Hazardous Waste | New Hampshire Public Radio

Hazardous Waste

NHPR Photo

A metal recycling company in Madbury will have to pay $2.7 million to the state for improper disposal of hazardous waste. It is the largest penalty ever in New Hampshire for hazardous waste violations.

New England Metal Recycling processes used cars, salvaging what’s valuable and then shredding the rest into something known as fluff.

Google Maps

The Environmental Protection Agency is proposing new health restrictions around a Superfund site in the town of Merrimack.

The New Hampshire Plating Company site near the Merrimack River housed an electroplating factory until the 1980s. It left toxic chemicals like lead and arsenic in the soil and groundwater. 

The EPA’s original cleanup plan mostly involved treating contaminated soil and monitoring the groundwater as the chemicals faded away on their own. 

Google Maps / screenshot

The Environmental Protection Agency is out with a plan to clean up a hazardous waste site in downtown Berlin.

The Chlor-Alkali Superfund site sits on the east bank of Androscoggin River, next to the city’s Sawmill Dam.

From the late 1800s until the 1960s, the property housed a factory that supplied paper mills with chemicals, including chloroform, lye and bleach.

Some toxic waste from the factory sits in a capped landfill on the site, where demolition debris from the facility was deposited as recently as 1999, according to the EPA.

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

Most of New Hampshire’s riverside mills and factories have closed. But they’ve left their mark - and in some cases, a lot of toxic waste.

For decades, Nashua has struggled with what to do with waste from the Mohawk Tannery, a factory that produced leather for sixty years. Now, the city is considering a private-public partnership to clean it up, but the details are still up for debate.

Hiveminder.com

The Environmental Protection Agency wants public input on its recommendation for cleaning up a toxic waste site in Nashua.

The Mohawk Tannery is a proposed Superfund site in a residential area along the Nashua River. It produced tanned leather from the 1920s to the 1980s, leaving acidic sludge, dioxanes and arsenic in the ground.

www.infrastructurereportcard.org

The American Society of Civil Engineers has released their 2017 report card on New Hampshire’s infrastructure -- and the state is far from the honor roll.

CorpsNewEngland / Flickr CC

New Hampshire safety officials have announced a new project to beef up flood planning. A new database will look to maximize return on dollars invested in flood mitigation.

The problem is that data on where money has been spent to repair flood damages isn’t kept in one place: some is with the federal flood insurance program, some comes from FEMA disaster declarations, and still more is with local towns.

The Department of Environmental Services is working to have  a former auto-parts factory and landfill in Farmington declared a Superfund site. DES officials are confident the site will be accepted into the federal program.