hate Crime

Hate rhetoric online has been linked to several recent incidents of mass violence in the United States and internationally. But even when this kind of speech doesn't lead to physical harm, it is damanging to the targeted group and the wider community. We look at how hateful language has impacted people over time, and what our legal system says. 

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

We talk to religious leaders, educators, and the director of a new civil rights unit at the N.H. Dept. of Justice about the killings this weekend at a Pittsburgh synagogue that left 11 dead and several wounded, including four police officers. This latest mass shooting occurs amid an apparent surge in hate-related speech and crimes in this country, as well as calls for political unity. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

A Jackson woman accused of a hate crime says her actions inside a hotel lobby had nothing to do with the alleged victims’ religion.

In a preliminary hearing on Friday in Carroll County Superior Court, Priscilla Protasowicki told Judge Amy Ignatius, “I have no problem with their national origin, their religion. I have absolutely no issue with that.”

NHPR Photo

A woman from Jackson, New Hampshire, is being accused of a hate crime for allegedly assaulting two people in an effort to remove them from her family's business because of their religion and perceived national origin.

Priscilla Protasowicki, 32, was indicted on two counts of simple assault following an incident at the Covered Bridge Riverview Lodge in April.