law enforcement | New Hampshire Public Radio

law enforcement

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu says he’s backing a wide ranging list of nearly 50 policy recommendations put forward to reform policing in the state.

The recommended reforms come from a commission created in the wake of the killing of George Floyd by Minneopolis police officers. 

Manchester PD

Exactly a year ago today, someone fired six bullets into a tidy yellow house with dark shutters in Manchester. Two more shots struck a car parked outside the house.

Appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire’s highest court will hear oral arguments Wednesday on whether a secret list of police officers with credibility issues should be released to the public.

A group of media companies led by the N.H. Center for Public Interest Journalism, as well as the ACLU of New Hampshire, sued in 2018 for the release of the Exculpatory Evidence Schedule, better known as the "Laurie List." 

The Commission on Law Enforcement Accountability and Transparency has spent the last few months discussing current law enforcement practices in N.H. Now, they've released recommendations for police training, misconduct, and community engagement. We talk with four members of the commission about their biggest takeaways, and what's next. 

Air date: Tuesday, September 8, 2020. 

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del viernes 21 de agosto. 

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Hay 225 casos activos de  COVID-19 en New Hampshire

Los funcionarios de salud reportaron el jueves que otra persona en New Hampshire ha fallecido por COVID-19 y que hay 14 [catorce] nuevos casos positivos del virus, pero, no se reportaron nuevas hospitalizaciones. 

Sean Hurley

Estas son las noticias del martes 11 de agosto.

 

Se pueden escuchar haciendo click en el audio o se las puede leer a continuación.

Una nota: lo siguiente es el guion que utilizamos para las grabaciones, por lo que tiene anotaciones diferentes.

Cifras actualizadas del COVID-19 en New Hampshire: 13 nuevos casos.

Los funcionarios de salud del estado reportaron 13 [trece] nuevos casos de COVID-19 y tres hospitalizaciones. Además, no hubo ningún fallecimiento vinculado al virus ayer. 

Scroll down in this story to watch the video

Around midnight on a Saturday, Thomas Hurd fell asleep at the bar of a Chinese restaurant in Farmington, New Hampshire. 

The bartender, suspecting Hurd was drunk when he got there, asked him to leave. According to police reports, Hurd instead began smashing plates and flipping tables. 

NHPR Photo

A group of lawmakers want to create a uniform statewide policy for how local law enforcement officers respond to misconduct within the force, including mandating public disclosure of any allegations. 

Under a bill coming up for debate next session, police officers in New Hampshire would be required to notify their chief when they see a fellow officer violate policy, from tampering with evidence to assaulting a suspect.

A list containing the names of approximately 250 New Hampshire law enforcement officers who may have credibility issues must be made public, according to an order issued by a Superior Court judge.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Robert Frese’s police file is as thick as the Bible, but it contains a very different collection of stories.

Take the time he hit a traffic flagger and drove off.

It was August 2017, and Frese, unhappy with a road closure in Portsmouth, bumped his car into Fred Chase before fleeing the scene.

Marlborough Police Department

When cops go online, sometimes they make jokes. 

NHPR File Photo

The ACLU of New Hampshire, along with a group of news organizations, is suing the N.H. Attorney General over the release of an internal list of police officers with credibility issues.

N.H. State Police

Federal prosecutors have settled a case with a Maine man who says $46,000 seized during a traffic stop was lawfully his.

In October of 2016, New Hampshire State Police found the money in the trunk of a vehicle during a routine traffic stop on Interstate 95 in Greenland.

The driver was released without any charges, but law enforcement, using a legal maneuver called civil asset forfeiture, seized the cash under suspicion it was connected to illegal activity.

A Sullivan County judge has set a December trial date for former Claremont police officer Ian Kibbe.

Kibbe is facing several charges relating to allegedly faking documents while serving on the Claremont police force.

He appeared briefly in court in Newport Tuesday. His attorney declined a plea deal offered by the state.

As he awaits trial, both the Claremont Police Department and the Sullivan County Attorney's office have been combing through his arrest reports. They're throwing out cases that are now in question in light of the charges against him.

Courtesy NH State Police

On October 3rd, 2016, around 7:45 at night, a New Hampshire State Trooper pulled over a red Hyundai with Massachusetts plates heading northbound on I-95.

According to the police report, the car was going 66-mph in a 65-mph zone, and was tailgating behind a pickup truck. The driver of the car, a man named Alexander Temple, appeared nervous. The trooper noticed his hands were shaking.

Courtesy NH State Police

Law enforcement officials say a massive drug sweep on Thursday resulted in 151 arrests and the seizure of more than 550 grams of heroin and fentanyl.

The Granite Shield operation involved dozens of partner agencies who fanned out across the state, targeting opioid and other drug dealers.

