Democrats

CNN

Twelve Democratic presidential candidates will debate tonight in Ohio. The debate is sponsored by CNN and the New York Times, and it will be carried live on New Hampshire Public Radio and NPR.

The candidates on the stage Tuesday night: Joe Biden, Cory Booker, Pete Buttigieg, Julian Castro, Tulsi Gabbard, Kamala Harris, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O'Rourke, Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer, Elizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang.

Visit NHPR's 2020 Primary Dashboard for more information on the candidates.

Angela Hsieh / NPR

Democratic presidential hopefuls debate in Detroit in Part II of the second round of debates on Wednesday night. The debate televised on CNN starts at 8 p.m. EST. Click here for coverage of the first night of the debate.

Getty Images / NPR

Ten Democratic presidential candidates are debating Tuesday night in Detroit. It's Part I of a two-night debate schedule--the second comes Wednesday night on CNN. 

Visit NHPR's Coverage Page for the 2020 First-in-the-Nation N.H. Primary

Todd Bookman/NHPR

During a stop in Keene on Tuesday, Democratic Presidential candidate Kamala Harris laid out a plan she says will reduce gun violence in America.

The California senator told a crowd at Keene State College that if elected, she would give Congress 100 days to enact “reasonable gun safety laws.” Without action, she would seek to use executive powers.

Lauren Chooljian / NHPR

Denise Bowdidge would like it to be known that she is a big fan of President Donald Trump.

 

“He’s not afraid, he’s a man of strength and encouragement and hope for people for the future,” she told an NHPR reporter one August afternoon.

Those same feelings propelled her to drive across the 1st Congressional District, from her home in Bedford, to Portsmouth, where Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, was in town to endorse Republican Eddie Edwards.

At the time, Edwards was locked in a heated primary battle with opponent Andy Sanborn, and he was courting Trump supporters hard.

“The president is doing one hell of a job in Washington,” Edwards said. “One hell of a job.”

Lauren Chooljian / NHPR

U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen has officially endorsed Chris Pappas in the race for the 1st Congressional District, a move that has stirred up some drama among other Democrats in the crowded field.

Shaheen and Pappas announced the endorsement together Tuesday at the American Legion Sweeney Post in Manchester. While Pappas supporters munched on chicken tenders from The Puritan, the Pappas family’s restaurant, Shaheen told the crowd she’s known Pappas since he was in high school, when he worked on her 1996 campaign for governor.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

A handful of New Hampshire House Democrats are in Alabama for the much-talked about special U.S. Senate election between Republican Roy Moore and Democrat Doug Jones.

House Minority Leader Steve Shurtleff says he organized the trip a few months ago, after Moore won the Republican primary for the Senate seat left vacant by Jeff Sessions, now Attorney General.

 

A new poll from the University of New Hampshire says many New Hampshire residents don't think voter fraud has an impact on local elections.

The latest Granite State Poll tackles a topic that's been front of mind for many New Hampshire residents lately, especially Republicans. 

“A Better Deal” --  That's how national Democratic leaders sum up their new pitch to voters, promising to tackle economic and political inequality.  Among their ideas: breaking up consolidated corporate power and lifting the minimum wage to fifteen dollars.  Reactions have been mixed.  We talk with Granite State Democrats about whether this new plan takes the party in the right direction.


Harris & Ewing Collection (Library of Congress)

You don’t have to look far for examples of deteriorating civility between opposing sides of the political aisle, in New Hampshire and nationally. But one local lawmaker is pitching a new tradition meant to bring Republicans and Democrats together — by pitting them against each other on the softball field.

Flickr

  The newly appointed deputy chairman of the Democratic National Committee says the Democratic party can't spend all of its energy focusing on Republican President Donald Trump.

