Coronavirus Coverage

Credit Centers for Disease Control

So far 1,091 cases of COVID-19 have been identified in the state, as of April 14, and 27 patients have died. The CDC and N.H. health officials are conducting containment efforts, including use of isolation to decrease introductions and spread of the virus. The state urges residents to take the following precautions:

  • Avoid any domestic and international travel, especially on public transportation such as buses, trains, and airplanes.
  • Practice social distancing. Stay at least 6 feet from other people, including distancing while in waiting areas or lines.
  • Anybody who is told to self-quarantine and stay at home due to exposure to a person with confirmed or suspect COVID-19 needs to stay home, and not go out into public places.
  • If you are 60 years or older or have chronic medical conditions, you need to stay home and not go out.
  • Avoid gatherings of 10 people or more.
  • Employers need to move to telework as much as possible.
  • There is increasing evidence that this virus can survive for hours or possibly even a few days on surfaces, so people should clean frequently touched surfaces, including door handles, grocery cart and grocery basket handles, etc.

For more info on COVID-19 in N.H., visit the N.H. Dep. of Health & Human Services page here

Updated Monday at 2 p.m. ET to reflect new guidance on play dates during school closures. This is an evolving story and guidance from health authorities is evolving quickly.

Never before have workers telecommuted on such a broad scale. Millions of people are trying to work from home — if they can, of course. Life Kit wants to help WFH work for you, especially if you're doing so for the first time.

On a spring morning, Jamie Fields and her mom Joyce Collins are standing outside a grocery store in New Rochelle, N.Y., arguing over how to stay safe.

"She's very nervous," Collins says. She's only 57, but was recently diagnosed with lung cancer, which means she's vulnerable to COVID-19. "I just got out of the hospital."

They live together just up the street in the center of the New Rochelle containment area. They say they're trying to keep their sense of humor about a global pandemic that's landed on their doorstep.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu issued an executive order Sunday, March 15, for the closure of public schools as New Hampshire works to limit spread of the coronavirus.

[Click here for all of our coverage, including our updated FAQs and the latest guidance about coronavirus in New Hampshire.]

Watch the full news conference below, via NHPR's Facebook live:

Josh Rogers | NHPR

The state has identified the seventh person in New Hampshire who tested positive for the virus as an adult female resident of Rockingham County, according to a press release from the state Department of Health and Human Services sent Friday night.

Officials say that person was at the Manchester DMV office from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday of last week, and on Tuesday of this week.

With jittery shoppers flocking to supermarkets to stock up on supplies for the coronavirus outbreak, some of the country's largest grocery chains are announcing measures to enhance sanitation and maintain supplies.

Across the U.S., hand sanitizer, toilet paper, sanitation wipes and canned goods have been flying off shelves as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases continues to climb.

Updated at 10:41 p.m.

President Trump has tested negative for the coronavirus, according to a statement Saturday from the White House.

"Last night after an in-depth discussion with the President regarding COVID-19 testing, he elected to proceed," Sean Conley, the physician to the president, wrote in a memo released by the White House. "This evening I received confirmation that the test is negative."

Sarah Gibson | NHPR

The U.S. Census Bureau is urging residents to fill out the 2020 census online, by mail and over the phone by April 1 as a way to limit person-to-person contact as coronavirus continues to spread.

New Hampshire households are receiving mailers with directions to fill out the census online at my2020census.gov. The mailer includes a Census ID, but residents can still complete the survey without one.

NHPR continues to bring you the latest on the coronavirus pandemic and its impact in New Hampshire and beyond. Join us later this week for a two-part special on COVID-19, from our public media partners at APM (American Public Media).

“COVID-19: Hard Questions, Real Answers” will feature medical and public health professionals, taking live listener calls from across the country. For both broadcasts, listeners are invited to call in using this number: 800-242-2828.

The program will air live on NHPR Wednesday and Thursday at 2 p.m. 

Updated at 8:38 p.m. ET

The U.S. and countries around the world continued to adapt to the spreading coronavirus pandemic by imposing new restrictions Saturday, as the virus upended travel plans, pushed back elections and forced major companies to adapt.

In Washington, the Trump administration said Saturday that the U.S. would extend the current ban on travel from Europe to include the U.K. and Ireland, effective midnight Monday.

How long can the new coronavirus live on a surface, like say, a door handle, after someone infected touches it with dirty fingers? A study out this week finds that the virus can survive on hard surfaces such as plastic and stainless steel for up to 72 hours and on cardboard for up to 24 hours.

Josh Rogers/NHPR

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu declared a state of emergency Friday in the state’s effort to deal with the coronavirus pandemic. As he did, Sununu argued that the current threat to public safety here is minor and the emergency declaration was merely a precautionary step.

Still, earlier in the day, state health officials sought authority to spend up to $15 million to pay for a broad range of expenses to bulk up New Hampshire’s response to the COVID-19 threat.

Alexius Horatius/Creative Commons

Most Fridays, between 300 and 400 people gather to pray at the Islamic Society of New Hampshire's mosque in Manchester. But starting Friday, the doors will be locked -- and there won’t be any more gatherings until further notice.

