Coronavirus Coverage | New Hampshire Public Radio

Coronavirus Coverage

Credit Centers for Disease Control

Important links:

For more info on COVID-19 in N.H., visit the N.H. Dep. of Health & Human Services page here

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del lunes 31 de agosto. 

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Se reportaron nueve casos adicionales de COVID-19

Los funcionarios de salud anunciaron 9 casos adicionales de COVID-19 en New Hampshire...Hasta la fecha, son 7, 254 [siete mil doscientos cincuenta cuatro] los casos confirmados de COVID-19 en el estado. 

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

The coronavirus pandemic is creating major problems in public schools in New Hampshire. But the picture for private schools is different.

Most independent schools are reopening in person, and as NHPR’s Sarah Gibson reports, interest in some of them is higher than ever. 

Despite a foothold in medicine that predates Hippocrates himself, the traditional physical exam might be on the verge of extinction. The coronavirus crisis has driven more routine medical appointments online, accelerating a trend toward telemedicine that has already been underway.

Courtesy of Julia Playda

Many high school seniors face a difficult choice right now. Go back to school and risk bringing coronavirus into your home, or take online classes and potentially miss out on major parts of senior year.  

NHPR’s Ava Sasani caught up with three students to find out how they’re approaching school this fall.

Photo Credit woodleywonderworks via Flickr Creative Commons

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del viernes 28 de agosto. 

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

New Hampshire recibira máquinas de pruebas rápidas de COVID-19

New Hampshire ordenó 25 nuevas máquinas de pruebas rápidas de COVID-19. El gobernador Chris Sununu dijo que las nuevas máquinas van a empezar a usarse entre octubre y noviembre. 

Josh Rogers/NHPR

In a normal election year, a long-time New Hampshire Democratic activist like Bette Lasky might have been in the room when Joe Biden delivered his convention speech. But last week, Lasky was in a parking lot in Derry, watching Biden’s speech drive-in movie style, the candidate projected on a giant screen. As she stood by her car, Lasky looked into the darkening summer sky and noted how, for her, 2020 politics feel deeply unnatural.    

Looking for a snapshot of coronavirus outbreaks in U.S. schools? The National Education Association has just launched a tracker of cases in public K-12 schools.

The tracker is broken down by state and shows schools and counties with known cases and suspected cases and deaths, as well as whether those infected were students or staff. It also includes links to the local news reports so users know where the virus data comes from.

Courtesy

Mark LaVoie lives in Newton, N.H., in an old farmhouse that he’s slowly restoring. Pre-pandemic, he commuted into Boston three or four days a week for a job at a public relations firm.

He was diligent about keeping track of the days he worked from home because Massachusetts allows commuters like him to deduct those days from their income tax obligations.

Or, at least it used to. 

Needpix

The Manchester School District is re-examining its plans to offer a hybrid model to kindergarten and first-grade students, citing a shortage of teachers willing and able to return to in-person teaching.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

New Hampshire has worked to adapt to living with the coronavirus. The state came to a halt in the spring and has retooled itself throughout the summer. 

At NHPR, we're contining to report on the pandemic and all the ways it intersects with our lives.

We always welcome your questions about COVID-19

And we always want to hear from our audience and new communities to better our reporting. It is central to our work - it shapes what we report on and how we cover topics. 

Please take a few minutes to tell us what you're facing at home, work and school. Most importantly, just let us know how you are doing. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Somewhere between the economic intimacy of Main Street shopping, and the "Deals! Deals! Deals!" consumerism of the outlets, there lies the humble strip mall.

Updated Thursday at 4:55 p.m. ET

The Trump administration has stirred confusion and concern by rewriting its guidelines for coronavirus testing. Public health experts fear the revised guidelines will lead to less testing – something the president has repeatedly asked for — but the administration denies that.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

As students from across the country return to college in New Hampshire, New Hampshire Public Radio wants to hear how the return to campus is going.

Take a few minutes to tell us how it’s been. If you’re a student, do you feel comfortable back on campus? Is your college cracking down on gatherings?

Or are you a professor or staff member at a college? Are you worried about your safety, or even your job security?

If you can't see the embedded survey below, click here for a better experience.

Cori Princell / NHPR

It’s been about six months since the COVID-19 pandemic abruptly changed our lives. 

From the beginning, we’ve been asking you to share your experiences with us, to help in our understanding and reporting. 

As families prepare for a new school year and more of us get back to work, it may seem like things are returning to normal. But we’re still hearing plenty of uncertainty from you.

