Government | New Hampshire Public Radio

Government

N. Mendal Shafer

The United States government spreads power across three branches of government: the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Why three branches? What does each branch do that the others cannot? And how do they work together? 

Today’s Civics Short, designed for middle schoolers but fun for all, takes a closer look at the who, what, where, and whys of the Census.

Centers for Disease Control

The CDC, or the Centers for Disease Control, have been in the news a lot lately. But what is the CDC? And what does it do? Today’s Civics Short, designed for middle schoolers but fun for all, takes a closer look at the who, what, where, and whys of the CDC.

When you think about civics and government, you probably think about voting and politicians, but the government touches every part of your life from birth to death. Today, we look at birth. What does it take to be born an American citizen? And then, once you are, how do you prove it?

Then, the story of how tourism on Mount Washington became a model for mountain tourism nationally.

Who Needs Counties

May 3, 2019
Library of Congress; New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station

Counties are the "forgotten" part of government, but why do they matter?

Town Meeting Explained

Mar 15, 2019

Town meetings are a New Hampshire institution. It’s where all the year’s business is voted on by citizens in town halls, gyms, and community centers around the state. But for the uninitiated, town meeting can be confusing. Civics 101: New Hampshire helps break it down.

Then, Sam Evans-Brown introduces us to pirate trails.

Civics 101: New Hampshire, our local look at how state government works, brings us a look at the governor. Not our current governor specifically, but the office of the governor itself. What does the NH state governor do? And what makes our governor position different than in other states?

Then, a thought experiment: How fast could people go before the combustion engine and other technologies drastically increased the speed of the human race? And how did they pull it off?

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Nashua is the most diverse city in New Hampshire, with the state’s largest population of foreign-born residents.  Today on Word of Mouth, we’re exploring how immigrants decide to build a life in Nashua… and what that has meant for them and for the city.

 

Then, we’re going way back in time to look at how Magna Carta shaped the American democratic project.

There's only one place in the world that you can find the axolotl—the Mexican salamander—in the wild. This creature is the living embodiment of the Aztec god of heavenly fire, of lightning and the underworld.But the wild axolotl’s fate might be bound to the Aztecs by more than myth in a story from Outside/In.

Then, the Executive Council. What is it? Why do we have it? And what does it do?

Todd Bookman/NHPR

There’s a duplex in the town of Hudson, set back from the road, surrounded by trees. One half is vacant; Mandy Whitaker lives in the other half. She admits it’s not much to look at.

Ben McLeod via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/2xMv5

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Joe Shlabotnik via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/d6GCKA

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6.14.17: Civics 101 & Threshold

Jun 14, 2017
Kabsik Park via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/dhTjZ

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6.13.17: Civics 101 & Threshold

Jun 13, 2017
U.S. Geological Survey via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/kj623W

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6.12.17: Civics 101 & The Threshold Podcast

Jun 12, 2017
NPS / Jacob W. Frank | Public Domain / https://flic.kr/p/ThR1AE

On today's show:

  • Civics 101 - Declaring War
  • "'Please Call Stella': Capturing English, from Afrikaans to Zulu." Producer Rebecca Sheir taks a look -- and listen -- inside the world's largest online database of English accents. Listen again at prx.org.
  • All this week we're playing episodes from the first season of the podcast Threshold. Today we talk to the host of the podcast, Amy Martin and share Episode 1. Listen to this Episode 1 here. To learn more, see photos, and listen to bonus interviews, head to thresholdpodcast.org.

davidd via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/73o3Lh

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Malcolm Logan via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/aXceDr

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Blueboxes via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/SspmV6

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4.18.17: Vetoes & Kinan Azmeh

Apr 18, 2017
Tim Evanson via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/cVHCid

On today's show:

  • Civics 101: Veto
  • "Crazy Bet" from producer Nate DiMeo and The Memory Palace. Listen again at PRX.org. 
  • Clarinetist and composer Kinan Azmeh was born in Damascus, but now lives in New York, where he wakes up to bad news each day. He’s going to be performing with the Kinan Azmeh CityBand at Phillips Academy Exeter tonight at 7:00pm and at the West Claremont Center for Music and the Arts tomorrow, April 19th at 6:30pm to celebrate the band's 10th season together. This is our previous conversation with Kinan and composer Kareem Roustom, recorded in 2013.
  • "The Gift of Music" from Masumi Hayashi-Smith and the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. Listen again at PRX.org. 

Urban Strategies via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/gaw1RS

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Andy Field via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/c7VEL

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James Yu via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/rZ3TL

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3.13.17: Civics 101 & The Stranger in the Woods

Mar 13, 2017
Bureau of Land Management Oregon and Washington via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/itv23E

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James Cridland via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/Wd54U

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Episode 2: White House Press Corps

Jan 26, 2017
Logan Shannon / New Hampshire Public Radio

What's it really like for a journalist stationed at the White House? We go inside the press briefing room with NPR's Senior White House Correspondent, Scott Horsley.

Question? Comments? Tag your responses #civics101pod on social media and we'll try to investigate! And remember to send us your civics questions by filling out the form below. 

aveira via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/6Myi84

In the first 100 days of his presidency, FDR passed a staggering seventy six pieces of legislation. Barack Obama, passed just 11. On today’s show we’ll look into partisan politics and the changing presidential mandate, and why the first 100 days is a metric worth looking at.

And, while most ski mountains in New England are facing the effects of a warming climate, another problem is slowly developing: aging chairlifts.

Plus we’ll check in with chamber pop band San Fermin before they play House of Blues in Boston this Saturday.

Episode 1: Chief of Staff

Jan 20, 2017
Logan Shannon

We're all familiar with the title, but what does a White House Chief of Staff actually do? What does the daily routine entail? And how much power does the position hold?  Our inaugural episode covers the basics of the President's gatekeeper.

Question? Comments? Tag your responses #civics101pod on social media and we'll try to investigate! And remember to send us your civics questions by filling out the form below. 

onepinkhippo via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8oatHS

In Australia, there is a small marsupial called the antechinus. It looks a lot like an ordinary mouse, but has an extraordinary life-cycle. Today, we discover a host of incredible organisms that illustrate the absurdity and elegance of evolution.

Plus, a regulatory conundrum over catfish. At a moment when the political divide is as wide as it's ever been, some republicans and democrats are actually coming together - over a bottom-feeder.

PROJes Via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/5vQAxc

When you’re on vacation or in an unfamiliar part of town looking for something to eat, you might look up restaurant reviews on Yelp to help narrow your choices. But now, prisoners across the country are also gravitating toward the platform and describing their experiences in jail. Review platforms like Yelp have become an unexpected online space for people to make the prison system more transparent while simultaneously fulfilling a personal and therapeutic void.

hillary h via flickr Creative Commons

USA Today recently published the U.S. Senate handbook, a 380 page document of rules intended to keep Senate offices running smoothly. On today’s show, from carpet color to telephone hold music, we reveal the handbook’s most confounding regulations.

Plus, ‘tis the season of ghosts, witches, and vampires. We’ll explore how cultures around the world interpret the supernatural.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

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