Coronavirus Coverage | New Hampshire Public Radio

Coronavirus Coverage

Credit Centers for Disease Control

Important links:

For more info on COVID-19 in N.H., visit the N.H. Dep. of Health & Human Services page here

Genevieve Andress for NHPR

Across New Hampshire, parents, teachers and students are getting a first glimpse of what school might look like this fall.

For many, the picture is not as they had hoped. 

Ostin Bernier

As parts of New Hampshire’s economy begin returning to something like business as usual, one key piece of the puzzle has been child care: will parents be able to find someone to watch their kids when they go back to work?

The state says there are plenty of open child care spots available across New Hampshire -- in all parts of the state, and for all age groups. But the picture is a little different when you look up close. Parents say they can’t go back to work because they can’t find reliable care, and child care providers say they’re turning families away every day.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

In our second virtual event for The Exchange: Live From Home, we talked with economists about how our personal financial stability has changed in the short term -- and what that means for the long term health of our economy.

This is the second of four virtual events as part of "The Exchange Live From Home." It happened live on Tuesday, Aug. 4 at 7 p.m.

Find more events here.

Air date: Thursday, August 6, 2020. 

Stethoscope
jasleen_kaur

With most New Hampshire schools just a month from reopening, there's one staff member on many people's minds: the school nurse.

As schools across the country grapple with bringing kids back into the classroom, parents — and teachers — are worried about safety. We asked pediatricians, infectious disease specialists and education experts for help evaluating school district plans.

What we learned: There's no such thing as zero risk, but certain practices can lower the risk of an outbreak at school and keep kids, teachers and families safer.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

The Board of Trustees of the University System of New Hampshire approved reopening plans for UNH, Keene State and Plymouth State on Tuesday. 

Those plans include on-campus and in-person instruction for students. The university system is also offering online options for students who do not want to return to campus. 

File Photo, NHPR

The Nashua School District, like many across the state, plans to reopen its schools this fall under a hybrid learning model, with students in school a few days a week and then learning remotely for the rest of the week.

The district announced a reopening plan Monday to begin the semester fully remote, but transition to that hybrid plan starting in October.

But how do teachers feel about that plan? NHPR's Peter Biello spoke with Adam Marcoux, the president of the Nashua Teachers' Union, to find out.

Update, Wednesday, 7 p.m.: Superintendent Jahmal Mosley and Marcoux, in a joint statement Aug. 5, said there continue to be many details that need to be worked out. They said once the reopening plan is approved, they can work together to address safety concerns, contractual issues, and other issues raised.

Britta Greene for NHPR

This story has been updated with additional information.

More than 330,000 surgical masks, 8,200 jugs of sanitizing wipes, 5,300 face shields and 3,200 sneeze guards are on their way to local pollworkers across New Hampshire in the coming weeks, according to a new memo from the Secretary of State's office. 

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

Several New Hampshire towns will vote this week on whether to require residents to wear face masks in public. The votes come as New Hampshire remains the only state in the region without a statewide mask mandate.

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This story is part of an NPR nationwide analysis of states' revenue and budgets during the pandemic.

Sean Hurley

The coronavirus pandemic has drawn increasing crowds to the great outdoors, including many popular hiking trails, swimming holes and recreation areas in the White Mountains. But the burst in popularity has created new problems for the folks who manage New Hampshire's national forest.

NHPR

An emergency stipend program meant to address the staffing crisis at New Hampshire's long-term care facilities amid the coronavirus pandemic lapsed at the end of last week.

But advocates say the need for the stipends is still acute, as facilities across the state struggle to hire and retain the workers they need to adequately care for their residents.

CREDIT MIKE ROSS, UNH

Friday is the new deadline by which students in the University System of New Hampshire have been asked to sign an informed consent agreement before arriving on campus.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

This post gathers NHPR's past updates on coronavirus in New Hampshire with a date range beginning June 16, 2020.

NOTE: Some of the stories below may contained outdated guidance and stories that have since evolved. Please click the links below for the most up-to-date coverage and guidance. 

nashuanh.gov

The city of Nashua is taking on the issue of childhood immunizations, after the CDC reported a nationwide drop in vaccinations as a result of families staying home due to COVID-19.

This evening, Nashua is hosting the first of three free mobile vaccination clinics for children in the Greater Nashua area.

