Coronavirus Coverage - Data and Resources | New Hampshire Public Radio

Coronavirus Coverage - Data and Resources

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

As NHPR tracks the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in New Hampshire, we’ve been asking you to tell us how your life is changing because of coronavirus - and we’ve welcomed your questions

Here, we answer some of your questions, and share other important information about the coronavirus and how to stay safe.

As NHPR tracks the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in New Hampshire, we’ve been asking you to tell us how your life is changing because of coronavirus - and we’ve welcomed your questions

Our most frequent questions have continued to be about traveling in and out of the Granite State, especially during the summer months. 

CDC

New Hampshire identified its first case of COVID-19 on March 2. NHPR has been tracking new developments since then, as the number of confirmed cases and testing capacity — at public and private labs — has expanded.

Josh Rogers/NHPR

As businesses reopen and people increase their travel and navigate the summer, we talk with our state epidemiologists about the current spread of COVID-19 in New Hampshire, and the latest information about the virus.  We also talk about risk assessment as the pandemic continues. 

Click here for all of NHPR's coverage on the coronavirus

 Air date: Thursday, July 9, 2020. 

Governor Sununu has set aside $35 million from the CARES Act Coronavirus Relief Fund to provide housing assistance for individuals who have trouble paying their rent and utilities as a result of the pandemic.

Todd Bookman, NHPR

In early May, as New Hampshire officials began to lift restrictions on some corners of the economy, Gov. Chris Sununu announced that the state would distribute its stockpile of disposable masks to businesses and nonprofits for free.

Now, thanks to newly provided public records, we can see where those masks ended up — and which businesses were the biggest beneficiaries.

Courtesy Anne Sosin

When the coronavirus pandemic first hit New Hampshire, many public health leaders worried about the state’s rural communities. Smaller towns tend to have more elderly patients and fewer health care resources. Some doctors warned that even a small number of cases could overwhelm the region’s hospitals.

But a new report finds that rural areas of Vermont and New Hampshire handled the coronavirus outbreak better than expected. The authors of the report, Dartmouth College Professors Elizabeth Carpenter-Song and Anne Sosin, joined NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello to discuss some of the highlights of their study. 


Conducting the 2020 Census During A Pandemic

Jun 10, 2020
Sara Plourde, NHPR

We discuss the 2020 census, with all its implications for political districts, federal funding, and community services. Even with the coronavirus pandemic, the census is still taking place, although some information will be gathered differently this year. We chat about how the census will be conducted and its impact on our nation. 

Air date: Thursday, June 11, 2020. 

In April, New Orleans health officials realized their drive-through testing strategy for the coronavirus wasn't working. The reason? Census tract data revealed hot spots for the virus were located in predominantly low-income African-American neighborhoods where many residents lacked cars.

UNH Carsey School

A recent poll says New Hampshire residents' trust in science and government advice hasn't changed much, even as the coronavirus spreads.

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire's Survey Center polled about 1,800 residents in March and April.

Subscribe to our COVID-19 newsletter for the latest updates from NHPR.

The U.S. has the most coronavirus deaths of any country in the world — on May 11, the death toll passed 80,000.

And that's likely an undercount.

CDC

We know you have questions about COVID-19, and our newsroom wants to help get you answers. Ask a question below, and you may hear the answer on The Exchange or as part of a news story, or you could see the answer on our updated FAQ page.

Your question can be about health, the economic impacts of the pandemic, what rules you should be following, or anything else related to this unprecedented time.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu issued a stay-at-home order on March 26, 2020 in an effort to contain the spread of coronavirus in New Hampshire. Here is what you need to know about the amended order, which is now in effect until May 31. 

NOTE: THIS STORY CONTAINS OUTDATED INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE. PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR THE LATEST VERSION.

Bookmark NHPR's liveblog here for coronavirus updates in New Hampshire.

New Hampshire’s 'Stay at Home 2.0' – What Has Changed?

New Hampshire’s original stay-at-home order in response to the COVID-19 pandemic was set to expire on Monday, May 4. On Friday, May 1, Gov. Chris Sununu announced a plan to relax some aspects of that order and re-open parts of the economy.

CDC

A report by the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services shows that COVID-19 continues to disproportionately affect the state’s Latino and black community.

Race and ethnicity is known for about 79 percent of cases in New Hampshire.

Latinos account for about 7 percent of those cases; and African Americans for 5.6 percent. As a percentage of the population, New Hampshire is 3.9 percent Latino and 1.4 percent black.

Mediaweek via Flickr CC

Updated on April 27, 2020 at 10:24 a.m.  

Following an executive order from Governor Sununu and the passage of the federal CARES Act, many more people are now able to apply for unemployment benefits as a result of COVID-19, including those who need to quarantine, and those who are self-employed.

The Exchange spoke with Deputy Commissioner Richard Lavers of N.H. Employment Security in March and April. You can find those full conversations here and here.

Read all of NHPR's coronavirus coverage here. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The number of new coronavirus tests being processed each day in New Hampshire has remained relatively flat for about a month, according to an analysis by NHPR. This comes even as state health officials say they want to see more testing here.

Todd Selig

As cases of COVID-19 continue to rise in the Granite State, and questions remain about resources, safety, and the longevity of stay-at-home orders, we talk with state epidemiologists to get the latest recommendations and information about the coronavirus pandemic. 

Air date: Tuesday, April 21, 2020.

Dartmouth College-UNH Survey Center New Hampshire COVID-19 study

A new survey from UNH and Dartmouth College shows widespread economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic in New Hampshire, but also widespread agreement that social distancing is more important than restarting the economy.

Results from the survey show one-third of working New Hampshire residents say they have either lost their job or had their hours cut as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Dan Tuohy; NHPR

Update (April 16, 2020 at 2:40 p.m): According to their website, the SBA "is unable to accept new applications at this time for the Paycheck Protection Program or the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL)-COVID-19 related assistance program (including EIDL Advances) based on available appropriations funding.

EIDL applicants who have already submitted their applications will continue to be processed on a first-come, first-served basis."

On Thursday, state officials shared a model they say is helping them predict the possible trajectory of COVID-19 in New Hampshire. According to Gov. Chris Sununu and state epidemiologist Ben Chan, early signs show that the state’s strategies of social distancing and community mitigation are helping to control the spread of COVID-19.   

Below are some answers to frequently asked questions about the models the state is using.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu and State Epidemiologist Dr. Ben Chan said Thursday that recent data show restrictions designed to slow the spread of the coronavirus in New Hampshire are working, but they also acknowledged the limitations of any effort to predict the precise impact and timeline of the pandemic at a time when conditions are widely expected to worsen before they improve.

CDC.gov

Almost daily, state public health officials have updated the total number of coronavirus cases identified in New Hampshire. On Monday, that number surpassed 100 — a grim milestone.

Local media outlets, including New Hampshire Public Radio, have reported on this growing number as a sign of the virus’ spread in the state.

Click here for our live blog for the lates updates on coronavirus in New Hampshire