Climate Change | New Hampshire Public Radio

Climate Change

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Middle schoolers in Portsmouth on Wednesday showcased their ideas to make their city more sustainable – and more prepared for climate change – within the next decade.

The eighth graders based their projects on the United Nations' sustainable development goals – to tackle climate change, inequality, public health issues and more.

The conversation on climate change has a new vigor in recent months, thanks in part to the Green New Deal. Though it was voted down in a procedural vote in the U.S. Senate, the non-binding resolution has intensified conversation on climate and yielded climate policy packages from both sides of the aisle: Republican Rep. Max Gaetz’s Green Real Deal and Senator Lamar Alexander’s A New Manhattan Project.

The Sununu Family And Climate Change Over The Years

Apr 4, 2019

Governor Chris Sununu comes from one of New Hampshire's most prominent political families. His father, John H. Sununu, served as governor and later as chief of staff for former President George H.W. Bush. His brother, John E. Sununu, served as a U.S. congressman and senator. In the latest episode of Outside/In, a podcast about the outdoors, NHPR's Annie Ropeik and Sam Evans-Brown track the Republican Party's views on climate change over the years through the lens of this one political family.

Jim Richman/Flickr

Climate change is a hot topic on Capitol Hill and on the 2020 presidential campaign trail. And it is mobilizing younger Americans: children suing the federal government, grassroots campaigns pushing for the Green New Deal, and student-led walkouts. 

As the legislature weighs net-metering and offshore wind, we talk with young New Hampshire leaders about the state's climate future. 

Josh Carloni / NHFG

Regulators are taking comments on plans to expand a lucrative new crab fishery that’s stirring interest in the Gulf of Maine.

Jonah crabs are a native species that, until recently, was mainly caught as bycatch – by accident – in lobster pots.

Now, as warming waters push the lobster fishery north, more fishermen – especially in southern New England – are targeting Jonah crabs on purpose to supplement their income.

New Hampshire Fish and Game biologist Josh Carloni says in Northern New England and the Gulf of Maine, lobster is still king – but that could change.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

At an annual breakfast Friday in Durham, environmentalists said more federal and local action is needed to slow the effects of climate change.

New Hampshire U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and Rep. Chris Pappas both spoke at the event, saying climate change demands a local response but poses a global existential threat.

Pappas says the Trump administration should engage more on the issue with other world powers – such as China and India, both top contributors of carbon emissions.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The melty weather in New Hampshire this winter has been a big problem for some kinds of seasonal recreation -- and it’s all part of a long-term warming trend.

As this season comes to an end, some of the region's favorite pastimes are preparing for an uncertain future.

Windblown Cross Country Skiing and Snowshoeing is tucked into the hills of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, not far from the Massachusetts border.

On a bright, brisk Friday in late February, the parking lot is thawing into mud – but the snowy trails that lead into the woods are crisp and freshly groomed.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Students from the Seacoast area participated in Friday’s worldwide Youth Climate Strike, a coordinated event demanding immediate action on climate change.

In Portsmouth’s Market Square, a thick crowd of students from local high schools held up signs, passed around a bullhorn, and called for the end of fossil fuels.

Flickr Creative Commons

As the climate warms, Americans – and New Englanders – appear to be finding abnormal temperatures less and less remarkable.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

New Hampshire drivers may start to notice bumpier roads in this latest thaw after a cold snap – both damage and weather that could happen more often as the climate warms.

Brian Wallstin

Last week's cold snap gives way to much milder temperatures this week.

Climate scientists say it’s all part of a warming trend in New Hampshire – where winters are heating up faster than in most of the rest of the country.

New research shows the state is on the leading edge of an increase in annual low temperatures across the country.  

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Last weekend's winter storm caused only moderate flooding on New Hampshire's Seacoast. But it provided a window into how rising seas will make flooding more frequent, bringing challenges to the state's coastal communities.

DAN TUOHY / NHPR

A new report from Columbia University and First Street Foundation finds that sea level rise and associated tidal flooding have already soaked up value from the coastal New England real estate market.

Researchers say homes have forgone $400 million in relative value since 2005. And in New Hampshire, it has cost homeowners $15 million in lost value.

Hampton Beach Village District

A new report says sea level rise has already cost New Hampshire more than $15 million in coastal property valuation in recent years.

Researchers from Columbia University and the First Street Foundation, a national nonprofit, analyzed 2.5 million coastal homes in four New England states.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

State legislators will consider how to prepare New Hampshire for the effects of climate change this session – including with one bill that would help coastal towns facing rising seas.