Minnesota U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison spoke Saturday to a gathering of New Hampshire Democrats about the future of the party and its efforts to fight back against Republicans. Ellison was named deputy DNC chair after he lost the chairman's race to former Labor Secretary Tom Perez.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

While angry protesters have been flooding town hall-style events across the country being held by Republican congressmen, the scene at today’s meeting in Concord felt more like a therapy session for beleaguered New Hampshire Democrats.

Hundreds hoping to hear Sens. Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan piled into an auditorium on the campus of the New Hampshire Technical Institute. They bore signs, pink "Pussyhats" and their fears about the next four years.

Hannah McCarthy

Chelsea Clinton is campaigning for her mother, Hillary Clinton, in New Hampshire on Friday. She'll make stops at Keene State and Dartmouth College, just the latest in a series of college campus visits for the Clinton campaign in the state.

The youth could mean a boost for Clinton in the New Hampshire polls -- but only if college-aged voters bother to cast their ballot. 

2016 Presidential Race: Uncharted Territory

Oct 10, 2016
Josh Rogers NHPR

We take a moment, fewer than 30 days from the election, to evaluate the recent turn of events in the Presidential race.  An 11-year old video, in which Republican nominee Donald Trump talked crudely about groping women, prompts N.H.'s Senator Kelly Ayotte to join a growing wave of Republican lawmakers unwilling to vote for the Republican nominee, or even calling for him to step down. We review the second presidential debate featuring questions from undecided voters as well as the two moderators.  And we consider whether the Republican party can hang on to control in Congress, and how the GOP, seemingly in crisis, can rebound.


The Democratic candidates for governor took part in a WGIR radio debate Wednesday. Among other things, the candidates discussed marijuana legalization.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

The once-polite democratic presidential races has turned bitter. Sanders's supporters are increasingly agitated about the nomination process, while Clinton's campaign says the numbers strongly favor her and it's time to unify. And some activists want the DNC chair to resign, while others say all this just helps Donald Trump.


Political Turmoil in the 2016 Presidential Race

Mar 14, 2016
Allegra Boverman / Flickr/CC

The 2016 Presidential Race just finished one of the most tumultuous weeks of campaigning in recent memory. As Donald Trump continues to roll toward the Republican nomination, clashes at his campaign events continue, with some of the most heated occurring this weekend in Chicago. Meanwhile, on the Democratic side, a tightening race in Illinois is giving the Sanders campaign hope for another come-from-behind victory over Hillary Clinton. 

GUESTS: 

(Note: Tonight's debate, moderated by PBS NewsHour anchors Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff, will be simulcast on CNN and NPR and streamed live on NPR.org. NPR's Tamara Keith will be part of the debate broadcast, providing analysis during and after the event.)

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton meet Thursday night on a debate stage in Milwaukee. It's their first face-to-face matchup since Tuesday's New Hampshire primary where Sanders beat Clinton by more than 20 points.

Jason Moon for NHPR

On Friday night, New Hampshire Democrats gathered in Manchester for the annual 100 Club Dinner. The event provided a chance for Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton to make closing arguments ahead of next the Primary next Tuesday.

Friday night’s Mcintyre-Shaheen 100 Club Dinner was a who’s who of prominent Democrats, both local and national. Among the speakers were National Democratic Party Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Congresswoman Ann Kuster, Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Governor Maggie Hassan, and of course Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton.

Associated Press

The Democratic candidates for president will take the stage at Saint Anselm College in Manchester Saturday night for New Hampshire’s first debate of the primary season.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley will take part in the debate, which will air on WMUR here in New Hampshire and ABC affiliates nationally.

The Democratic National Committee last week stripped WMUR of its co-sponsor status for the debate due to an ongoing labor dispute at the station.

Primary 2016: First Democratic Presidential Debate

Oct 14, 2015
cnn.com

Five presidential candidates faced off in Las Vegas in the first of six debates. With much of the focus on Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders these months, it was a chance for lagging candidates Martin O’Malley, Jim Webb, and Lincoln Chafee to get in the fight. We’ll recap the top moments and dig into the issues.

