By Degrees | New Hampshire Public Radio

By Degrees

Community Power New Hampshire

More than 20 local governments sent a letter to the state’s Public Utilities Commission last week asking it to develop rules and regulations that would support community power programs.

These programs allow municipalities and counties to purchase power on behalf of residents and businesses within their jurisdiction. Advocates say this is one way to get more energy from renewable resources, and at possibly lower costs to ratepayers. 

Utilities would still be the ones to distribute that energy.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Despite some recent rain, New Hampshire’s drought is growing, causing wells to run dry across the state. And the hotter temperatures of a changing climate could make future droughts more likely. 

As part of NHPR’s By Degrees project, Annie Ropeik reports on how the dry conditions are affecting people who rely on well water, and what it would take to prepare for the future.  

Sean Hurley

The White Mountain Fritillary butterfly can only be found in one place on earth - above 4000 feet in the Presidential Range. A conservation effort is underway to make sure the insect can survive climate change… but scientists have only just begun to learn about the species and how it may be at risk.

As part of NHPR’s reporting project, By Degrees, NHPR’s Sean Hurley joined researchers atop Mount Washington to see four captive butterflies released back into the wild.

Nearly all regions of the three northern New England states are experiencing some level of abnormally dry conditions right now, with some areas in a moderate to extreme drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. And that's leading to the potential for wildfires.

Ken Watson / KenWatson.net

Update, Wednesday, Sept. 16: The risk of wildfires was “very high” Wednesday in New Hampshire and Maine. Officials say they've had reports of several small, deep-burning fires in the southern and central part of New Hampshire.

Smoke from Western wildfires is also still wafting over New England. Forecasters say it will make for a colorful sunset but isn't yet affecting air quality. 

NHPR staff

After taking the spotlight in the presidential primary, climate change policy is back in focus in New Hampshire's governor's race -- and not just as a partisan issue.

Energy is driving a wedge between the Democratic candidates competing in next week's primary, as well as with incumbent Republican Gov. Chris Sununu.

NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello spoke with energy and environment reporter Annie Ropeik, who’s heading up NHPR’s climate reporting project By Degrees, for more on the candidates’ views and the role this is playing in the race.

What Is The Promise of Green Hydrogen?

Aug 26, 2020
Q Hydrogen Solutions

Is there a way to combat climate change and keep that furnace in your basement? We learn about green hydrogen and examine if we can use it to take advantage of existing natural gas infrastructure as we wean ourselves off fossil fuels. We discuss the promise and pitfalls of green hydrogen and where these fit in the energy future of N.H. and the country. This program is part of NHPR’s By Degrees climate reporting initiative.
 

Airdate: Wednesday, August 26, 2020

U.S. Drought Monitor

State officials are asking residents to stop watering their lawns and washing their cars.

Taking these steps can protect the public’s water supply, and prevent a water shortage.

The most recent data from the U.S. Drought Monitor shows that almost half of the state is experiencing a moderate drought.

Other areas are experiencing either severe or abnormally dry conditions.

More than a hundred community water systems in the state are complying with these new restrictions.

Have You Considered Re-Wilding Your Lawn?

Aug 10, 2020

Have you ever questioned why you spend so much time mowing, raking, maybe even watering your lawn? We consider how lawns have become an intrinsic part of the American dream, what “re-wilding” your lawn might do for pollinators and the planet, and what you might plant instead. Sam Evans-Brown of NHPR's Outside/In is guest host.

Airdate: Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Are snow-making machines an example of climate adaptation, or an example of an emissions feedback loop? Does the fire risk posed by planting trees outweigh the benefits of their use as a carbon sink? Can the team talk big planet problems and still leave room for bad puns?

We’ll answer these questions and more climate queries on this special edition of Ask Sam.

PEXELS

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del viernes 24 de julio.

Las puedes escuchar en el siguiente audio y leerlas.

Una nota: este es el guion que usamos para grabar, por ende, podrás encontrar anotaciones diferentes en el texto. 

Equipo del estado recomienda involucrar la equidad en la industria de salud y más instituciones

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A continuación, pueden leer las noticias del jueves 23 de Julio.

También las puedes escuchar haciendo click en el siguiente audio. 

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes. 

Guía de reapertura de escuelas obtiene diferentes reacciones de sindicatos de maestros.

"I’ve Seen a Future Without Cars, and It’s Amazing" is the title of a New York Times opinion piece exploring how to reduce the space cars take up in New York City and improve the liveability of the city. We talk with the author to explore his ideas to transform our dependence on cars and consider whether we can make public spaces friendlier and more equitable here in New Hampshire. During the pandemic, bicycle sales have soared, and parking spots are being re-imagined as outdoor dining. Can we seize this moment, when we’re using our cars less, and make these changes permanent? Sam Evans-Brown of NHPR's Outside/In podcast is the host. 

  • Airdate: Wednesday, July 22, 2020

 

Kevin Gibbs, https://bit.ly/3eDwJW8

Ever since the threat of climate change was first made public, scientists have offered the possibility of a get-out-of-jail-free card: geoengineering. Reducing emissions is hard, so why not just engineer the Earth's atmosphere more to our liking?  Decades later, the science of geoengineering is still in its infancy, but a growing number of researchers are trying to change that. Should they?

Courtesy of Charles Driscoll

By Degrees is a new reporting project by NHPR shedding new light on climate change in New Hampshire. That project launches this week.

Air pollution is known to cause health problems like premature deaths, hospitalizations, heart attacks, and childhood asthma. It's also closely connected to climate change.

Syracuse University Professor Charles Driscoll joined NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello to talk about what air quality in New Hampshire can tell us about the extent of the problem.

Annie Ropeik

Just as more people than ever were beginning to wake up to the climate emergency, our lives collided with the coronavirus pandemic and a generational reckoning on racial justice. As part of NHPR's climate change reporting initiative, By Degrees, we discuss the overlap between climate justice and racial justice. We explore where environmental racism and injustice occur in our state and our region, and examine the challenges and solutions that these intersecting crises are bringing to light. Can our response to climate change address systemic racism and improve the lives of marginalized people? 

Air date: Wednesday, July 15, 2020.

Britta Greene for NHPR

By Degrees is a multi-year reporting project from NHPR that will tell stories about climate change in New Hampshire - its challenges, solutions and connections to other forces shaping our lives today. 

The project begins today. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with lead reporter Annie Ropeik, who covers energy, the environment and the Seacoast for NHPR, to learn more about the project's goals, what to expect this week and how listeners can contribute.  

A new, ongoing reporting project from New Hampshire Public Radio will take a deeper look at climate change in our state and the region, and its impact on policies, industries, communities and individuals.

The landmark Supreme Court ruling known as Massachusetts v. Environmental Protection Agency held that greenhouse gases were pollutants that could be regulated by the executive branch, and defined de facto federal climate policy in the United States for a decade.

Could it soon be reversed? 

Markerelli.com

Mark Erelli performed in studio for NHPR's The Folk Show ahead of his show at the Capitol Center for the Arts in Concord.

His song "By Degrees" featured all star musicians Rosanne Cash, Josh Ritter, Sheryl Crow, Anais Mitchell, Jefferson Hamer and Lori McKenne, and it was nominated for the American Industry's Best Song of the Year Award.

John Prine took the top prize for Summer's End from his Tree of Forgiveness album.