Coronavirus Coverage | New Hampshire Public Radio

Coronavirus Coverage

Credit Centers for Disease Control

Important links:

For more info on COVID-19 in N.H., visit the N.H. Dep. of Health & Human Services page here

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The state's long-term care ombudsman Susan Buxton is preparing to re-enter long-term care facilities as state and federal authorities continue the proccess of slowly re-opening nursing homes and assisted living facilities, allowing more visitors in hopes of alleviating social isolation.

"We are now in the process of putting together our plan to be able to go back into the facilities," Buxton said.

For information on how to reach the ombudsman, visit here.

Empty classroom
Pickpik

Superintendents across New Hampshire are warning of budget shortfalls and staff shortages as they navigate the coronavirus pandemic.

White House adviser Stephen Miller has tested positive for the coronavirus, the White House press office told NPR, days after President Trump and several others at the White House have also tested positive for the virus.

In a statement shared by the press office, Miller, who made his name as the architect of some of Trump's most controversial and severe immigration policies, said:

"Over the last 5 days I have been working remotely and self-isolating, testing negative every day through yesterday. Today, I tested positive for COVID-19 and am in quarantine."

The University System of New Hampshire includes Granite State College, Keene State College, Plymouth State University, University of New Hampshire, and UNH Franklin Pierce School of Law.
UNH

The pandemic has had a negative financial impact on many New Hampshire institutions, including higher education.

The University System of New Hampshire did receive and benefit from some CARES Act funding, but the costs associated with COVID-19 have meant major revenue losses.

President Trump was discharged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and returned to the White House on Monday evening. He gave reporters a double thumbs-up on his way through the doors, and the White House physician earlier on Monday said, "He's up and back to his old self."

But he's a few days into his diagnosis with COVID-19, a novel disease that doctors are still learning how best to treat. And, medical experts say, he may still be in a danger zone.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now says the coronavirus can be spread through airborne particles that can linger in the air "for minutes or even hours" — even among people who are more than 6 feet apart.

Perhaps it's no surprise, but people are drinking more during the pandemic.

In some cases, by a lot.

American adults say they're drinking 14% more often during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a report in the journal JAMA Network Open. The increase in frequency of drinking for women was more pronounced, up 17% compared to last year.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

With hundreds of thousands of rapid COVID-19 antigen testing supplies slated to arrive in the coming months, the state says it will now include those results in its daily coronavirus testing figures.

President Trump's medical team held a briefing with reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center again on Sunday.

The doctors said that since testing positive for the coronavirus, Trump has had two episodes of a drop in oxygen — one Friday morning before he went to the hospital and again on Saturday — and began a steroid treatment for that specifically.

Updated a 2:40 a.m. ET

President Trump sought to project an image of vigor in the face of COVID-19, with a surprise motorcade Sunday outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he is being treated, as his physicians suggested he could be discharged to return to the White House as early as Monday.

The president was admitted to Walter Reed on Friday, hours after announcing that he and the first lady had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Updated at 9:59 p.m. ET

President Trump tweeted a video update from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Saturday night.

"I came here, wasn't feeling so well. I feel much better now," he said. "We're working hard to get me all the way back. I have to be back because we still have to make America great again. We've done an awfully good job of that, but we still have steps to go and we have to finish that job. And I'll be back — I think I'll be back soon."

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del viernes 2 de octubre. 

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Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.


How New Hampshire's Housing Market Is Changing

Oct 2, 2020
A residential street with brick row houses.
Wikimedia Commons

The housing market in New Hampshire has been dramatically impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. In some communities, people are moving in from Boston or New York City to escape the pandemic and pricing out local residents. Meanwhile, across the state, affordable rental housing continues to be in short supply. We get the latest on home ownership, rentals, and evictions. 

Air date: Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. 

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

The country was put on edge overnight as President Trump announced that he and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the coronavirus, a stunning announcement that raises concerns about their health and throws the final stretch of the presidential campaign — already upended by the pandemic — even further into unknown territory.

