Ice Fishing | New Hampshire Public Radio

Ice Fishing

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A continuación, lee las noticias del 1 de febrero. 

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Casos de COVID-19 y hospitalizaciones disminuyen en New Hampshire, número promedio de fallecimientos se mantiene estable 

WeirsCam / winnipesaukee.com

State officials say ice fishermen should use caution this weekend, with frozen conditions still touch-and-go on New Hampshire’s lakes and ponds despite bitter cold in the forecast.

Courtesy of N.H. Fish and Game

Thomas Knight pulled up from the depths a lunker for the ages on Tuesday.

The Meredith resident caught a 37.65-pound lake trout in Big Diamond Pond in West Stewartstown. The fish, believed by fish biologists to be around 60 years old, broke the state record of 28 pounds, a mark that has stood since 1958.

“It was 15 minutes of chaos and fury,” Knight explained to NHPR when reached by phone. “What a fisherman wants.”

Craig Taylor via Flickr cc

 

It's getting near that time to remove all bobhouses from New Hampshire lakes and ponds.

State law says they must be removed from the ice no later than the end of the day on April 1.

Owners are asked to use precautions, including monitoring ice thickness, to ensure safety when removing them.

Lt. Heidi Murphy of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department says the law is designed to ensure that bobhouses and their contents do not fall through the ice and become a hazard to boaters, or get left behind on shore.

A. Schafermeyer via NHFG

New Hampshire residents can fish for free without a license Saturday.

The state Fish & Game Department holds these free fishing days every year, in summer and winter.

Inland fisheries program supervisor Scott Decker says the experience at this time of year is a little different.

“You’re actually able to walk on the water,” he says.

CREDIT DARYL CARLSON/KAMARAIMAGE.COM

Spring is a time of transition in New Hampshire -- from ice fishing, to open water fishing. That's why the Department of Fish & Game wants residents to remove their bob houses from lakes and ponds by Saturday.

State law lets bob houses stay standing until April 1st. But Fish & Game administrative lieutenant Heidi Murphy says she hopes most have been hauled off the remaining ice by now.

Andy Schafermeyer / N.H. Fish and Game

Residents can fish without a license for one day only Saturday as part of a twice-yearly state program.

The Fish and Game Department holds another free fishing day the first Saturday in June, but this is only the second time they've done one in the winter.

Inland fisheries chief Jason Smith says recent weather might make open water levels too high to fish in some places – which means this year is all about ice fishing.

Daryl Carlson/KamaraImage.com

 

The Great Meredith Rotary Fishing Derby has been postponed due to the climbing temperatures this week.

Derby spokeswoman Donna Ulbricht tells The Laconia Citizen that members of the Meredith Rotary Club and the derby committee voted to postpone the event Friday at an emergency meeting.

The derby will now be held during the last weekend of February with the hope for more cooperative weather. It was originally scheduled for Feb. 21 and Feb. 22.

Craig Taylor via Flickr CC

 

It may still feel cold enough to go ice fishing, but an April 1 deadline is approaching for all bobhouses to be removed from the ice in New Hampshire.

State law requires their removal, to make sure that bobhouses and their contents do not fall through the ice and become a hazard to boaters.

The Fish and Game Department says on Sunday, a man's Jeep fell into soft ice at the end of Meredith Bay on Lake Winnipesaukee as he was trying to remove a bobhouse. The vehicle had to be towed off the lake. There were no reports of injuries.

Daryl Carlson/KamaraImage.com

Every sportsman knows that the best way to catch prey is to use the right bait.

So when the Meredith Rotary Club wanted to raise funds with an ice fishing charity competition years ago, the members chose the best bait they could imagine: money.

“We really believed that was the key to having so much interest in our event,” recalled John Sherman, a current Rotarian who helped start the Great Meredith Rotary Fishing Derby back in 1979. “We offered what was, back then, a lot of prize money.”