Coronavirus Coverage - Communities and Helpers | New Hampshire Public Radio

Coronavirus Coverage - Communities and Helpers

After I shared my family's experience in trying to care for my 92-year-old grandmother in the pandemic, I wanted to know: How do we help older people feel safe and comfortable — and happy — in these times?

Flikr Creative Commons / Grumpy-Puddin

Some New Hampshire recovery centers say they are dealing with a lapse in funds as the state waits to receive more federal money.  

An official from the Department of Health and Human Services says the state applied for a national State Opioid Response grant in May. Now, they’re waiting for at least $28.1 million from the US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration. 

This funding provides support to 16 recovery centers in the state. 

Josh Rogers | NHPR

A religious tent revival expected to draw hundreds of out-of-staters to New Ipswich over the next week got underway over the weekend. State and local officials raised public health alarms about the gathering, but the revival goers were inconspicuous in New Ipswich on Sunday.

Dmoore5556 / Creative Commons

A continuación, lee las noticias de New Hampshire y también, una conversación que tuvimos con la Dra.Trinidad Tellez, directora de la oficina de la equidad en salud, sobre el efecto desproporcionado de la pandemia en las comunidades de color y el rol de los trabajadores comunitarios de salud.

También puedes escuchar las noticias y la entrevista en el siguiente audio. 

Sean Hurley

The Plymouth Selectboard will host a town-wide zoom hearing Monday evening on a proposed ordinance mandating face coverings in town. Over the weekend, on the town common, an anti-mask mandate protest was held. NHPR’s Sean Hurley was there. 

Update: Plymouth's Select Board voted for the mask mandate on August 10. Click here for that story.

Courtesy of Jeff Goodrich

New Hampshire's ban on evictions has ended. Gov. Chris Sununu announced back in March that landlords were not allowed to evict tenants during the public health emergency. But as protections for renters expire, many residents are still in danger of losing their homes.

Jeff Goodrich is an attorney with the Legal Advice and Referral Center, which provides legal services for New Hampshire's low-income families.

He's joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about the end of the state's eviction ban.

Savannah Maher/NHPR

Claremont’s third annual Rural Pride is moving online this year due to COVID-19. Matt Mooshian, founder of Rural Outright, the organization behind the event, says it’s important to still hold Pride events this year, especially in rural areas.

Via khsmwv.com

High school graduations typically follow a pretty familiar script: Graduates sitting side by side in caps and gowns, each one getting a handshake from the principal as they receive their diploma.

But in this unprecedented year, high schools across New Hampshire have had to go back to the drawing board to figure out what they can pull off that’s both safe and celebratory.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

For the faithful, live streaming Sunday Mass is akin to watching fireworks on television: you can see it, and hear it, but you don’t feel it.

“It’s not the same,” said Mary Sanphy of Concord, who has spent the past few months praying alongside a screen. 

On Sunday, though, Sanphy and other Catholics in New Hampshire were able to receive Holy Communion in person for the first time in more than two months.

As long as social distancing is observed and other guidelines followed, the Diocese of Manchester is allowing parishes to offer the Eucharist.

Jessica Hunt; NHPR

  In the midst of the pandemic, the importance of human relationships has become clearer than ever. We talk with people who have been thinking about how to maintain relationships and create community as we work from home and remain physically apart.  We also look at how our view of technology is evolving, and what is lost when life is online. 

 

This is a rebroadcast. Original Airdate: Thursday, May 14, 2020

 

 

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Coronavirus outbreaks at New Hampshire facilities serving the elderly continue unabated. Just two days after state officials announced a major outbreak of COVID-19 cases at a Manchester long-term care facility, the number increased from 51 to 84, with four deaths attributed to the coronavirus.  

 

 

 

How Do We Create Connections in an Online World?

May 13, 2020
Jessica Hunt

In the midst of the pandemic, the importance of human relationships has become clearer than ever. We talk with people who have been thinking about how to maintain relationships and create community as we work from home and remain physically apart.  We also look at how our view of technology is evolving, and what is lost when life is online. 

 

Airdate: Thursday, May 14, 2020

 

Sean Hurley

In a normal year, theaters around the state would be preparing for their summer seasons. With gatherings currently forbidden and uncertainty hanging over their heads, many are simply canceling the whole season. Others are postponing or, as NHPR’s Sean Hurley found out, discovering new ways to reach an audience. 

  Sign up for NHPR's email newsletter for more coverage of coronavirus in N.H.

Mary McIntyre / NHPR

Caregivers are one group of essential workers who have continued showing up for their jobs daily amid the coronavirus pandemic.

At the Spaulding Youth Center in Northfield, staff work with children with disabilities and children who've been neglected or abused.

This story is part of our series Lifelines: Addressing Trauma in the Age of COVID-19 

Often workers have their own past trauma, or they can experience secondary trauma on the job.

Peter Biello/NHPR

Two months ago, before the coronavirus pandemic transformed the world, I met in Manchester with a man named Mukhtar Idahow. He was born in Somalia, raised in Kenya, and has been advocating for refugees in New Hampshire for about 15 years.

