuition?

The leader of New Hampshire’s flagship university, speaking on NHPR's The Exchange Monday, said the school needs to offer competitive rates to attract the best talent — but Huddleston maintained that the school isn’t “overpaying” in the process.

NHPR

In his annual address, Huddleston celebrated UNH's one hundred and fiftieth birthday this year, and declared that the state's flagship institution is thriving, with a growing student body, new degree programs, and robust private donations.  Still, challenges remain, including uncertain state funding and staggering student debt.