COVID & the Classroom | New Hampshire Public Radio

COVID & the Classroom

Credit Sara Plourde, NHPR

The coronavirus pandemic has upended the education system across the country, and in New Hampshire. School leaders are making some of the hardest decisions of their lives, and school staff, students, and families are navigating unknown territory that could have big consequences.

For some, the risks of contracting and spreading the virus are too high to return to school. But closing or limiting access to school can hamper kids’ education, deepen existing inequalities, and wreak havoc on family finances.

NHPR’s “COVID & the Classroom” tells the stories of how Granite Staters are weighing the necessity of employment and school with the realities of the pandemic. We’re here to answer your questions, investigate what’s not working, and share how communities and families are adapting.

Every few weeks, we ask you a new question to help inform our reporting. Click here to see our current question.

You can also email us tips and questions about what you’re seeing, or photos of remote learning at education@nhpr.org.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Schools in New Hampshire are getting an additional $45 million to help with coronavirus-related expenses.

Gov. Chris Sununu announced the funding at a press conference Thursday, following recommendations from lawmakers on the Governor’s Office for Economic Relief and Recovery Legislative Advisory Board.

Most of the money - which comes to the state from the federal CARES Act - will go to school districts directly, at a rate of approximately $200 per pupil.

Credit Courtesy of Cheryl Gaffney

Classrooms in New Hampshire have changed dramatically to reopen safely in the pandemic, and some of the biggest changes are in music class. Gone are the days of belting out songs shoulder to shoulder, sharing music stands, and swapping instruments. Instead, as NHPR’s Sarah Gibson reports, some schools are following new protocols to bring music back but keep COVID-19 risk low.


Photo Credit woodleywonderworks via Flickr Creative Commons

The Nashua School District is responding to pressure from parents and some school board members to hasten reopening plans after weeks of being almost entirely remote.

At a school board meeting on Tuesday night, Superintendent Jahmal Mosley presented the district’s metrics for moving between remote, hybrid, and in-person models. With transmission levels of COVID-19 now among some of the highest in the state, Mosley said Nashua meets the state's criteria for staying fully remote or hybrid.

Empty classroom
Pickpik

Superintendents across New Hampshire are warning of budget shortfalls and staff shortages as they navigate the coronavirus pandemic.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

The coronavirus pandemic has upended the education system across the country, and in New Hampshire. 

Get stories about COVID-19 in N.H. in your inbox - sign up for our newsletter today.

NHPR’s “COVID & the Classroom” tells the stories of how Granite Staters are weighing the necessity of employment and school with the realities of the pandemic. And we want to hear from you.

Courtesy Nicole McKenzie

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del lunes 5 de octubre. 

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Estado reporta 53 nuevos casos, 1 fallecimiento adicional y ninguna hospitalización

Un residente más de New Hampshire ha fallecido de COVID-19, y se anunciaron 53 [cincuenta y tres] casos positivos el domingo. Seis de los nuevos casos son personas menores a 18 [dieciocho]. 

NHPR File

Some of the state's largest school districts – including Concord and Manchester - are moving from a largely remote model of instruction to a hybrid later this month.

Many schools in New Hampshire have already been experimenting with the hybrid system for several weeks, with varying degrees of success. 

Josh Rogers / NHPR

State health officials are doubling down on their recommendations to schools for dealing with potential COVID-19 cases, in spite of criticism that the recommendations are too strict.

The state says students with any new or unexplained COVID-19 symptoms should immediately be sent home and referred to their physician for COVID-19 testing.

School Funding: A New Lawsuit and COVID-19

Sep 28, 2020
Three students sit at desks completing worksheets.
The City Journal

Though it has been the subject of debate for decades, school funding is back in the limelight in New Hampshire. The state Supreme Court heard oral arguments last week after four districts sued the state for not funding an adequate education for students. We examine the history and nuances of this discussion and explore how the issue is complicated by COVID-19. 

Air date: Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. 

Find all of our coverage and share your experiences with NHPR's COVID & The Classroom.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

More school districts are announcing positive COVID-19 cases, prompting a handful of schools and over a thousand students to go to remote learning plans this week.

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos visited New Hampshire on Friday to meet with school leaders, teachers and students in Bedford, but her visit was curtailed by a newly confirmed COVID-19 case in the district.

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

En el noticiero de hoy, te compartimos una entrevista con Claudia Castaño, coordinadora para el programa de English Language Learners del distrito de Nashua, sobre cómo ha empezado el año escolar y que recursos de apoyo hay para familias de los estudiantes. 

También te compartimos otras noticias sobre lo que sucede en New Hampshire hoy, viernes 18 de septiembre.

Flickr/Martin Bekkelund

A nationwide shortage of remote learning resources during the pandemic means the states’s largest school districts - Nashua and Manchester – are short thousands of Chromebook laptops.

