income tax | New Hampshire Public Radio

income tax

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The state of New Hampshire announced Friday it will file a federal lawsuit against Massachusetts over its cross-border income tax collection policies during the pandemic.

The lawsuit centers on a Massachusetts emergency provision that caps how much income out-of-state residents who work for Massachusetts-based companies can deduct on their income taxes while working remotely. 

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A New Hampshire man will face more time in prison stemming from a monthslong armed standoff with U.S. marshals in 2007 over a tax evasion conviction that led to the discovery of explosives and booby traps on his property.

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Mark LaVoie lives in Newton, N.H., in an old farmhouse that he’s slowly restoring. Pre-pandemic, he commuted into Boston three or four days a week for a job at a public relations firm.

He was diligent about keeping track of the days he worked from home because Massachusetts allows commuters like him to deduct those days from their income tax obligations.

Or, at least it used to. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Congressman Chris Pappas is co-sponsoring legislation to prevent states, including Massachusetts, from collecting income tax on non-residents who are working at home due to the pandemic.

The proposed bill takes aim at an emergency order issued by Massachusetts in March that allows the state to continue to collect an income tax on non-resident workers employed by Massachusetts-based entities, even if those workers are no longer commuting into the state due to the coronavirus pandemic.

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The New Hampshire Attorney General is reviewing whether the Massachusetts Department of Revenue is violating either state or federal law as it seeks to collect income taxes from residents of other states during the pandemic.

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A lawyer for a woman awaiting re-sentencing with her husband for holding U.S. marshals at bay from their fortress-like home in 2007 says she is ashamed of her actions and is seeking a divorce.

Elaine Brown, now 78, was sentenced to 35 years in prison after the standoff at the couple's 100-acre property in Plainfield, New Hampshire.

Her husband, Edward Brown, received a 37-year sentence.

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Edward and Elaine Brown, the Plainfield couple who led a months-long armed stand-off with U.S. marshals over their refusal to pay federal income taxes, could be re-sentenced following a separate U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Since the 1970s, every candidate running for governor—or any other major office in New Hampshire—has faced the question: will they pledge to oppose a broad-based sales or income tax?

This year, some prominent Democrats say it is long past time to stop taking what is known as The Pledge. But its political pull remains strong.

To understand how the pledge continues to shape—and some might say warp—politics within the New Hampshire Democratic Party, consider this recent exchange between the party’s two gubernatorial candidates at Dartmouth College.

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Among the slate of economic measures state lawmakers will consider next session is a bill to impose an income tax. The sponsor is well aware of what he’s up against.

Primary 2016: Tax Policy on the Campaign Trail

Feb 1, 2016
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The Presidential candidates have proposed major changes -- from replacing the income tax with a national sales tax, to raising taxes to fund universal health care. We’ll dive into the differences and discuss what new tax policies could mean for you.

We look at a new study that suggests that those factors that have made New Hampshire the economic envy of the region, like its low tax burden, higher income levels and steady influx of well educated people may be waning.  And the one time New Hampshire advantage may be a thing of the past. We'll look at the study and see how bad it may be.

Guests

This fall, Granite Staters will vote on a constitutional amendment that would forever forbid the adoption of broad-based income taxes.  Supporters say enshrining this principle will protect what they’ve long called “The New Hampshire Advantage”,while opponents predict it’ll tie the hands of future leaders to address state priorities.   We'll look at both sides of this debate.

Guests

Amendment To Ban Income Tax Goes To Voters

Jun 6, 2012

New Hampshire voters will decide in November whether or not to add a ban on personal income taxes to the state’s constitution.

In 2012, the federal tax return deadline is Tuesday, April 17 — so if you haven't already filed your income tax return, you have about one week left to shop around for different options to finish your taxes, or request an extension.

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The senate is considering a proposed constitutional amendment that would bar a personal income tax.

The amendment passed the house but is facing head-winds in the Senate.

Top Senate Republicans seemed skeptical during a hearing on the income tax ban.

They say they’re focused on putting an education funding constitutional amendment before the voters next fall.

Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley put House Majority Leader DJ Bettencourt on the defensive, asking if he thought the House is overwhelming the public with amendments.

The story of how the U.S. wound up with the income tax is the story of two wars, a Supreme Court justice on his death bed, and Donald Duck.

It's also the story of how the government overcame three obstacles.

Obstacle No. 1: Logistics

How do you make sure people pay?

In six years a North Country group has helped low and moderate income families get more than two million dollars in tax refunds. Now the free service is underway again. NHPR’s Chris Jensen reports.

Once again the Family Resource Center of Gorham is offering free tax preparation for families and individuals earning no more than $58,000.

Last year a record 422 returns were prepared by trained volunteers.

That gave some for North Country residents a fiscal boost.