Impeachment

As the impeachment trial of President Trump moves into the questioning phase, we look back at the arguments presented before the Senate by the House Managers and Trump's defense team, and what to watch in the next phase of the trial. 

Don't miss Civics 101's "Extra Credit" on presidential impeachments, and listen to their episode on impeachment

Original air date: Wednesday, January 28th, 2020.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

People in New Hampshire and hundreds of communities around the country held rallies Tuesday night in support of the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

The House of Representatives is expected to approve articles of impeachment Wednesday. The Senate would then act as jurors for a trial.

Mike Mackey from Newfields stood in the snow in Portsmouth’s Market Square with a sign that read “Save Our Democracy.” He said he hopes members of Congress will successfully impeach and remove the president.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Last week the House Judiciary Committee voted along party lines to approve two articles of impeachment against President Trump: one for abuse of power, the other for obstruction of Congress.

New Hampshire Congressman Chris Pappas, a Democrat representing the 1st Congressional District, announced Sunday that he will vote for both articles of impeachment. 

Speaking on NHPR's The Exchange earlier today, Pappas said he takes his oath of office seriously, and wanted to take plenty of time to get acclimated with the details of this case before making his decision. 

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

WBUR has released a poll showing South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg leading the pack in the New Hampshire primary race.

The poll also looked at how New Hampshire primary voters, both Democrat and Republican, feel about topics like immigration and impeachment.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

For people who pay close attention to politics, this is an unusually busy moment. Two weeks of impeachment hearings in Washington, combined with the crowded field of presidential candidates in the first-in-the-nation primary, is leaving some overwhelmed -- or just plain tuckered out -- in New Hampshire right now. 

Alex McOwen/NHPR

As the impeachment hearings into President Donald Trump's actions with Ukraine unfolded this week, some teachers turned the moment into a civics lesson. Some had students watch the proceedings in class and invited discussion.  But how do teachers navigate a conversation like that?  And what do they hope students took from it?

NHPR All Things Considered host Peter Biello spoke with Dave Alcox, a social studies teacher at Milford High School, and three of his students, Jack Hansen, Jordan King and Kat Raiano, to see how they've talked about impeachment in their classroom. 

All week, we've heard public testimony from US diplomats and government staff about allegations that President Trump was using military aid to Ukraine to leverage an investigation into his political opponents. We want to hear your thoughts - what stood out to you, and what are your questions?

Original air date: Friday, November 22, 2019

New Hampshire Public Radio will be carrying special coverage this week of the public impeachment hearings from Capitol Hill and related programming from NPR. NHPR will carry the hearings in their entirety, available on-air and streaming through nhpr.org.

For all things related to the impeachment proceedings, visit nhpr.org/impeachment for stories and interviews from both NHPR and NPR.