The federal government has reached a deal worth up to $2.1 billion with drugmakers Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline as part of Operation Warp Speed, the Trump administration's push to have a coronavirus vaccine widely available by early 2021.

The money will go toward clinical trials, scaling up manufacturing and purchasing 100 million doses of the vaccine.

Courtesy of Kelly Bresnahan

School districts are facing a lot of unknowns. One of the biggest questions is whether teachers with health concerns have to return to school or if they can work remotely. NHPR’s Sarah Gibson caught up with three teachers in the midst of figuring out how their districts will accommodate them, and whether that will be enough.


Earlier this month, when the Trump administration told hospitals to send crucial data about coronavirus cases and intensive care capacity to a new online system, it promised the change would be worth it. The data would be more complete and transparent and an improvement over the old platform run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, administration officials said.

Instead, the public data hub created under the new system is updated erratically and is rife with inconsistencies and errors, data analysts say.

Wikimedia Commons

Gov. Chris Sununu says the state is ready for the 12,000 fans expected to gather for this weekend's NASCAR race in Loudon.

At a press conference this afternoon in Concord, Sununu said 90 percent of the people attending Sunday's race will be coming from New England.

He announced modified quarantine requirements and restrictions for NASCAR staff and drivers when they're in the state. They'll need to limit their travel to between the racetrack and their hotels.

This story has been updated with additional information.

New Hampshire's state epidemiologist is urging both pollworkers and voters to wear masks at all times inside the state's polling places if they show up for in-person balloting for this fall's elections.

File Photo, NHPR

Originalmente escrito en inglés por Ethan Dewitt para The Concord Monitor y publicado el 15 de julio del 2020. 

Traducido al español por María Aguirre

The head of a powerful national teachers union told members Tuesday that its leadership would support "safety strikes" if health precautions are not met amid calls for schools to reopen as coronavirus cases surge.

Randi Weingarten, who leads the American Federation of Teachers, is leaving the final decision to local unions on whether to strike. The AFT — the nation's second-largest teachers union, with 1.7 million members — also unveiled several benchmarks that it said should be met before schools can fully welcome back students and staff.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

The state of New Hampshire is analyzing the ventilation systems at its long-term care facilities that have seen coronavirus outbreaks.

State health and fire officials will conduct the two-week review, which was announced at a press conference Tuesday.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

As more businesses and the rest of New England begin to require the wearing of face masks, New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu says he still thinks a statewide mandate is not needed.

At a press conference Tuesday, Sununu and health officials urged people to wear masks when they are out in public. But Sununu said he thinks this would be hard to enforce as a requirement.

“At the end of the day, it's still up to each of us to take that personal responsibility seriously and wear it as often as we can, as much as we can,” Sununu said.

As coronavirus cases continue to surge across the country, Marketplace is probing the current state of the U.S. economy and looking ahead to what a future economy may look like. A three-part special this summer asks the question: “The Economy, What Now?” During the hour-long specials, Marketplace’s hosts and correspondents will look at some of the explosive variables impacting our economy right now, including the ongoing pandemic, historic unemployment, and the conversation around social injustice.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The New Hampshire Motor Speedway expects 12,000 fans to show up for this Sunday’s Foxwoods Resort Casino 301 NASCAR race, the largest in-person sporting event in the region since the pandemic began.

Gov. Chris Sununu approved a plan that allows the track to have up to 35% of capacity, or around 19,000 people in attendance. The track created its own web page to alert fans to its updated safety protocols.

Oscar Villacis

A continuación, pueden leer las noticias del martes 28 de julio. 

También las puedes escuchar haciendo click en el siguiente audio. 

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes. 

Nuevos casos de COVID-19

New Hampshire reportó siete nuevos casos de COVID-19 el lunes…el número más bajo de casos en un solo dia que se ha reportado en más de un mes. 

File photo

Congress is in negotiations to extend federal unemployment benefits under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

Sean Hurley

The Plymouth Selectboard will host a town-wide zoom hearing Monday evening on a proposed ordinance mandating face coverings in town. Over the weekend, on the town common, an anti-mask mandate protest was held. NHPR’s Sean Hurley was there. 

Update: Plymouth's Select Board voted for the mask mandate on August 10. Click here for that story.

Photo Credit woodleywonderworks via Flickr Creative Commons

The uncertainty over school reopening plans has more parents in New Hampshire exploring the option of homeschooling for the first time.

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