Courtesy of Lucky's Coffee Garage

Until a few days ago, you could stop by Lucky’s Coffee Garage in Lebanon and get anything you need: a coffee, bite to eat, or even a glass of wine.

But in recent days, Lucky’s has rethought its role as a community gathering spot.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

President Trump on Friday declared that the coronavirus pandemic is a national emergency, a designation that frees up as much as $50 billion in federal assistance to state and local governments overwhelmed by the spread of the virus, and makes it easier to surge medical resources to areas that need them most.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu is reminding town officials that it is their call when it comes to deciding whether to go forward with town meetings as New Hampshire deals with fallout from the coronavirus.

The advice comes as the state is ramping up efforts to address the coronavirus.

In a statement, Sununu said “individual comfort levels" should guide towns' thinking on postponing town meeting.

Updated at 5:39 p.m. ET

President Trump, widely criticized for his administration's response to the coronavirus pandemic, tried to shift blame Friday to his predecessor's handling of a health crisis 11 years ago.

In a series of tweets Friday morning, Trump accused former President Barack Obama of making unspecified changes that "complicated" the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention's testing system.

Louisiana will delay its presidential primary election by more than two months over coronavirus fears, becoming the first state to do so.

The state had more than 35 presumptive positive test results for people with coronavirus as of Friday morning.

The primary had been scheduled for April 4 but will now be on June 20.

File Photo, NHPR

As states across the country announce school closures in response to COVID-19, an increasing number of districts in New Hampshire are following suit, as they assess their ability to offer remote learning in the event of long-term shutdowns.

NHPR Staff

Governor Chris Sununu says he’s directed state agencies to draw up plans on how to reduce spending as COVID-19 affects the economy.

Click here for all of NHPR's coronavirus coverage, including the latest updates, guidance, FAQs, and more. 

Boston Marathon is Officially Postponed Until September

Mar 13, 2020
Jesse Costa / WBUR

From WBUR, by Laney Ruckstuhl, with additional reporting by WBUR's Shira Springer

The 2020 Boston Marathon has officially been postponed to Monday, Sept. 14, in an effort to contain the coronavirus spread, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh announced Friday morning.

"Our expectation ... is that this date will get us to a safer place with relation to the spread of the coronavirus," Walsh said.

Screen capture

Coronavirus update: President Trump declared a national emergency Friday, March 13, to combat the coronavirus pandemic. 

He said it would allow the White House to release the full power of the federal government, and release access to up to $50 billion to support response efforts for states.

cdc.gov

As of Thursday morning (March 12), New Hampshire public health officials had tested 100 people for the coronavirus disease, COVID-19. Tests for 21 other people were pending.

Exactly who gets tested in New Hampshire is driven by CDC guidelines meant to preserve a limited testing supply for those who are most at risk of having been infected.

But the current process is leaving a lot of sick New Hampshire residents frustrated and their medical providers confused.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As concerns over coronavirus upend daily routines around the country, in New Hampshire it’s been mostly business as usual for state and local governments.

 

That’s the case in the State House, where legislative deadlines mean lawmakers have so far kept their normal schedule in a busy time of year. On the local level, towns across the state prepare for town meetings this weekend.

Join New Hampshire Public Radio tonight and this weekend for a one-hour special from NPR on the unfolding coronavirus outbreak.

COVID-19 – What You Need to Know will air the following days and times:

Friday, March 13 – 8 p.m.

Saturday, March 14 – 11 a.m.

Sunday, March 15 - 10 p.m.

The special will feature some of NPR’s most important reporting and practical information on this quick moving public health pandemic.

The Trump administration has announced a series of measures intended to speed testing for the coronavirus disease COVID-19: a new federal coordinator to oversee testing, funding for two companies developing rapid tests and a hotline for labs to call to get help finding needed supplies.

The U.S. government has been sharply criticized for its slow response to the virus, particularly when it comes to testing. Only this week has testing become more widely available in the U.S., and kits remain in limited supply.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 13, 2020

Mar 13, 2020

The growing number of COVID-19 cases has prompted governments to encourage behaviors that will slow or stop the spread of coronavirus, and in some cases, that has meant closing schools. Some large gatherings of people have been canceled, but lawmakers still gathered in Concord this week to debate legislation. 

Updated on March 16 at 1 p.m. ET to reflect new guidance on play dates during school closures. This is an evolving story and guidance from health authorities is evolving quickly.

Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, the wife of Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, has tested positive for the novel coronavirus, becoming the latest in a string of high-profile individuals to become infected with the potentially deadly pathogen.

In a statement on Thursday, the office of the prime minister said Grégoire Trudeau had begun experiencing a low-grade fever and other mild flu-like symptoms the previous day and was subsequently tested.

Updated at 1:00 p.m. EDT

One way employers are hoping to prevent the spread of coronavirus and its toll on their workforce is through telecommuting. Companies from Apple to The Washington Post are giving their employees the option to work from home.

The nation's largest employer is sending a more mixed message.

Updated April 14 at 5:00 p.m. ET

Just as the coronavirus has spread from coast to coast and disrupted nearly every aspect of daily life, so too have the state-level restrictions and recommendations designed to combat it.

Governors are implementing all sorts of measures aimed at controlling the outbreak and responding to the public health and economic damage it has already caused.

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