Seacoast-area state Senator David Watters spoke at the Seacoast Environmental Film Festival Saturday, after a documentary about sea level rise on the Chesapeake Bay.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Even if countries cut greenhouse gas emissions immediately, New Hampshire will get warmer and wetter within the next three decades, and towns need to plan accordingly.

That was the topic of Nashua's first Resilient Nashua Summit, which the city hosted Tuesday as part of a year-long initative to gather input on its plan for dealing with natural disasters exacerbated by climate change. 

Drawdown is when global greenhouse gases in the atmosphere begin to decline on a year-to-year basis.  It's also a nonprofit organization and a book.  Project Drawdown analyzes 100 solutions to rollback greenhouse emissions and comes to some surprising conclusions about what provides the most impact.  Our discussion will focus on the solutions within the sectors of energy, food, and women and children.

Sean Linehan / NOAA

Most wetlands permits issued in New England would not be affected by a proposed change in federal environmental rules.

The Trump administration wants to narrow which wetlands receive federal protection under the Clean Water Act to only those that directly feed navigable waters.

Steve and Michelle Gerdes / Flicker CC

New Hampshire's members of Congress say they support the call for a select House committee on a "Green New Deal."

The campaign is being led by the group Sunrise Movement and incoming Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.

Her proposed committee would draft a plan by 2020 to move the U.S. economy off fossil fuels, and combat climate change, by creating new jobs and technology in renewable energy.

Chris Jensen

The U.S. government released its Fourth National Climate Assessment report at the end of last week that shows the effects of climate change are already here – both in New England and all over the country.

Jennifer Jacobs is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of New Hampshire, and she’s the lead author on that report’s chapter on transportation and infrastructure.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Jacobs about her work and what it means for New Hampshire.

woodfin / Flickr CC

New research suggests New Hampshire forests could help store more climate-warming carbon dioxide while growing higher-value trees.

The study, from Clark University and the Nature Conservancy, says better land management – especially reforestation – could store up to a fifth of America’s climate-warming carbon emissions. 

A new report suggests New Hampshire's Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant will be essential to curbing the effects of climate change in the coming years.

Seabrook and Millstone Station in Connecticut will be the only two nuclear plants left in New England after next year.

They're also some of the most profitable nuclear plants in the country, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Public Service of New Hampshire

New Hampshire is the only New England state that didn't join a coalition opposing the proposed rollback of the Clean Power Plan.

The EPA wants to replace the Obama-era plan with a rule that loosens carbon emissions standards for coal-fired power plants.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Last Halloween was not a great one for Chelsie Lent. A bad storm blew across New Hampshire, flooding part of a campground she owns in Warren, along the Baker River.

The water swept away campfire rings, knocked picnic tables across the property, destroyed a road and bath house, and dropped all kinds of debris, she said.

It was symptomatic of a changing climate here. 

Wildcat Mountain Facebook

The Wildcat Mountain ski resort in the White Mountains will have the earliest opening ever in its 61-year history Saturday.

It comes after a mid-October cold snap that bucks the overall warming trend for New England winters.

Wildcat Mountain spokesman Jack Fagone says it's usually not cold enough for snowmaking until closer to Thanksgiving.

That wasn't the case this year – with a recent week of weather in the 20s and lower, as well as a surprising amount of natural snowfall.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A controversial conference in Portsmouth Friday focused on economic solutions to climate change – while questioning some mainstream scientific views. 

The Portsmouth Conference was the first put on by Citizens Count, a nonpartisan voter education nonprofit.

Its founder is prominent New Hampshire businessman Paul Montrone, who sat in on the conference at a hotel in Portsmouth.

Jason Moon / NHPR

Several climate science skeptics from around the world will join a controversial conference in Portsmouth over the next two days.

The event, known as the Portsmouth Conference, lost support from the city and the University of New Hampshire because of its roster of speakers.

Northeast Naturalist via Flickr CC

Researchers have finished their largest study to date on how ticks and warming winters are hurting moose in Northern New England.

The data shows unprecedented death rates among moose calves -- more than 50 percent in four of the past five years, plus lower reproductive rates in adult moose across Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont.

courtesy photo

The New Hampshire Film Festival’s first Virtual Reality Lounge opened Friday in Portsmouth, with four films about climate change.

 

Dark curtains hung from the walls, dimly lit by black lights. Ten festival-goers took their seats on swivel chairs. They turned in their seats to get a full view of a California wildfire or a desert in Somalia.

 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A group of New Hampshire legislators and renewable energy advocates issued their response Thursday to the governor’s 10-year energy strategy.

The volunteer coalition wrote plans for how the state can rapidly shrink its carbon footprint—and people’s bills—by investing in energy efficiency, renewable energy and new technologies.

They call it a roadmap to their goal of using renewable power for all of New Hampshire’s electricity by 2040.

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