Coronavirus Coverage | New Hampshire Public Radio

Coronavirus Coverage

Credit Centers for Disease Control

Important links:

For more info on COVID-19 in N.H., visit the N.H. Dep. of Health & Human Services page here

Earlier in this pandemic, the shortage of tests for the coronavirus was a major problem in fighting the spread of COVID-19. The shortage was such that many hospitals and clinics would test only someone who had traveled to a country with an outbreak, had a known exposure to a positive case or showed symptoms of the disease.

But access to tests has improved significantly, and in some places, people can now get tested without having to show any symptoms at all. So if you can get tested, should you?

In April, New Orleans health officials realized their drive-through testing strategy for the coronavirus wasn't working. The reason? Census tract data revealed hot spots for the virus were located in predominantly low-income African-American neighborhoods where many residents lacked cars.

Updated at 8:13 p.m. ET

The U.S. Department of Justice is siding with campground and restaurant owners in Maine who sued the state over a two-week self-quarantine policy for out-of-state visitors.

Democratic Gov. Janet Mills imposed the restriction as part the state's response to the ongoing pandemic. Several other states have imposed similar measures.

Kristy Cardin

The New Hampshire Department of Education is wrapping up a survey it says will help the state plan for re-opening and redesigning schools next fall.

The survey, which has been completed by over 50,000 parents, teachers, and administrators, asks participants to rate how remote learning has gone, and whether families and educators want to head back to school. The goal is to get input to share with a state task force on school reopening and redesign (STRRT).

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Two Manchester hospitals at the center of New Hampshire’s COVID-19 response have identified new outbreaks among patients and staff not directly connected to their coronavirus treatment units.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

Hoy, viernes 29 de mayo, te contamos:

Hoy es el último día para que negocios pequeños y medianos presenten la pre-aplicación al Main Street Relief Fund. 

El gobernador Sununu formó un equipo de defensa a la equidad como respuesta a los efectos desproporcionados de COVID-19 en las comunidades Latinas y Afroamericanas en NH.

Riverside Speedway y Adventure Park no recibirán multa por violar restricciones. Abrirán este fin de semana pero no para carreras. 

Haz click en el audio para escuchar las noticias completas.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

An order issued by Gov. Chris Sununu regarding services during the pandemic for students with disabilities is drawing praise from special education advocates and concern from school districts.

The emergency order issued Tuesday clarifies the timeline and requirements for districts to meet the needs of students who get special ed services through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

CDC

Governor Chris Sununu has established a new task force that will recommend a plan to address the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on communities of color in New Hampshire.

According to the most recent data from the state, black and Latino residents are testing positive at higher rates than their share of the population. That follows national trends on who’s been most affected by the virus.

Sara Marzinik

On March 15, Gov. Chris Sununu announced K-12 school closures across New Hampshire and a transition to remote learning. Just over a month later, he extended his order through the end of the school year.

The decision, while necessary, changed the way the education system operates. 

BAA.org

The Boston Marathon is officially canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

This is the first cancellation in the history of the 124-year race.

Organizers had postponed the marathon from April 20 to Sept. 14.

They say instead they will offer a "virtual event" in which participants who verify that they ran 26.2 miles on their own will receive their finisher's medal.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Hoy, jueves 28 de mayo, te contamos:

Farmaceúticos ya pueden administrar pruebas de COVID-19 bajo una orden del gobernador, con certificación y licencias apropiadas.

En Manchester, se considera el uso de centros para refrescarse para una posible ola de calor. Ciudades como Nashua esperarán una advertencia nacional antes de diseñar esos centros. 

Una senadora advierte a los ciudadanos sobre los fraudes y estafas que se dan a cabo durante la emergencia. 

Haz click en el audio para escuchar las noticias completas. 

Sporting events, church services, concerts and community festivals illuminated our lives before the coronavirus pandemic disrupted daily routines and traditional gatherings. Now, in a different and challenging time – how do we find community? What can be done when we can’t gather in person?

Join us Saturday at 4 p.m. for a national call-in talk show, “America Amplified: Life, Community and COVID-19.”

NHPR

New Hampshire Circuit Courts are now accepting electronically filed petitions for protection from domestic violence and stalking.

Before the COVID-19 crisis, the courts required an in-person filing at a local courthouse.

Domestic Violence Program Manager Sarah Freeman says with courts limiting the number of people inside, domestic violence and stalking filings have dropped by about 20 percent.

Updated at 9:38 a.m. ET

More than 1 in 4 U.S. workers have lost their jobs since the coronavirus crisis shut down much of the economy in March.

Just last week, another 2.1 million people filed for unemployment benefits, the Labor Department said Thursday. That's down 323,000 from the previous week but brings the total for the past 10 weeks to 40.8 million, which represents 26% of the civilian labor force in April.

