Live Free Or Die

Justine Paradis

Three years ago, Samuel and Rachel purchased a wooden crate manufactured by inmates at the New Hampshire State Prison, but they wondered: was it ethically made? 

This is the third episode in our four-part series on mass incarceration in New Hampshire. Explore the full series here. 

Ali Oshinskie/NHPR

 

 

Valentine’s Day is Thursday. But for the Hallmark-holiday naysayers, fear not! You'll always have New Hampshire.

Granite Staters are devoted to New Hampshire. Let’s hear from you: Why do you love New Hampshire? Where did your love of the Granite State begin?

NHPR File Photo

 

Long live "Live Free or Die."

Written by Revolutionary War Gen. John Stark in 1809 and adopted as the state motto in 1945, the phrase won praise from then-candidate Donald Trump just before the 2016 presidential primary.

"What a great slogan," Trump said in a Facebook video. "Congratulations, New Hampshire. Wonderful job."

To Trump, the motto stood for everything from free enterprise and border security to "taking care of our vets."

Lauren Chooljian / NHPR

 

George and Maxine Maynard have what you might call a complicated relationship with New Hampshire's state motto.

And when the U.S. Supreme Court takes up a controversial free speech case next month, the Maynards' decades-old legal battle over the state’s ubiquitous “Live Free or Die” will be back in the spotlight.