Impeachment Inquiry

Congress begins public hearings as part of the impeachment process of President Trump, following a whistleblower complaint into use of presidential authority to pressure the Ukranian government to  investigate Trump's Democratic opponents. What can past presidential impeachment inquiries tell us about the process, and what should we expect going forward? 

Don't miss Civics 101's "Extra Credit" on presidential impeachments, and listen to their episode on impeachment.  Read on for highlights from this conversation. 

Original air date: Wednesday, November 13, 2019. 

Updated at 5:21 p.m. ET

A State Department staffer overheard President Trump asking a top diplomat about "investigations" he wanted Ukraine to pursue that he believed might help him in the 2020 election, another senior diplomat told Congress.

That staffer is expected to tell his story directly to House investigators at a closed-door deposition on Friday.

The new subplot about the overheard phone conversation was one of a small number of new details to emerge from Democrats' first open hearing in their impeachment inquiry into Trump on Wednesday.

The U.S. House of Representatives is holding open hearings in its impeachment inquiry into President Trump on Wednesday and Friday. William B. Taylor, acting U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine, and George P. Kent, senior State Department official in charge of Ukraine policy, are testifying Wednesday.

Updated on Nov. 13 at 8:49 a.m. ET

Public impeachment hearings begin Wednesday, and the first round of witnesses includes three career public servants who have testified behind closed doors that President Trump did link military aid and a White House meeting for Ukraine with a promise to investigate one of the president's domestic political opponents.

Editor's note: This is a developing story and will update with more details of the testimony.

Updated 6 p.m. ET

House.gov

New Hampshire's two members of the U.S. House, Rep. Annie Kuster and Rep. Chris Pappas, voted with nearly all House Democrats to authorize impeachment hearings against President Trump.

The vote for the public hearings, which every Republican opposed, marks the first time the full House voted on the impeachment inquiry.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives voted Thursday 232-196 to pass a resolution formalizing its impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Just two Democrats voted no — Reps. Collin Peterson of Minnesota and Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey.

Amid the debate, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called it a "sad day."

House.gov

The U.S. House of Representatives is voting to formalize its ongoing impeachment inquiry. The resolution before House members on Thursday outlines the next steps in their investigation.

Watch the debate and vote on the House floor live.  It is tentatively scheduled to convene after 9 a.m.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Two very different groups took to the State House on Wednesday. The first called for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, while the second was decked out in ‘Make America Great Again’ T-shirts. 

Neither side, however, appeared to be drawing many people to their cause. 

Updated at 4:29 p.m. ET

Republican members of Congress disrupted the closed-door proceedings of the House impeachment inquiry, preventing a Pentagon official from giving her testimony.

Arguing that the inquiry's interviews should not be held behind closed doors, GOP lawmakers entered the secure area in the Capitol Wednesday where witnesses are typically questioned.

Author and political scientist Allison Stanger, who wrote Whistleblowers: Honesty In America from Washington to Trump, discusses how federal employees who blew the whistle shaped some of our biggest political reckonings, and how the role of the whistleblower has evolved within politics, the media, and national security.

Original air date: October 16, 2019. 

Updated at 10:01 a.m. ET

Senior U.S. diplomats debated the propriety of a White House strategy aimed at pressuring Ukraine for political investigations in exchange for assistance and engagement with President Trump, new documents show.

The Democratic chairmen of three House committees investigating President Trump released dozens of text messages late Thursday from top State Department officials handling European and Ukrainian affairs.

Updated at 6:21 p.m. ET

President Trump now says China should investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter.

Trump brought up China, just days before restarting trade talks with Beijing, while answering questions about his call with his Ukrainian counterpart and what specifically he hoped Ukraine would do about the Biden family.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu says that while he continues to oppose the impeachment of President Donald Trump, he does believe the whistleblower who filed a complaint concerning the president’s alleged pressuring of the leader of Ukraine should be “protected.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Members of New Hampshire’s Democratic congressional delegation welcomed plans to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump this week.

"The American public should be concerned taht we need to take steps to protect national security and our democracy," U.S. Rep. Chris Pappas, D-NH, said. "And it's really important that we ensure that no one is above the law, including the President of the United States."

Updated at 1:42 p.m. ET

A whistleblower filed a complaint on Aug. 12 about President Trump's conversation with a foreign leader, ultimately setting off a formal impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives.

White House

The House Intelligence Committee on Sept. 26 released the declassified whistleblower complaint lodged against President Trump based on his call to the Ukrainian president and his administration's involvement.

Read the complaint:

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

As Congressional Democrats launch an impeachment inquiry into President Trump, many presidential candidates are voicing their support. But impeachment, so far, is getting mixed reactions from Democratic voters in New Hampshire.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A day after the House Speaker announced an impeachment inquiry, President Donald Trump is scheduled to hold a news conference at the United Nations in New York. Speaker Nancy Pelosi said of the inquiry, prompted after Trump's request of a favor from the Ukrainian president to investigate Joe Biden, "No one is above the law."

The president is expected to begin his remarks at 4 p.m. Watch a livestream embed below:

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

President Trump told Ukraine's president that "a lot of people want to find out" about the activities of former Vice President Joe Biden's family in Ukraine and asked its leader to be in touch with lawyer Rudy Giuliani and Attorney General Bill Barr.

That's according to a briefing for correspondents about the contents of the July 25 phone call, on Wednesday at the Justice Department.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has announced the House is moving forward with an official impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump.

Pelosi made the announcement Tuesday from the speaker's office at the Capitol saying "no one is above the law."

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is speaking to reporters after meeting with the House Democratic caucus. There are growing calls for an impeachment inquiry following reports that President Trump pressed Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden.