Climate Change | New Hampshire Public Radio

Climate Change

/Kristoferb - Creative Commons

While efficiency upgrades can save money and cut back on your carbon footprint, how much should we invest, especially during a pandemic? It’s been a big debate for N.H. utility regulators. The Public Utilities Commission delayed their decision on this issue in December 2020 and is expected to make a ruling by mid-February 2021. As part of  NHPR’s By Degrees climate reporting project, we examined the pros and cons of greater efficiency, and whether businesses and residents should have to deal with up-front costs to create savings down the road. What does this debate say about the state’s energy future? 

Airdate: Monday, Jan. 25, 2021. Original airdate: Thursday, Dec. 17, 2020

The Boston Globe

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del viernes 22 de enero.

Escucha haciendo click en el audio o léelas en esta publicación. 

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Hoy comienza registro de vacunación para residentes de 65 años o más

The impacts of climate change could prompt millions of Americans to relocate in coming decades, moving inland away from rising seas, or north to escape rising temperatures.

Judith and Doug Saum have moved already, recently leaving their home outside Reno, Nev.

A mural has "climate justice" on side with blue skies and green grass. The other half has "climate chaos," filled with smoke, dark skies and brown ground.
Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Escrito por Daniela Allee y Annie Ropeik, Traducción de María Silvia Aguirre

Defensores en New Hampshire dicen que tienen un sentimiento de alivio -- y de cauto optimismo -- luego de que el presidente Joe Biden firmó algunas órdenes ejecutivas relacionadas a inmigración y cambio climático el día miércoles 20 de enero. 

A mural has "climate justice" on side with blue skies and green grass. The other half has "climate chaos," filled with smoke, dark skies and brown ground.
Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Advocates in New Hampshire say they’re feeling a sense of relief -- and cautious optimism -- after President Joe Biden signed several executive orders Wednesday related to immigration and climate change.

Jesse Costa / WBUR


Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Studies show that climate change could prompt millions of Americans to relocate in the coming decades. And by some measures, New Hampshire and northern New England could be ideal places to move.

But preparing for those potential waves of climate migrants will be no easy task – and some are already arriving.


The landmark Supreme Court ruling known as Massachusetts v. Environmental Protection Agency held that greenhouse gases were pollutants that could be regulated by the executive branch, and defined de facto federal climate policy in the United States for a decade.

Could it soon be reversed? 

BOEM

State senators are working on a bill that would have New Hampshire spur the development of major offshore wind projects and other renewable energy in the region.

The bill comes from state Sen. David Watters, a Dover Democrat. He previewed it at a late-December meeting of a bipartisan Senate wind commission, and said the aim is to create new zero-carbon energy and bring jobs to the state.

Kate Brindley for NHPR

This past year was another of the hottest years on record in New Hampshire, as the warming trends of climate change continue -- faster in this region than many others, especially in winter. 

From January to November of 2020, New Hampshire saw its fourth-hottest average temperatures since the late 1800s, according to state climatologist and UNH associate professor Mary Stampone.

NHPUC

The state Public Utilities Commission says it needs more time to decide on the future of New Hampshire’s energy efficiency programs, meaning no immediate changes to residents’ utility bills.

Rob_ / Flickr CC

Renewable energy advocates say they expect to be playing defense on perennial policy debates in next year’s Republican state Legislature.

/Kristoferb - Creative Commons

Energy efficiency upgrades can save money and cut back on carbon footprints. but how should much should we invest, especially during a pandemic? It’s been a big debate for N.H. utility regulators in recent weeks.  As part of  NHPR’s By Degrees climate reporting project, we unpack this issues and examine the pros and cons of greater efficiency. Should businesses and residents have to deal with up-front costs to create savings down the road? And what does this debate say about the state’s energy future?

Airdate: Thursday, Dec. 17, 2020

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A health-focused commission on reducing New Hampshire’s greenhouse gas emissions has finished its work with one recommendation: for the state Legislature to do more formal study of the issue next year.

Marie Sapienza via NH Coastal Adaptation Workgroup

NHPR’s new climate change reporting project, By Degrees, begins in the midst of a global pandemic, mass protests against systemic racism, a presidential transition and an economic crisis. 

The incoming Biden administration has promised to combat climate change, while New Hampshire lags behind its neighbors on similar legislation. In many ways, climate change has taken a backseat as governments deal with the social and economic costs of the coronavirus.

We need your help to tell new stories about how Granite Staters are experiencing climate change at this historic moment. How has climate change affected your life, and how have you responded? In what ways are you observing climate change in New Hampshire? What questions do you have?

Portsmouth is closer to postponing its first-in-the-state ban on certain single-use plastics, after the city council voted Monday to advance the proposed delay to a final reading later this month.