The Nashua School District already distributed about 7,000 Chromebooks this fall, but some families have started remote learning without computers at home.

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

School districts will be getting less money from the federal government than they expected this fall to cover COVID-related expenses.

Get updates about COVID-19 in N.H. in your inbox - sign up for our newsletter today! 

For months, officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) had told schools that they were eligible for reimbursement for PPE, plastic desk barriers, cleaning supplies, and other materials.

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

Whether remote, hybrid, or in person, back-to-school is a bit more complicated for students with additional needs. We talk with educators and families about how back to school is going for them, as they adapt special education services for the new school normal.

Air date: Wednesday, September 16, 2020. 

DHHS

A coronavirus outbreak among students at Windham High School will force that school to remain remote for at least the next week.

The school was supposed to reopen with a hybrid model on Wednesday, but news that sixteen students had tested positive for COVID-19 prompted the school to change its plans last minute and reopen with a remote model.

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

For months, families across New Hampshire have been wondering what school would look like. And now, a lot of them have a first taste. There have been technological glitches and reports of positive coronavirus cases in several districts.

But as NHPR’s Sarah Gibson reports, many people say they’re relieved the new school year has finally begun.

Todd Bookman

As the school year begins, New Hampshire Public Radio is asking students, teachers and parents to share their stories of what education looks like during coronavirus. 

Click here to tell us your story about the classroom and COVID-19

This is part of our initiative COVID & The Classroom, covering what it's like to return to school in unprecedented times.

This week, we asked people: “How is ‘back to school’ different for you this year?” 

Here’s what we heard:

Flickr/Ivan Radic

The state’s online charter school is getting $7 million in CARES Act funding, in response to a massive spike in enrollment during the pandemic.

The Exeter-based Virtual Learning Academy Charter School (VLACS) offers online classes to students in New Hampshire. Demand for VLACS classes tripled over the summer as families looked for options to remain remote this school year. Despite hiring more than 70 new teachers, VLACS says thousands of potential part-time students are still on the wait list.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

A school year like no other is underway in New Hampshire.

By mid-week, most districts had reopened with a fully in-person, hybrid, or remote model, and families, teachers, and students were getting a first glimpse of what education during the pandemic could be like for months to come.

Tonia Orlando

Some schools are wrapping up their first week of classes on Friday - whether that's remote, hybrid or fully in person. NHPR’s Sarah Gibson caught up with one school leader about what it's been like so far.

Jessica Arnold/Arnold Imaging LLC

New Hampshire schools can continue offering meals to all young people under 18 free of charge for the rest of the calendar year.

Schools have had more flexiblity to provide meals and receive reimbursement from the federal government since the USDA issued waivers during remote learning last spring.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

The coronavirus pandemic is creating major problems in public schools in New Hampshire. But the picture for private schools is different.

Most independent schools are reopening in person, and as NHPR’s Sarah Gibson reports, interest in some of them is higher than ever. 

Courtesy of Julia Playda

Many high school seniors face a difficult choice right now. Go back to school and risk bringing coronavirus into your home, or take online classes and potentially miss out on major parts of senior year.  

NHPR’s Ava Sasani caught up with three students to find out how they’re approaching school this fall.

Needpix

The Manchester School District is re-examining its plans to offer a hybrid model to kindergarten and first-grade students, citing a shortage of teachers willing and able to return to in-person teaching.

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

The New Hampshire Alliance for Public Charter Schools says its members need more money to handle costs associated with the coronavirus pandemic.

Like traditional public schools, charter schools received federal CARES Act relief money, but some say it wasn't enough to cover the cost of new air filtration units, PPE, and laptops for students.

Photo Credit woodleywonderworks via Flickr Creative Commons

The state’s child care licensing unit has received four applications this summer to reopen non- day care spaces as sites for child care and remote learning. 

Officials tell NHPR they did not receive applications like this last year. This comes as many businesses in the state are struggling to remain open due to the economic stress of the pandemic. 

One of the businesses applying for this license is Cowabunga - an indoor playground in Manchester that hosts parties for kids. 

Education Reporters On Back-to-School Challenges

Aug 21, 2020
Flickr

Education reporters describe a back-to-school season like no other. As districts around the country wrestle with what education will look like this fall, reporters are digging into reopening plans and talking with teachers, families, and administrators. We check in with journalists covering this topic, both at the state and national level. 

Air date: Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. 

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

With school just weeks away, some districts are still at odds with teachers' unions over whether to reopen buildings.

Unions across the state are still in the process of  bargaining with districts over how reopening plans affect current contract provisions.

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Sara Plourde for NHPR

In the third of our four-part series, "The Exchange: Live From Home," we talk with two New Hampshire authors on parenting and education, and an infectious disease specialist, about the triumphs and challenges of back-to-school season as a family. Listen to the audio below, and watch a video of the event. 

Air date: Thursday, August 20, 2020. 

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