Demographics | New Hampshire Public Radio

Demographics

Courtesy of Nicole McKenzie

Federal workers and local volunteers are trying to get as many people as possible in New Hampshire to fill out to 2020 U.S. census. Time is running out for the first part of that process, which is focused on getting people to fill out the survey themselves before a census worker shows up at their door in August.

NHPR's Sarah Gibson has been checking in with census workers. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with her about how it's going in the Granite State.

Migration continues to be the number one cause of population growth in New Hampshire.

Kristine Bundschuh is a Ph.D. student of sociology and researcher at the UNH Carsey School of Public Policy who’s recently co-authored a paper on migration patterns.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Bundschuh about why people choose to move to the Granite State and why they decide to stay.

Sara Plourde, NHPR

The 2020 U.S. Census is underway. The dicennial population count affects political power on a local, federal and state level, and it guides billions of dollars of federal spending.

 

Here's what you need to know about the census, why it matters in New Hampshire, and how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting it.

Courtesy of U.S. Census

 

The U.S. Census Bureau is struggling to hire enough people in New Hampshire to help with the once-in-a-decade population count later this year.

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

  Democratic presidential hopefuls are campaigning all over New Hampshire, and they’re spending a lot of time in areas once considered Republican strongholds. The candidates are hoping to capitalize on a demographic shift underway in rural New Hampshire that could have big political implications.

 

A nonprofit advocacy group says the number of people experiencing homelessness in New Hampshire has dropped in the last two years, though homelessness among students and in some counties is on the rise.

The New Hampshire Coalition to End Homelessness bases some of their calculations on counts taken every January across the state. These suggest overall homelessness has decreased by five percent, but Coalition director Cathy Kuhn says the homelessness count from January 2019 doesn't reflect the increasing demand on shelters.

“Every shelter is across the state is reporting at and over capacity,” Kuhn says. “It’s always important that we’re looking at multiple sources of data to understand a complex issue like homelessness.”

 

UNH

A new study from the University of New Hampshire's Carsey School shows more than one in five potential 2020 New Hampshire primary voters will be new to the electorate. The study says that's just one of several factors in what it terms a changing political landscape.

Population growth in New Hampshire has been fairly modest in the last 20 years or so, but there’s been a substantial change in who is actually living in the state.

That’s according to a recent report from the UNH Carsey School of Public Policy. Senior demographer Ken Johnson is the author of that report. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Johnson about how shifting demographics in New Hampshire could affect the state's voting population in the upcoming presidential election.

A new database released Tuesday offers a detailed look at the health of aging adults in New Hampshire.

The report, funded by the Tufts Health Plan Foundation, provides town-level data on 166 different health indicators for adults over 60 in New Hampshire.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A bill that would create a position for a state demographer passed the N.H. House today.

 

House Bill 1817 would require the person who gets the job to work closely with U.S. Census data and compile projections on things like how diverse the state is and how it's aging.

 

Representative Erin Hennessey is the bill’s prime sponsor. She says it also calls for a commission made up of legislators and Granite Staters with demographic expertise.

 

UNH Carsey School

New Hampshire Public Radio kicked off a news series, The Balance, last weekIt looks at the costs, benefits and tradeoffs of life in New Hampshire, including why people move to -- or out of -- the state. Last year, New Hampshire saw its biggest population increase since before the Great Recession. Here to talk about what's behind that trend, is Ken Johnson, senior demographer with UNH's Carsey School.

N.H. Bill Would Establish State Demographer

Jan 24, 2018
NHPR File Photo

New Hampshire's demographics are changing, and some lawmakers want to make sure policy makers keep that in mind.

The House Executive Departments and Administration Committee is holding a public hearing Wednesday on a bill that would create a new position of state demographer. The bill also would create a commission to develop long-term migration goals and would require lawmakers to consider how proposed legislation would affect the state's population trends.

Flickr

  New Hampshire has joined a growing list of states where more white people are dying than are being born.

That’s according to a University of New Hampshire study released Tuesday, which found 17 states experiencing this demographic shift known as “white natural decrease.”

That’s up from just four states in 2004.

Wendy Nelson / Flickr/CC

We're talking with millennials from the state for an update on whether and why more young adults are leaving the New Hampshire than coming to it, and what it means for the economy.

  This program was originally broadcast on 3/10/16.

  

AP

Ronald Reagan clobbered Jimmy Carter in the 1980 New Hampshire presidential election. Four years later, he did the same to Walter Mondale. So resounding were those thumpings, Carter won just two towns in the state, Mondale five. 

Republican supremacy in the state did not start with Reagan, nor did it end with him. But Reagan’s two victories may represent the GOP high-water mark in New Hampshire presidential contests. The question now is: Has Republican support in the state bottomed out, or could it continue to fall in 2016? And what might Donald Trump, this year's unconventional GOP nominee, mean for this trend?

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Lawmakers are receiving a series of briefings on New Hampshire's labor market, economy and demographic challenges.

Economists and other experts are making presentations Monday to House and Senate lawmakers who sit on key committees that determine how money is raised and spent in New Hampshire. The briefings are open to the public and will be live streamed on the state's website.

  New Hampshire’s foreign-born population continues to grow, though not as quickly as the national rate.

An analysis of census data from the Pew Charitable Trusts shows the percentage of foreign-born residents in New Hampshire has risen to 5.4 percent.

nhpolicy.org

The New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies writes a report of their annual survey of the major policy issues and critical questions shaping New Hampshire's future. The data explain where New Hampshire has been, forecast where it is heading, and explore how current trends and policy choices facing the state will affect the well-being of its citizens.

GUESTS:

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates New Hampshire’s population grew by only .1% last year. That’s fewer than 2000 people added since 2012. That’s among the slowest rates of growth in the nation.


Newly released data from the US Census Bureau says Americans are on the move again – the country’s rate of domestic migration in 2012 hit a five-year high.

The story of migration in northern New England, however, is slightly more complicated. According to the results of the latest American Community Survey, New Hampshire saw a rise in migration after several years of decline. But Massachusetts and Maine saw decline.

There’s a term in demographic studies, “natural decrease” – it’s when a county has fewer births than it has deaths, and it’s happening in parts of New Hampshire.

LGBT in the United States: A New Breakdown

Nov 1, 2012
Credit jA-rg via Flickr Creative Commons

Recently, the Williams Institute published the largest single study investigating the U.S. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer population.