Electric Bills

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Eversource wants to increase its electric rate to cover the cost of major upgrades made over the past decade. The company began the lengthy rate review process with a request to the state Public Utilities Commission on Friday.

NEPOOL

Energy can be tough to understand. When we flip a light switch, we know the lights should come on. But we might not know where that power came from – or why it costs what it costs.

In New England, much of those costs are controlled by a select group of stakeholders – called the New England Power Pool, or NEPOOL.

NEPOOL is now facing criticism for a lack of transparency, and for decisions that could be raising the already high cost of energy in the region.

creative commons

Eversource’s residential customers will likely see their bills increase in February, after the utility asks state regulators to approve a proposed rate hike this week.

New Hampshire's largest utility says it needs to increase its default electric service rate for the first half of next year by about half a cent per kilowatt-hour.  

FILE

New Hampshire residents who fall behind on their gas and electric bills have some protection now that winter weather has set in.

During cold-weather months, disconnecting gas or electric service can be dangerous.

So last week, different rules for doing so kicked in.

New Hampshire Timberland Owners Association

Governor Chris Sununu is standing by his veto of a bill to boost the biomass industry – even as more of the wood-burning plants say they may shut down as a result.

A wood buyer for Bridgewater Biomass confirmed Tuesday that the plant took the veto as a signal about the industry's future, and stopped buying new wood in late June.

The Pinetree Power plants in Tamworth and Bethlehem did the same, according to spokeswoman Carol Churchill of their parent company, ENGIE North America.

Eversource/Business Wire

Eversource is currently trying to buy its second water company in the past year.

The region’s biggest electric utility hopes to provide water service to hundreds of thousands of customers across four New England states.

It would still be a small swath of the overall water system – but that could change. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The legislature is debating whether utilities should tell customers how much of their electric bills go toward renewable energy. 

Monthly energy bills already show how much each customer pays for things like transmission. Now, Rep. Michael Harrington is proposing adding a line, showing the cost per ratepayer of the Renewable Portfolio Standard, or RPS.

Thomas Gehrke / Flickr Creative Commons

 

In his inaugural address last week, Gov. Chris Sununu made it clear he thinks the state must — and can — act to reduce the state's high cost of electricity.

“We can’t be passive anymore," Sununu said. "We have to find the right solutions to get it done and get it done our way. Do we need to look at Northern Pass? You bet we do — 1,100 megawatts of clean, renewable energy? How do we say no to that when we have the highest rates in the country? We can help ratepayers.”

File photo

For most New Hampshire residents, electricity should be less expensive this winter than last. At least, that's the indication based on recent rate requests from some of the state's largest electric utilities.

File photo

New Hampshire Electric Cooperative and Liberty Utilities say customers will see their bills decrease, effective May 1.

The change is the result of a decrease in the power rate.

For co-op customers, it comes out to about $23.67 less per month for a residential member using 500 kilowatts per month. For a customer using 1,000 kilowatts per month, it's about $47.33.

At Liberty, the reduction will mean a $46 decrease per month for an average residential customer.

iStock Photo/Thinkstock

  A bill to take New Hampshire out of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, has been changed in the House Committee on Science, Technology and Energy.

It would now maintain New Hampshire’s participation in the program but would allocate all of the money raised by the program away from renewable energy projects and into electric rate relief.

Right now, the state puts four out of every five dollars it gets per carbon allowance into rate subsidies.

NH Energy Wars

Jun 12, 2013

Fifteen years ago, New Hampshire embarked on a dramatic experiment, deregulating electricity. The idea was to bring competition to power production; a sector where typically just a handful of highly-regulated utilities dominated. These days, Granite Staters are being pursued by a variety of power suppliers, from all over.  And their efforts are paying off, with more and morer customers switching from the state’s largest utility, PSNH to new providers.

Flkr Creative Commons / PSNH

Public Service of New Hampshire has asked for a change in how much it charges consumers for electricity.

PSNH asked the Public Utilities Commission for a ten percent decrease in the price it charges for electricity. But any savings consumers might see would be eaten up by a simultaneous increase in the Stranded Cost Recovery charge.