The coronavirus continues to batter the U.S. health care workforce.

More than 60,000 health care workers have been infected, and close to 300 have died from COVID-19, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 has reached a somber milestone: As of Wednesday afternoon, the highly infectious viral disease has taken more than 100,000 lives nationwide.

Courtesy Brandon Paine

A dry cough, shortness of breath, a fever: These are the most well-known symptoms of COVID-19.

But for some people who test positive, that’s just the beginning of what can be a life-changing ordeal.

NHPR’s Jason Moon reports on two families whose battle with the virus will stay with them long after the initial symptoms are gone.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

A new survey from UNH and Dartmouth College shows that about three quarters of New Hampshire residents would like to have a COVID-19 antibody test.

Sign up for our email newsletter for more news and information about coronavirus in N.H.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The state’s top tax official says the coronavirus pandemic could cut state coffers by more than $450 million through the middle of next year.

Sign up for our email newsletter for more news and information about coronavirus in N.H.

State revenue commissioner Lindsey Stepp told lawmakers her department’s latest revenue estimates don’t presume a second wave of the coronavirus. She also stressed the challenges of modeling tax collections under the circumstances.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Hoy, miércoles 27 de mayo,  te contamos:

Aparecen más brotes del virus en centros de la tercera edad. Ya son 17 en total en el estado.

Existen negocios en NH que violan las órdenes de restricciones impuestas por el gobernador en la emergencia. 

Campamentos se preparan para sesiones virtuales y posibles reuniones en persona mientras esperan instrucciones finales de la gobernación. 

Haz click en el audio para escuchar las noticias completas.

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For veterinarian Sabrina Estabrook-Russett, the COVID-19 pandemic is further proof that the medical world could use a paradigm shift –  closer collaboration between veterinarians and doctors who treat humans.

Dr. Estabrook-Russett, who has worked on foreign veterinary projects involving white rhinos in South Africa and street dogs in Sri Lanka, is owner of Court Street Veterinary Hospital in Keene. She and veterinarian Michael Dutton joined The Exchange to discuss how the coronavirus has affected veterinary practices. Dr. Dutton is founder of Weare Animal Hospital and Exotic Bird Clinic and the Hopkinton Animal Hospital.

 

(For the full conversation, listen here. Excerpts here have been edited slightly for clarity).

 

“I think we've got a lot to offer in terms of research that is already underway, that's already being worked on, that could then be applied to human medicine," Estabrook-Russett said. 

 

 

 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Democrats hold majorities in both the New Hampshire House and Senate, but Republicans could make it impossible for state lawmakers to pass any legislation this year, as State House leaders attempt to finish business amid COVID-19 closures.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

While most of the state's businesses appear to be adhering to emergency orders issued by Gov. Chris Sununu designed to limit the spread of the coronavirus, more entities are openly violating the guidelines as the pandemic drags into warmer weather.

Related: What's open and what's not open in New Hampshire?

Sara Plourde | NHPR

It's graduation time, and for the Class of 2020, it's an experience like no class has had before. 

What are your words of wisdom for these young people? Are you graduating and want to share your story? We want to talk to you.

This program aired on Tuesday, May 26 at 7 p.m.

This show is free, but making it isn't. Support NHPR's newsroom by becoming a member today!

Veterinarians Adjust Practices During Pandemic

May 26, 2020
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From restricting access to certain areas, offering drive-through services, and delaying non-emergency procedures, veterinarians have been taking some of the same precautions as doctors who treat humans, since COVID-19 arrived.  They have even adopted telemedicine in some cases. 

When President Trump took office in 2017, his team stopped work on new federal regulations that would have forced the health care industry to prepare for an airborne infectious disease pandemic such as COVID-19. That decision is documented in federal records reviewed by NPR.

DodgertonSkillhause / Morguefile

The coronavirus pandemic has prompted concerns about health—and not just physical health. Financial health is also a major concern for many NHPR listeners.

Subscribe to our COVID-19 newsletter for the latest updates from NHPR.

UNH Carsey School

A recent poll says New Hampshire residents' trust in science and government advice hasn't changed much, even as the coronavirus spreads.

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire's Survey Center polled about 1,800 residents in March and April.

Subscribe to our COVID-19 newsletter for the latest updates from NHPR.

People visiting Six Flags theme parks and water parks this summer will be required to wear face masks at all times, the company said, as it prepares to reopen its first park to visitors since the coronavirus forced mass closures. Six Flags said it also will use thermal imaging to screen temperatures of guests and employees before they can enter.

Stock traders wore masks at the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday as the trading floor reopened for the first time since March. The exchange has been restricted to electronic trading for two months out of concern over the spread of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

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