coronavirus

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For veterinarian Sabrina Estabrook-Russett, the COVID-19 pandemic is further proof that the medical world could use a paradigm shift –  closer collaboration between veterinarians and doctors who treat humans.

Dr. Estabrook-Russett, who has worked on foreign veterinary projects involving white rhinos in South Africa and street dogs in Sri Lanka, is owner of Court Street Veterinary Hospital in Keene. She and veterinarian Michael Dutton joined The Exchange to discuss how the coronavirus has affected veterinary practices. Dr. Dutton is founder of Weare Animal Hospital and Exotic Bird Clinic and the Hopkinton Animal Hospital.

 

(For the full conversation, listen here. Excerpts here have been edited slightly for clarity).

 

“I think we've got a lot to offer in terms of research that is already underway, that's already being worked on, that could then be applied to human medicine," Estabrook-Russett said. 

 

 

 

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Coronavirus outbreaks at New Hampshire facilities serving the elderly continue unabated. Just two days after state officials announced a major outbreak of COVID-19 cases at a Manchester long-term care facility, the number increased from 51 to 84, with four deaths attributed to the coronavirus.  

 

 

 

In Depth: Health Care Workers and COVID-19

May 20, 2020
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

This week on The Exchange:  An in-depth series on the impact of COVID-19 on our health care system. Among those most vulnerable to this disease are health care workers; many have dealt with shortages of testing supplies, equipment, and staff, as well as shifting guidelines from authorities. We talk with three New Hampshire caregivers, all in the early years of their careers, about how this pandemic has affected them and their workplaces, as well as how these experiences might help shape the future of their fields. 

Air date: May 21, 2020

Courtesy of Camp Yavneh

The Governor's Economic Re-Opening Taskforce unanimously approved reopening guidance plans Tuesday afternoon for amateur sports, overnight summer camps, day camps, acupuncture, museums and restaurants serving wedding events.

The guidelines will now be sent to the Division of Public Health Services for approval. Then, they must be approved by Gov. Chris Sununu before they are implemented.  

Sarah Gibson, NHPR

The University System of New Hampshire plans to work with the state Community College System to safely welcome students back to college campuses across the state soon.

Casey McDermott / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu has authorized spending millions on New Hampshire’s COVID-19 relief efforts in recent weeks, using powers he established through a state of emergency declaration two months ago. He’s done so without the oversight typically provided by lawmakers and the Executive Council.

Jon Greenberg, NHPR

Planet Fitness is facing a potential class action lawsuit filed by a member who alleges the New Hampshire-based gym chain charged membership fees despite the facilities closing their doors due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A group convened by the Department of Education met for the first time Thursday to figure out how New Hampshire’s schools can resume in the fall.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

New Hampshire retail stores, hair salons, and barbershops will be permitted to allow customers back inside on Monday for the first time since Gov. Chris Sununu instituted limits to curtail the spread of coronavirus nearly two months ago.

Courtesy photo

Living in Manhattan, Adrianna Benn thinks she’s growing up faster than most 15-year-olds. Her mom, Leila Benn, calls it a “fast life” and says Adrianna’s friends are “advanced.” Credit cards, phones, Ubers to fancy sushi restaurants -- at 15 years old.

“I feel like living in New York, I have to keep up with everyone and I don’t really like it,” Adrianna said on the phone recently, sitting on the couch with her mom in their Upper East Side apartment. “Everyone is so mature. They act like they’re in their 20s at a frat party or something.”

Flckr Creative Commons

They may have closed their doors due to the coronavirus but libraries have been busy on behalf of patrons and the wider community, from lending laptops and hot spots to using 3 D printers to make parts for masks. Libraries and librarians across the country are also pondering the future, collaborating with researchers to determine best practices for handling books and other materials while protecting the health and safety of staff and the communities they serve.

CDC

Gov. Charlie Baker is extending the state's stay-at-home advisory until May 18 as Massachusetts continues to battle the spread of the coronavirus.

Baker said Tuesday that all nonessential businesses will also remain closed until the new deadline.

[New Hampshire's stay-at-home order is in effect until May 4. Read Governor Sununu's order]

Authorities say the number of deaths linked to the coronavirus at a Massachusetts home for veterans has risen to 67.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner has assembled a six-person "select committee" to advise his office on how to spend the $3.2 million in emergency election funding the state has received as part of a recent federal COVID-19 relief package. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The number of new coronavirus tests being processed each day in New Hampshire has remained relatively flat for about a month, according to an analysis by NHPR. This comes even as state health officials say they want to see more testing here.

LRGHealthcare Facebook Page

In the middle of March, LRGHealthcare — already drowning in debt — added more stones to its pockets. To prepare for a possible surge in coronavirus patients, the parent company of Lakes Region General Hospital in Laconia and Franklin Regional Hospital was forced to cancel all of its elective procedures.

Dartmouth College-UNH Survey Center New Hampshire COVID-19 study

A new survey from UNH and Dartmouth College shows widespread economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic in New Hampshire, but also widespread agreement that social distancing is more important than restarting the economy.

Results from the survey show one-third of working New Hampshire residents say they have either lost their job or had their hours cut as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Courtesy of Cadence Solsky

It's been a tough week for New Hampshire students, teachers and parents.

Governor Chris Sununu officially closed schools for the rest of the academic year, which means seniors like Cadence Solsky of Concord will spend their last semester of high school at home.  

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