GUESTS:

  • Wayne Lesperance – professor and director of Masters of Public Policy at New England College
  • Josh Rogers – senior political reporter and Editor at New Hampshire Public Radio
     

matt2181 / Flickr/CC

This primary season, much of the attention has focused on the Republican side, given the many candidates and another upcoming debate.  But this weekend in New Hampshire, it’s the Democrats’ turn: at their annual state convention, the party’s presidential contenders are all expected.  We’ll look at the candidates and the issues.

GUESTS:

Shawn Calhoun/Flickr

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi will be the keynote speaker at a major Democratic fundraiser this weekend.

The McIntyre-Shaheen 100 Club Dinner is set for Sunday evening at the Radisson Hotel in Manchester.

Tickets for the event begin at $100-per-person. For $350, attendees can attend a VIP reception.

And at the high end of the scale, those purchasing tickets for $10,000 are given so-called majority maker status.

Democratic Party Dynamics Heading Into 2016

Feb 25, 2015
DonkeyHotey / Flickr/CC

Although attention has been focused on the GOP field of presidential hopefuls, there are also interesting developments among Democrats, including unflagging efforts among progressives to convince the seemingly unmoved Senator Elizabeth Warren to run.  We’ll look at these dynamics in the context of policy debates within the party.

GUESTS:

The Centrist Manifesto

Oct 21, 2013
davidking via flickr Creative Commons

Ever feel like the only way things get done in Washington is if there's a crisis? You're not alone. Bipartisanism is driving moderates out of the Senate according to a recent editorial from the Star Tribune.  Charles Wheelan is senior lecturer at Dartmouth, and the author of several books including Naked Economics. His newest is called The Centrist Manifesto and it’s the basis for a new centrist party designed to break congressional gridlock, find consensus, and restore faith in American politics.

Democrats: It's Time For A Woman President

Sep 27, 2013
Kevin Lamarque/ AFP/Getty Images

Democrats gathered in New Hampshire's largest city Friday's said the event wasn't designed to promote Hillary Rodham Clinton specifically. But Clinton supporters dominated the discussion hosted by EMILY's List, a group that works to elect female Democrats across the country.

Former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm said Clinton would be, quote, "the most qualified person to run for president, probably almost ever."

EMILY's List president Stephanie Schriock says several women could run for president in 2016, but Clinton rises above them all.

The Invisible Issues of Campaign 2012

Oct 16, 2012
Barack Obama via Flickr Creative Commons

Think about how anti-gay marriage rhetoric played a critical role in George W. Bush’s re-election in 2004, or how talking up a surging economy made Bill Clinton the first two-term democratic president since Franklin Roosevelt won in 1936.

Jonathan Lynch / NHPR

New Hampshire Democrats met in Manchester this morning at a Unity Breakfast to set the tone for the run up to the general election in November.

Gubernatorial candidate Maggie Hassan, her former challenger Jackie Cilley, and other Democratic candidates spoke at the party’s first major post-primary event.

In a show of solidarity, Jackie Cilley removed her own campaign button from her coat and pinned a Hassan button in its place, asking her supporters to do the same.

“We have one opportunity in this country to elect a pro-choice, Democratic woman governor. It’s here.”

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Perhaps the biggest surprise of last night was not that Democrat Jackie Cilley lost to her rival Maggie, Hassan, but by how big a margin. What was supposed to be a close race turned out to be a run-away.

This primary season the question has been: will democrats elect a candidate who hasn’t pledged to veto an income or sales tax? From the outset, Cilley has made not taking such a pledge the centerpiece of her campaign.

But with the very first poll returns it was clear that Cilley was in for a rough night. Later she took the podium to concede the race.

With just under a week before primary day the Democratic Candidates for Governor met in Goffstown for their first televised debate. But anyone hoping for clear contrasts between the two leading candidates --  former state Senators Maggie Hassan and Jackie Cilley -- were likely disappointed.

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