Eagle | New Hampshire Public Radio

Eagle

On the Lookout for Bald Eagles in N.H.

Jan 29, 2019

We examine results from New Hampshire's 39th Annual Mid-winter Eagle Population Survey and learn more about these iconic birds, whose numbers in the state have been growing.  N.H. Audubon monitors bald eagles as part of an annual contract with the NH Fish and Game Department's Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program.  Bald eagles are now listed as “Special Concern” in the state since their official removal from NH’s Threatened and Endangered Wildlife List in March 2017. And we look at the impact of the eagle's success on another beloved symbol of New Hampshire, the loon.  

Courtesy Szoke Hunor via Flirckr/Creative Commons.

Love stories abound this time of year, so what better time to revisit Something Wild’s First Bitten series where we explore the story of what made biologists fall in love with biology? This story is about a boy and a girl, and the great outdoors.

Chris Martin / Courtesy of NH Audubon

November is a great time to spot golden eagles. They are a rare sight in New Hampshire, but they do pass through the state on their annual migration. Right now they’re on their way south to winter in the central Appalachians. They’ll pass back through the state in March on their way to Labrador and northern Quebec to nest.

Golden eagles are sometimes confused with young bald eagles, but there are differences. When bald eagles are in flight, they hold their wings flat like a plank, but golden eagle wings have a slight ‘V’ shape.

Peter Gray / NH Audubon

 

It seems bald eagles are finding a lot to like about New Hampshire.

So far this year, New Hampshire Audubon has identified 39 nests across the state. That is a 30 percent increase over last year and a significant jump from the 1990s when there was only one breeding pair. The birds are attracted to the state's abundant lakes and rivers, especially the Connecticut River Watershed.

Chris Martin / Courtesy of NH Audubon

November is a great time to spot golden eagles. They are a rare sight in New Hampshire, but they do pass through the state on their annual migration. Right now they’re on their way south to winter in the central Appalachians. They’ll pass back through the state in March on their way to Labrador and northern Quebec to nest.

Golden eagles are sometimes confused with young bald eagles, but there are differences. When bald eagles are in flight, they hold their wings flat like a plank, but golden eagle wings have a slight ‘V’ shape.

Chris Martin / Courtesy of NH Audubon

November is a great time to spot golden eagles. They are a rare sight in New Hampshire, but they do pass through the state on their annual migration. Right now they’re on their way south to winter in the central Appalachians. They’ll pass back through the state in March on their way to Labrador and northern Quebec to nest.

Golden eagles are sometimes confused with young bald eagles, but there are differences. When bald eagles are in flight, they hold their wings flat like a plank, but golden eagle wings have a slight ‘V’ shape.

New Hampshire Fish and Game Department officers and a wildlife rehabilitator have nursed a juvenile bald eagle back to health.

The healthy bird was released in Squam Lake's Long Island last week, near its nest.

The Eagle-Tribune reports a conservation officer rescued the bird in August. It had a broken leg, possibly caused by falling out of the nest or having a rough landing while learning to fly.