Coronavirus Coverage

Credit Centers for Disease Control

So far 1,091 cases of COVID-19 have been identified in the state, as of April 14, and 27 patients have died. The CDC and N.H. health officials are conducting containment efforts, including use of isolation to decrease introductions and spread of the virus. The state urges residents to take the following precautions:

  • Avoid any domestic and international travel, especially on public transportation such as buses, trains, and airplanes.
  • Practice social distancing. Stay at least 6 feet from other people, including distancing while in waiting areas or lines.
  • Anybody who is told to self-quarantine and stay at home due to exposure to a person with confirmed or suspect COVID-19 needs to stay home, and not go out into public places.
  • If you are 60 years or older or have chronic medical conditions, you need to stay home and not go out.
  • Avoid gatherings of 10 people or more.
  • Employers need to move to telework as much as possible.
  • There is increasing evidence that this virus can survive for hours or possibly even a few days on surfaces, so people should clean frequently touched surfaces, including door handles, grocery cart and grocery basket handles, etc.

For more info on COVID-19 in N.H., visit the N.H. Dep. of Health & Human Services page here

The Spanish military has found older residents of some care homes "completely abandoned" and even "dead in their beds," Defense Minister Margarita Robles said in a television interview on Monda

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

With reports of busy hiking trails, New Hampshire’s search-and-rescue teams are urging people who head into the forest to use an extra degree of caution to avoid putting wilderness first responders at risk for COVID-19.

While conservation officers are carrying personal protective gear, performing rescues could expose rescuers to the coronavirus.

As COVID-19 begins to hit jails and lockups around the country, the Trump administration is coming under growing pressure to release elderly and other particularly vulnerable inmates in the federal prison system to mitigate the risk of the virus' spread.

Already, three inmates and three staff at federal correctional facilities across the United States have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons. In detention centers at the state and local level, including in New York City's jail system, confirmed cases of COVID-19 are on the rise.

Stay inside, don't meet with friends, don't go to work — these are the messages coming from public health officials at every level of government. But increasingly, experts say they believe those stark warnings must be augmented with another message:

If you think you might be sick, even a little sick, get tested for coronavirus.

The federal government is now adding supercomputers to its tool set in the hunt for ways to stop COVID-19.

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday approved a $100 billion bill to boost testing for the coronavirus and to guarantee paid sick leave for millions of workers impacted by the outbreak. Now, lawmakers are working on a $1 trillion dollar economic stimulus package on top of that. WGBH News' Morning Edition host Joe Mathieu spoke with New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen to learn more about the Senate's response to the pandemic. The transcript below has been edited for clarity.

Public health experts say they are alarmed by President Trump's suggestion that some parts of the country could soon ease some of the dramatic measures being taken to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

"That is exactly the wrong thing to do," Dr. Howard Markel, a noted medical historian at the University of Michigan, wrote NPR in an email. "Cases would go up and so would deaths...we now need to stay the course!"

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is trying to knock down a series of rumors and falsehoods that have been spreading along with the coronavirus pandemic.

It launched a page on its website called Coronavirus Rumor Control to fight the misinformation as officials work to assure the public there is, in fact, no "national quarantine," nor has FEMA deployed "military assets."

"No, FEMA does not have military assets," the site notes.

The election-year coronavirus pandemic has pushed back elections in more than a dozen states, leading to growing interest in expanding voting by mail this year in order to keep poll workers and voters safe.

One of the members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force said she had a "little low-grade fever" over the weekend and stayed home from work that day.

Dr. Deborah Birx, the task force response coordinator, said she went to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center late Saturday night and got tested. The test came back was negative.

"So actually [it was] probably a [gastrointestinal] thing," she said at a task force briefing with President Trump looking on. "But, you know, I'm meticulous. I'm a physician. I looked it up."

The Trump administration announced Monday that the federal government was making it much easier to collect samples to test people for the coronavirus.

A new "self swab" technique would enable people to collect their own samples, making the process much simple, quicker and possibly safer, officials said at a White House briefing.

As remote learning ramps up this week, for students who recieve additional services from their school, including special education, the transition to remote learning is complex. We hear how educators, families, and students are navigating the transition. 

Air date: Tues, March 24, 2020. 

People with disabilities are asking the federal government to stop what they say are policies by states and hospitals that will ration care — and deny them treatment for the coronavirus.

On Monday, several disability groups filed a complaint against the state of Washington, one of the states hardest hit by the pandemic.

Annie Ropeik/NHPR

New Hampshire reported its first death from COVID-19, as the number of confirmed cases of the illness caused by the novel coronavirus rose above 100. The person who died was a Hillsborough County man above the age of 60 who had several underlying medical complications, according to state health officials.

Updated at 8:03 p.m. ET

On Monday evening, President Trump stressed what he called the need to reopen America for business even as he said the government also would continue tackling the spiraling coronavirus pandemic.