Click here to tell us about what your experience has been like through the pandemic

Here is some of what we’ve been hearing in our survey since Aug. 1:

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

The New Hampshire Alliance for Public Charter Schools says its members need more money to handle costs associated with the coronavirus pandemic.

Like traditional public schools, charter schools received federal CARES Act relief money, but some say it wasn't enough to cover the cost of new air filtration units, PPE, and laptops for students.

File photo

Some recovery groups in New Hampshire say there are more people struggling with addiction now than before the pandemic. In a Zoom conference call on Tuesday hosted by U.S Rep. Annie Kuster, mental health counselors said isolation is making it difficult for people to seek help. 

Shanna Large is director of Substance Use Disorders at Riverbend Community Mental Health. She says she’s noticing an increase in alcohol abuse. 

A person with a high viral load walks into a bar.

That, according to researchers who study the novel coronavirus, is a recipe for a superspreading event — where one person or gathering leads to an unusually high number of new infections. And that kind of occurrence is increasingly considered a hallmark of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Flikr Creative Commons / Grumpy-Puddin

Some New Hampshire recovery centers say they are dealing with a lapse in funds as the state waits to receive more federal money.  

An official from the Department of Health and Human Services says the state applied for a national State Opioid Response grant in May. Now, they’re waiting for at least $28.1 million from the US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration. 

This funding provides support to 16 recovery centers in the state. 

The Food and Drug Administration has given the green light to expand the use of blood plasma in treating hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

The emergency use authorization announced Sunday involves convalescent plasma — taking antibodies from the blood of people who have recovered from COVID-19. That plasma is then given to patients currently sick in hopes that the antibodies will help fight off the disease.

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases linked to a wedding reception earlier this month in Maine continues to rise.

At least 53 people have been infected with the virus, officials with the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported over the weekend, according to the Portland Press Herald.

The paper notes that state health investigators have traced both "secondary and tertiary transmission of the virus."

The number of confirmed coronavirus deaths in the U.S. continues to climb.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as of Sunday there have been 175,651 lives lost to the virus and 5.64 million total cases. The death count rose by just over a thousand from the day before, the CDC reported.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

President Donald Trump announced plans to host a campaign rally in Manchester on Friday, August 28, a day after party leaders wrap up the largely virtual Republican National Convention in North Carolina.

Via Plymouth State web site

Plymouth State University students are required to get tested for COVID-19 and provide a negative test result before returning to campus. But the university says there are delays in getting those results.

The delay has affected several hundred students' planned move-in to campus. Instead of a staggered return with each student assigned a specific day and time, PSU is now allowing students to move in whenever they get that negative test result through Sunday.

Education Reporters On Back-to-School Challenges

Aug 21, 2020
Flickr

Education reporters describe a back-to-school season like no other. As districts around the country wrestle with what education will look like this fall, reporters are digging into reopening plans and talking with teachers, families, and administrators. We check in with journalists covering this topic, both at the state and national level. 

Air date: Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Students are already returning to New Hampshire’s university and college campuses for the start of the fall semester -- amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Below are some frequently asked questions about higher education reopening in the state. We’ll be updating this post as reopening begins in earnest over the next few days. 

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

With school just weeks away, some districts are still at odds with teachers' unions over whether to reopen buildings.

Unions across the state are still in the process of  bargaining with districts over how reopening plans affect current contract provisions.

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Across America, buildings are opening back up — offices, schools, theaters, stores, restaurants — even as evidence mounts that the coronavirus can circulate through the air in a closed indoor space.

That means a lot of business owners and facility managers are calling up people like Dennis Knight, the founder of Whole Buildings Systems in Charleston, S.C., asking what they can do to make sure their building doesn't spread the virus.

State officials and federal agencies warn there's a new phone scam circulating: Callers posing as COVID-19 contact tracers are trying to pry credit card or bank account information from unsuspecting victims.

The grifters apparently are taking advantage of a genuine public health intervention that is crucial to stopping the spread of the novel coronavirus: contact tracing.

TONY WEBSTER, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Hundreds of businesses have shuttered across the state due to the coronavirus pandemic, reveals a new report from the review site Yelp.

A spokesperson for Yelp told NHPR that 449 businesses closed (both temporarily and permanently) between March and July. Last month, 280 businesses were marked as permanently closed in the state.

The U.S. stock market has come a long way in a short time.

The S&P 500 index closed at a record high Tuesday, nearly six months after coronavirus lockdowns that shut down much of the economy sent the markets plunging.

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