The couple's 14-year-old son, Barron Trump, has tested negative for the virus, the first lady's chief of staff, Stephanie Grisham, told NPR.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

State health officials are doubling down on their recommendations to schools for dealing with potential COVID-19 cases, in spite of criticism that the recommendations are too strict.

The state says students with any new or unexplained COVID-19 symptoms should immediately be sent home and referred to their physician for COVID-19 testing.

Via southchurch.uu.org

Portsmouth's South Church will host a wedding ceremony despite concerns that attendees have ties to an ongoing outbreak of COVID-19 in Maine.

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COVID-19 has caused widespread damage to the economy — so wide that it can be easy to overlook how unevenly households are suffering. But new polling data out this month reveal households that either have had someone with COVID-19 or include someone who has a disability or special needs are much more likely to also be hurting financially.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del viernes 25 de septiembre.  

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Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Rastreadores de contacto del estado identifican a más de 22,000 personas potencialmente expuestas a casos de COVID-19

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Some long-term care facilities are slowly reopening to allow visits from family members, recognizing that residents have been suffering both emotionally and physically after months of isolation.  The facilities have been doing so according to guidelines released recently by the state, as well as by federal authorities. 

Still, it can be a precarious balancing act: Allowing more people in – especially when adequate testing is lacking – can mean introducing the virus.  

In another effort aimed at getting travelers back on planes, United Airlines will begin offering on-the-spot coronavirus testing to some passengers at the airport before they board their flight.

Since the pandemic began, working mothers have grappled with staying engaged at their jobs. That predictable outcome has big consequences for families, employers and the American economy.

Due to the recession caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, women are leaving their jobs or scaling back work responsibilities at alarming rates. And in part, it’s because of the still-ingrained expectation that women are responsible for child care.

From Chabeli Carrrazana, writing for The 19th:

Susan Simoneta via Flickr CC

New Hampshire's high death rate from COVID-19 in elder-care facilities has exposed gaps in protective gear, testing, and staffing. Improvements have come in some areas but challenges remain. Meanwhile, both the state and federal government recently issued new visitation guidelines to help ease the severe mental and physical health effects of isolation. We examine how these facilities are preparing for this change.

Air date: Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020.

From shiny red pencils reading "My Attendance Rocks!" to countless plaques and ribbons and trophies and certificates and gold stars: For as long as anyone can remember, taking attendance — and rewarding kids for simply showing up — is a time-honored school ritual.

For good reason: Just being there, day in, day out, happens to be one of the most important factors that determines a child's success in school. And average daily head count forms the basis of school funding decisions at the federal, state and local level.

When the coronavirus pandemic hit, Jesus Gonzalez was about a year into starting a Cuban food catering and "pop-up" business in Lexington, Ky. It's like "a food truck, but without a truck," he says.

His steadiest gig was setting up tables with a spread of Cuban food at local breweries so people could eat while quaffing pints. But then all that shut down. And he says things aren't back to normal enough yet for the breweries to bring him back.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

More school districts are announcing positive COVID-19 cases, prompting a handful of schools and over a thousand students to go to remote learning plans this week.

Courtesy Rachel Starr Davis

In the wake of a Portsmouth mother getting kicked off of an American Airlines flight after her toddler refused to wear a mask, some public health experts are questioning whether very young children need them.

Dr. Keith Loud, the physician-in-chief at Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, says young children are still a lower risk for COVID-19 transmission.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force are briefing a Senate panel on the federal response to the pandemic.

Witnesses include Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health and CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield.

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Annie Ropeik for NHPR

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del martes 22 de septiembre.  

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Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.


Updated at 6:03 p.m. ET

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted guidance Friday evening saying that aerosol transmission might be one of the "most common" ways the coronavirus is spreading — and then took the guidance down on Monday.

The now-deleted updates were notable because so far the CDC has stopped short of saying that the virus is airborne.

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