The new rules were set to take effect at the end of this year and would be the first municipal ban on plastics in New Hampshire, and one of a growing number in the country. 

maurizio mucciola on Flickr.

In the coming decades, the scale of migration linked to climate change could be dizzying. In ProPublica’s projection, four million people in the United States could find themselves “living at the fringe,” outside ideal conditions for human life.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR News

Citing pandemic-driven economic concerns, top Republican state lawmakers are asking the Public Utilities Commission to put off the adoption of more aggressive energy efficiency goals, currently set to take effect at the start of next year.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The cross country skiing industry is hoping for a big season this winter, as the pandemic is pushing many people to head outdoors for entertainment.

But for the first time in nearly half a century, the trails at Windblown Cross Country Skiing and Snowshoeing will be closed.

Robert Bukaty/AP / via Maine Public

The state of Maine is proposing the country’s first floating offshore wind farm in federal waters off Northern New England.

They hope to win a federal research lease to build a dozen turbines over about 16 square miles. The project will generate 120 megawatts of power.

That's enough to power at least 75,000 homes. It's bigger than many onshore wind projects in the region, but far smaller than the typical full-scale offshore development. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The Seacoast will get multiple king tides that top 10 feet in the next few days, and residents can take photos and videos of the tides' effects for an annual state contest that runs Saturday through Tuesday.

This kind of high tide tends to cause low-level flooding in the streets of ocean-facing towns like Hampton, and in the waterfront parks of Great Bay communities like Dover.

WeatherReMarks/Twitter

Unseasonably warm temperatures the past few days have set records across New Hampshire and Maine, according to the National Weather Service.

Manchester saw record daily highs on Saturday and Sunday – getting close to 80 degrees. Concord also saw a record daily high on Sunday. Previous records were in the low 70s and 60s.

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Yellowstone National Park

The National Parks are seen as a national treasure, touted by some as “America’s Best Idea.” But restricting access to the natural world as a method of conservation is also part of a history of indigenous erasure. 

 

On this episode, we trace the history of the prejoratively-termed “fortress conservation,” from Robin Hood to Fort Yellowstone and the global spread of national parks and preserves.

 

Plus, what the likelihood of another four years of divided government means for climate action.

Gunstock Mountain via Twitter

A new state aid program has already gotten more than 60 requests for bottled water from people whose wells have run dry as a result of the drought, which has persisted in Southeastern New Hampshire despite recent rain and snow.

The dry conditions have improved in much of the state and region, but remain extreme in much of Rockingham and Strafford Counties and surrounding areas, as well as in southern Maine and from Cape Cod into Rhode Island.

Are you noticing any issues with your home's water supply? Send us an email with your story.

David Murray / via NHDES

Democrats describe themselves as the only party taking the threat of climate change seriously. And President Trump’s continued denial of climate science and rollbacks of environmental protections haven’t made it easy for Republicans to change that.

But some New Hampshire conservatives think their candidates could be doing more to run – and win – on climate change.


UNH Agricultural Experiment Station

Certain New England tree species might not grow as fast after severe drought years like this one, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire.

The findings come from an ongoing study on plots of red oak and white pine trees – both key timber species – in Durham and the White Mountains.

courtesy of Federal Bureau of Prisons

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del jueves 29 de octubre. 

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Estado comparte datos actualizados de COVID mientras el contagio comunitario aumenta

El estado registró 113 [ciento trece] nuevos casos confirmados de COVID-19 el miércoles, junto a tres fallecimientos más. Esto lleva el total de muertes en el estado a 478 [cuatrocientos setenta y ocho]. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR file

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del lunes 26 de octubre. 

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Funcionarios advierten que la transmisión del COVID-19 en la comunidad aun ocurre. Hay 1,032 casos activos.

Los funcionarios de salud anunciaron 92 [noventa y dos] nuevos casos de COVID-19 el domingo. Esto lleva el total de casos activos a 1,032 [mil treinta y dos]. 

Shawn St. Hilaire / Courtesy

New Hampshire’s dry conditions are improving after recent rain, but the southeastern part of the state is still in extreme drought. 

The latest update from the National Drought Monitor shows two areas of extreme drought left all across New England. One covers parts of southern Maine across the upper Seacoast toward I-93. The other spans from Cape Cod into Rhode Island.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR file

Climate change policy marks one of the sharpest divides between incumbent Republican Gov. Chris Sununu and his Democratic challenger, Concord state Sen. Dan Feltes.  

NHPR’s Morning Edition host Rick Ganley spoke with reporter Annie Ropeik about how the candidates' differences on this issue put the state at a crossroads on climate action.


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