Elizabeth Warren | New Hampshire Public Radio

Elizabeth Warren

  • U.S. Senator first elected in 2012.
  • Democrat from Massachusetts.
  • Former law professor, consumer advocate
  • Age: 70

Updated at 11:15 a.m. ET

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren formally backed former Vice President Joe Biden for president on Wednesday, over a month after she ended her own campaign, extending a string of big endorsements as party leaders rally around the presumptive Democratic nominee.

"In this moment of crisis, it's more important than ever that the next president restores Americans' faith in good, effective government — and I've seen Joe Biden help our nation rebuild," Warren said in a tweet.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren ended her bid for the presidency on Thursday, acknowledging her place as the last major female candidate in the race "and all those little girls who are gonna have to wait four more years."

Josh Rogers | NHPR

Sen. Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigieg finished in the top two spots in the New Hampshire Democratic Primary last night, beating out two candidates who had, at various times over the last year, looked like front-runners: Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden.

Now, their supporters are looking to move on from disappointing New Hampshire results.

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

This weekend, thousands of volunteers for Sen. Elizabeth Warren knocked on doors across New Hampshire. The Warren campaign has been banking on this moment - in the final hours of the campaign here - to capitalize on months of grassroots organizing and turn undecided voters into Warren supporters.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

It's the final stretch before the first primary ballots will be cast in New Hampshire, and candidates are crisscrossing the state to make their final case to voters here. Bookmark this page for updates on what the candidates are up to in these final days, what Granite State voters are saying, and more.

Click here for Part 2 of our Primary Countdown Blog.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

When it comes to abortion rights support, there is little daylight between the Democrats running for president. That much became clear quickly at the ‘Our Rights, Our Courts’ forum in Concord Saturday sponsored by several abortion-rights groups including the Center for Reproductive Rights.

Allegra Boverman | NHPR

With just days left in her final campaign push in New Hampshire, Sen. Elizabeth Warren is trying to win over voters with a promise to unite the Democratic Party.

You can’t outscroll them.

Political ads are bombarding social media in New Hampshire right now, as presidential candidates try to squeeze in as much digital facetime as they can in the lead up to Tuesday’s primary.

  

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

The confusion over the results from Monday night's Iowa Caucuses kept most candidates from announcing a clear victory Tuesday morning. And it left voters in New Hampshire trying to make sense of where the campaigns stand, and what it means in the countdown to next week's primary. 

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

Like many presidential campaigns, the campaign of Sen. Elizabeth Warren deploys lots of tools to try to educate and inform its volunteers. There are policy books, fliers, and, for the past four months in Concord, there's night school.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

President Trump’s impeachment proceedings have only been before the U.S. Senate for one day, but with four senators running for president, they are already affecting life on the ground in early voting states like New Hampshire.

NHPR

In an interview Sunday with NHPR, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders declined to elaborate on a dispute with Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren that kicked off a broader debate this week over gender and electability. But Sanders did weigh in on the obstacles facing female candidates.

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

In their effort to woo voters before next month’s primary, Democratic Presidential candidates have come out with an array of policy plans, including ones to revitalize the rural United States. NHPR’s Sarah Gibson has been looking at what these plans might mean for rural New Hampshire and talking to voters about their concerns.

Ali Oshinskie/NHPR

Washington's escalating conflict and crisis with Iran has become a central focus of the presidential race. Voters are expressing concern, and the Democratic candidates are talking about it on the campaign trail in New Hampshire.

As other candidates report significant increases in fundraising, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren raised $21.2 million in the final three months of 2019, according to her presidential campaign, a drop from the $24.7 million she raised in the previous fundraising period.

The figure is also less than the totals that Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, former Vice President Joe Biden and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg took in between September and December.

Campaigns are reporting fundraising in three-month windows.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Sen. Elizabeth Warren spent the majority of a campaign stop in Concord Thursday responding to voters’ questions about her plans and her potential appeal to independent and moderate voters.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

WBUR has released a poll showing South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg leading the pack in the New Hampshire primary race.

The poll also looked at how New Hampshire primary voters, both Democrat and Republican, feel about topics like immigration and impeachment.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren drew a stark ideological contrast between herself and political rivals on Thursday in a speech on her economic plans at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

The question of how Democrats define themselves – beyond opposing President Trump – is one that New Hampshire primary voters will soon face.  And as primary day creeps closer, some leading presidential candidates are working to put their differences in sharper relief. And perhaps no two candidates better illustrate the different approaches to those questions than Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg, both of whom campaigned in the state Friday.

With the late entrance of former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick into the 2020 presidential race, there are now four candidates from neighboring states campaigning in New Hampshire. In addition to Patrick, that list includes Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with NHPR’s Senior Political Reporter Josh about the track record of candidates from next door in the New Hampshire primary.

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

Last Democratic presidential primary, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire decisively, getting 60 percent of the vote and galvanizing his supporters across the country. But this year, many Sanders supporters say they see another progressive option in Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren. Recent polls show the two candidates are largely drawing from the same pool of voters for their support.

As Primary Day draws closer, how are those voters navigating that choice?

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

Senator Elizabeth Warren has called herself “a capitalist to the bones” and sees no contradiction between that description and her plans for expanding government, raising taxes and increasing regulation. 

“Without rules, capitalism is theft. So for me, it's about making sure we have a set of rules so that you really get competition so that nobody gets cheated, so that everybody has an opportunity,” she said during an Exchange 2020 Forum. 

Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren was interviewed on The Exchange Candidate Forum this week.

Ahead of the hour-long interview, the Massachusetts senator was asked to deliver her "elevator pitch" — while she was actually in the elevator — on why she should be the next President of the United States.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

Update: Elizabeth Warren released her funding plan for Medicare For All on Nov. 1. You can read that here.   

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren says she's working on a plan that will detail how to pay for her Medicare For All proposal.

The Democratic presidential candidate was interviewed on NHPR's 2020 Candidate Forum Series Wednesday morning.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

Our New Hampshire Primary 2020 Candidate Forum series continues with U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, before a live audience. Listen or watch the interview below to get her views on the economy, taxes, foreign policy, climate change, and more. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Next Forum: Elizabeth Warren on October 30

New Hampshire Public Radio, in collaboration with New Hampshire PBS, is holding series of forums with presidential primary candidates to explore in-depth the issues that impact New Hampshire voters. Forums are open to the public, broadcast on NHPR live, and then broadcast on New Hampshire PBS.  

After a long, steady rise in the polls, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren is now vying for front-runner status with former Vice President Joe Biden. On Tuesday night, more moderate candidates took aim at her progressive policy positions as unrealistic and expensive.

"Medicare for All" — the single-payer health care plan supported by both Warren and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders — was the main topic in this moderate-progressive fight.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

Drug recovery centers first became a stop on the campaign trail in the 2016 New Hampshire primary, and they’re playing an especially important role this year, as presidential hopefuls unveil their plans to tackle the opioid crisis.

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

As Congressional Democrats launch an impeachment inquiry into President Trump, many presidential candidates are voicing their support. But impeachment, so far, is getting mixed reactions from Democratic voters in New Hampshire.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire Democrats — and 19 candidates seeking their party’s nomination for president — were in Manchester this weekend for the state Democratic Party convention. For attendees it was a chance to express their commitment to unseating President Trump. But it was also a chance for activists to consider — and reconsider — which sort of candidate might be most up to that task.

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