NHPR Photo

 

New Hampshire’s "drug czar" says the recent collapse of Manchester’s Safe Station treatment provider has revealed gaps in the state's care.

policearchives.org

Small towns in New Hampshire are struggling to find and keep quality police chiefs. This fall, the town of Newbury let it's police chief go. Bristol's police chief resigned, citing personnel issues. And the town of Webster had disagreements with its police chief, a dispute which ended up in court.

Andrew Shagoury is the police chief for the town of Tuftonboro, and the president of the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Shagoury about the difficulties with hiring police chiefs in smaller towns.

Jarek Tuszyński/Wikimedia

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday in a case concerning law enforcement's access to cell phone tracking data, and what constitutes a reasonable search under the Constitution’s Fourth Amendment.

New Hampshire’s Attorney General Gordon MacDonald joined 18 other state Attorneys General in support of the government’s position that law enforcement doesn’t need a search warrant to obtain cell phone tracking data kept by wireless providers.  

Courtesy of Keene State College

New Hampshire police chiefs overwhelmingly cite drug abuse as the most serious problem facing their communities, according to a new survey from Keene State College.

“Police chiefs are confronting these problems every day,” said Keene State Professor Angela Barlow, who directed the survey. “And they’re having very little success at reducing the opioid crisis and addiction issues within their communities.”

The survey went out to all full-time police chiefs in New Hampshire last year. About half, including those from the largest cities, responded, Barlow said.

Appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

Three months ago, the Legislature signed off on a bill to expand an anti-drug law enforcement program known as Granite Hammer.

On Wednesday, state officials announced plans to distribute more than a million dollars in grant money to municipalities across New Hampshire. 

Matt Kieffer via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/ywYaFj

Some 2000 years ago, Roman philosopher and acclaimed public speaker Cicero outlined the ideal orator: a gentle speaker who uses logic, character, and emotion to persuade an audience.  So what would Cicero think of tonight's debaters: Clinton and Trump? Today, 2016 rhetoric through the eyes of an ancient.

Plus, some police departments respond to charges of racially motivated killings by recruiting more minority officers...except for one demographic that could make a measurable difference: women.

Trigger Warnings, Born In Between, & Miranda July

Sep 9, 2016
Thomas Hawk via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/dSuxV1

Demanding trigger warnings? Canceling speakers? Shutting down comedians? College students today make the political correctness of the past seem tame. Today, is oversensitivity ruining education? We’ll also look at the roots of extreme protectiveness in a nation where police officers are stationed at more and more high schools…a story about what happens when school discipline meets law enforcement. And while the trans-gender movement gains ground, we’ll explore the shockingly common occurrence of doctors assigning gender to intersex babies. 

NHPR File Photo

The southeast New Hampshire town of Barrington has hired its first female officer since the police department was founded in the 1950s. 

security newspaper / Flickr/CC

Following the San Bernadino shooting, the FBI has scrambled to learn as much about the crime as possible. But Apple's refusal to help the bureau unlock one of the shooter's iPhones has stoked the national conversation about the role that tech companies play in national security, and the boundaries of how far law enforcement can probe.

Fines & Incarceration in N.H.

Sep 28, 2015
Peter Stinson / Flickr/CC

A new New Hampshire ACLU report says that too many Granite Staters go to jail because they can't afford to pay court fines. We're looking at how this system works and whether it needs to change.

GUESTS:

Nathan Rupert via flickr CC / flic.kr/p/aEtJLV

As schools across the country struggle to meet the new national common core standards, one controversial aspect of education is not part of the curriculum: sex education. On today’s show: the evolving debate around sex ed, and why it’s not strictly an American phenomenon. Plus, from false confessions to inadequate defenses, wrongful convictions can happen for many reasons. We’ll look at faulty eyewitness testimonies, the number one contributing cause of wrongful convictions.

Reconsidering N.H. Sentencing Laws

Apr 15, 2015
Thomas Hawk / Flickr/cc

Decades of a tough-on-crime approach brought mandatory minimum sentences that many now say are too costly – both in social terms and dollars, as prison populations have soared. State lawmakers recently considered removing these for certain nonviolent offenders. But some are urging caution on behalf of public safety.

fredhosley / Flickr Creative Commons

“Officer-involved shootings”: that’s when police fire their guns during confrontations with suspects.  After two such shootings recently killed two people, questions have been raised about police use of deadly force.  But many in law enforcement say it’s become a more dangerous job, and that they go to great lengths to avoid harm.  We’ll look at police training and protocols. 

GUESTS:

Police Scanner Transparency

Apr 29, 2013
Whiskeygonebad via flickr Creative Commons

When shots were fired before midnight on April 18th, curious, concerned people tracked the dramatic killing of one Boston marathon bombing suspect, and the tense manhunt for his younger brother throughout the night. Many watched and listened through online streaming and social media, others followed the intense action on Boston police scanners; some 180,000 people were tuned in to the scanner feeds during peak traffic. And then, it stopped…

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