The White House's team will make an assessment after next week as to how effective social distancing and other mitigation measures have been in stifling the spread of the virus, said Vice President Pence.

The daily press briefings of the White House coronavirus task force are about to become less crowded.

The White House Correspondents' Association (WHCA) had already thinned out seats in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in order to comply with social distancing guidelines. Now, a suspected COVID-19 case among the White House press corps means there will be even fewer reporters in the room.

WHCA president Jonathan Karl of ABC News announced Monday that an unnamed reporter who attended four briefings earlier this month has a suspected case of the virus.

With the coronavirus outbreak blowing past the 300,000-case mark, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus says world leaders and health officials won't be able to defeat COVID-19 if they rely only on defensive measures such as social distancing and requiring people to stay at home.

The coronavirus has now spread to nearly every country on the planet, the head of the World Health Organization said.

Updated 8:36 p.m. ET

The U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee has endorsed a delay in the start of the 2020 games in Tokyo because of the spread of deadly coronavirus.

The U.S. committee released a statement saying it had polled athletes and concluded that "the enormous disruptions to the training environment, doping controls and qualification process can't be overcome in a satisfactory manner."

As Senate Republicans try to push through a $1.8 trillion coronavirus relief bill this week, they are doing so without a handful of votes in the closely divided chamber: Sens. Rand Paul, Mitt Romney and Mike Lee.

Courtesy of Jordan Travers

It was just a week before the opening night of Pinkerton Academy's production of Children of Eden, and the cast was hard at work in the chorus room, running through the entire musical from start to finish for the first time.

Senior Emma Cahoon was Eve, her first lead role ever in the school’s spring musical, and she remembers the exact moment in the rehearsal when things went wrong.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

In a wide-ranging, digressive news conference Sunday evening, President Trump said he has activated the National Guard to assist New York, California and Washington, states that so far have been hit hardest by the coronavirus.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

This weekend is usually a time when New Hampshire sugar houses are open to the public for events and tastings. But this year, the 25th Annual Maple Weekend is canceled over coronavirus concerns.

And that's been a big blow to local producers.

Sue Folsom, owner of Folsom’s Sugar House in Chester, said the annual event is a huge revenue generator for both big and small maple makers.

"Oh, it is enormously important to the maple producers in this state," Folsom said. "For a lot of producers, it is the major source of income for their maple crop every year."

People age 50 and older are around 2-and-a-half times more likely to progress to a severe case of COVID-19. That's according to a new study that quantifies the risk factors that increase the odds that people infected with the coronavirus will develop a severe case of the disease.

Updated at 5:53 p.m. ET

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., has become the first senator to test positive for the coronavirus. His staff says he is asymptomatic.

In a statement released on Sunday, Paul's deputy chief of staff, Sergio Gor, wrote:

File Photo, NHPR

On this edition of The Exchange, we get an update from Dr. Ben Chan, New Hampshire's state epidemiologist, about the current extent of coronavirus in the Granite State.

Then we talk with healthcare leaders in Manchester, the state's largest city, to discuss their efforts to prepare for an expected surge in cases and steps they are taking to keep healthcare workers safe with a shortage in personal protective equipment such as gloves, masks, gowns.

We also hear from a family doctor about challenges his practice is facing in addressing medical issues in addition to Covid-19.

Air date: Monday, March 23, 2020

Updated at 8:52 p.m. ET

Ohio, Louisiana and Delaware became the latest states on Sunday to announce statewide stay-at-home orders as the toll from the coronavirus outbreak grew to more than 31,000 cases and 390 deaths.

Courtesy of Heron Pond Farm

Two main sources of income for family farms were uprooted this week due to the coronavirus: many of the farm-to-table restaurants that source locally grown meat and produce aren’t buying at the same volume, and spring farmers markets are now closed, as well, due to the ban on public gatherings in New Hampshire.

So to keep the lettuces, kales and cabbages moving along, some local farms on the Seacoast are banding together to offer home delivery in the region.

This spring was supposed to be an exciting time for Xander Christou. He's a senior in high school in Austin, Texas, and was looking forward to all the fun: prom, senior skip day and of course, graduation.

Pregnancy can sometimes be an uncertain and stressful period in the best of circumstances. But during a pandemic, that anxiety can quickly multiply. Researchers are working quickly to learn more about what the new coronavirus — as well as its impact on our daily lives — means right now for people who are pregnant. And health care providers are game-planning with mothers about how to best manage care in light of growing limits on public contact.

Here's what we know so far.

Am I more at risk if I'm pregnant??

As COVID-19 spreads rapidly through the United States, many American doctors could soon be making the decisions that overwhelmed health care workers in Italy are already facing: Which patients get lifesaving treatment, and which ones do not?

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