This story is part of our series Lifelines: Addressing Trauma in the Age of COVID-19

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

Though the building is closed to the public, staff at the Portsmouth Public Library are continuing to collect public documents and newspaper articles to add to their archive – including those on COVID-19.

Now, the library wants to include the personal side of the pandemic in their collection.

They’re asking Seacoast residents to chronicle their pandemic experience through an online community diary.

U.S. Army

As Granite Staters isolate themselves, many individuals, businesses, and organizations are in need of assistance and searching for help during a tumultuous time.

Have you been helping out in your own community? Have you seen friends or neighbors helping others in special ways? Do you know of a way that residents can get involved?

We'll discuss ways that you can help out during the coronavirus pandemic, whether that be by sewing face masks, volunteering, or making a donation. 

Air date: Tuesday, April 28, 2020.

VIA Q1045

With schools closed for the rest of the year, many major milestones for high schoolers are suddenly being canceled as well - everything from graduations, to proms, spring sports, and school plays.

Because of this, teens may be feeling overwhelming loss, disappointment, and uncertainty about the future, which can lead to more serious mental health problems like anxiety and depression.

NHPR's Peter Biello spoke with Kallie Provencher, the school social worker at Nashua High School North, to learn more about how teens are coping with the COVID-19 crisis.

Laura Byrne / HIV/HCV Resource Center

Many once face-to-face interactions have moved online during COVID-19, including for people who are in recovery from a substance use disorder.

But the pandemic has also introduced challenges to providing treatment in a time of social distancing. 

Laura Byrne has been spending more time driving around the Upper Valley these days. 

She’s been meeting clients for a mobile syringe exchange.  With COVID-19, the organization Byrne leads - the HIV/HCV resource center - had to ramp up its mobile services. 

Alan Mountjoy

New Hampshire Health and Human Services Commissioner Lori Shibinette says there are a handful of people in the state's homeless population who have either tested positive for or exhibit symptoms of COVID-19.

Click here to sign up for our coronavirus newsletter to get the latest news and updates.

Sara Plourde | NHPR

Small businesses are struggling right now...but people *are* trying to help. Are you a small business owner? Are you doing your best to support the businesses you love? We want to talk to you!

This program aired on Tuesday, April 14th. 

NHPR's newsroom needs your help. Click here to make a donation to support our work. 

Listen:

raymondclarkeimages/Flickr

While large sectors of the economy are shuttered at the moment, there are still plenty of products to ship, and goods to deliver to peoples’ homes.

Truckers, a loud but often invisible piece of the market, are in the middle of those transactions, logging thousands of miles back and forth across New England.

CDC

Health care workers in New Hampshire are at the center of the state’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. Patients rely on them, hospitals scramble to buy gear to protect them, and citizens laud them as heroes in this national crisis.

But what is it like be a health care worker right now? NHPR’s Jason Moon reports the experience of working on the front lines during this pandemic can be complicated.

Ben Kremer / NH Youth Movement

Protesters gathered outside the Strafford County detention center in Dover on Saturday to call for the release of undocumented immigrants and asylum seekers, held at the facility under a federal contract, to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Courtesy of Facebook/Nashua Children's Home

The state’s residential facilities and detention center for youth are modifying operations in response to the coronavirus pandemic, but some advocates say change isn’t coming fast enough.

As of April 1, about 350 young people were in residential facilities operated by 13 different providers across the state. About half of the youth are involved in the juvenile justice system; the rest were placed by child protective services.

Mark Melamut

For the past few weeks, Rabbi Mark Melamut has been practicing the traditional four questions that are asked during the first night of Passover with his 10-year-old son. 

Passover started on Wednesday this year, and in normal times, Melamut would invite friends and family to his home for a Seder, a big ceremonial meal.

Courtesy

Most of us have never experienced anything quite like this moment. But Sharon Eng and her husband, who today own a manufacturing company in Belmont, happened to find themselves in the middle of another disease outbreak, on the other side of the world, in 2003. 

“My husband and I moved to Hong Kong in 1989, and we returned to the States in 2005,” said Eng. “So we got to see a lot of changes happen around the world. But in the latter part of our stay there, of course one of the most impactful changes, was when SARS hit.”

Cori Princell; NHPR

Stay-at-home orders and quarantine measures may have life-threatening consequences for those experiencing domestic/intimate partner violence, and also present challenges for law enforcement and support organizations. 

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, call 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or 866-644-3574.

Air date: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 from 10-11 a.m.

For children experiencing abuse or neglect, schools and support services are essential. With schools closed and stay-at-home orders in place until at least the beginning of May, we talk with those working with vulnerable children about how they're adapting to these challenges, and what we all can do to keep kids safe. 

If you suspect a child is experiencing abuse or neglect, please call 800-894-5533 or 603-271-6562.

Air date: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 from 9-10 a.m.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

There’s a gem of a plot of land in Kensington, in the southeastern corner of the state, that is usually closed to the public.

But with the stress of the coronavirus taking a toll, the owners of the Alnoba property are opening their arms to the community.

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