Christa McAuliffe

Christa McAuliffe Coin Now Law, Benefits FIRST Robotics

Oct 9, 2019
NASA

President Donald Trump has signed into law a bill that will create a commemorative coin to honor Christa McAuliffe, the Concord High School teacher who died in the space shuttle Challenger disaster 33 years ago.

The bill calls for the creation of a $1 coin to raise money for the FIRST Robotics program.

The Treasury is directed to mint and issue up to 350,000 of the $1 silver coins.

The design shall bear an image and McAuliffe's name on one side, and a design on the other side that depicts McAuliffe's legacy as a teacher.

NASA

 

New Hampshire's Democratic congressional delegation is welcoming Senate passage of a bill creating a commemorative coin to honor Christa McAuliffe, the Concord High School teacher who died in the NASA space shuttle Challenger disaster 33 years ago.

Sens. Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan introduced legislation in January to create a $1 coin to raise money for the FIRST Robotics program, while Reps. Annie Kuster and Chris Pappas introduced a House version of the bill. They said the coin would both honor McAuliffe and reaffirm Congress commitment to science education.

NASA

 

New Hampshire's congressional delegation is proposing the creation of a commemorative coin to honor Christa McAuliffe, the Concord High School teacher who died in the NASA space shuttle Challenger disaster 33 years ago.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 5, 2018

Oct 4, 2018

NHPR's president Betsy Gardella  announces her retirement at the end of the year following an investigation into management issues; we talk with NHPR reporter Todd Bookman about how he reported on this story for the station.  U.S. Senator Jeff Flake, who has been at the center of the Brett Kavanaugh controversy, visits the Granite State.  Concord's downtown is looking spiffy lately  -- we learn about the ongoing redevelopment process. And Concord's Christa McAuliffe will be the subject of a feature film.

GUESTS:

NASA

 

The first of Christa McAuliffe's lost lessons finally have been released from space.

McAuliffe, a high school teacher from Concord, New Hampshire, never got to teach from space. She perished during the 1986 launch of shuttle Challenger, along with her six crewmates.

NASA and the science education Challenger Center released a video Tuesday of astronaut-educator Ricky Arnold performing one of the experiments aboard the International Space Station.

Christa McAuliffe's Lost Lessons Finally Taught in Space

Jan 20, 2018
NASA

 Christa McAuliffe's lost lessons are finally getting taught in space.

Thirty-two years after the space shuttle Challenger disaster, a pair of teachers turned astronauts on the International Space Station will pay tribute to McAuliffe by carrying out her science classes.

New Hampshire's U.S. senators have introduced a bill for the creation of a coin in recognition of the 30th anniversary of the space shuttle Challenger disaster and honoring Christa McAuliffe, who was picked to be the first teacher in space.

Proceeds from the sale of the coins would support FIRST programs that inspire young people to pursue opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The program is founded by inventor Dean Kamen.

NASA

It's our Sky Guys: the hunt for 'planet nine' continues, with evidence of a huge, but unseen mass beyond Pluto. The mars rover Opportunity celebrates its twelfth birthday, exploring the red planet long beyond expectations.  And this week, it's your best chance to see Mercury, Venus, Saturn, Mars, and Jupiter lined up across the early morning sky.

Thursday marks 30 years since the break-up of the space shuttle Challenger, which claimed the life of Concord High School teacher Christa McAuliffe.

She was among the seven crew members on board who were killed.

McAuliffe had been selected from more than 11,000 applicants to be the first participant in the NASA Teacher in Space Project.

Jim Van Dongen was news director for New Hampshire Public Radio at the time, filing reports from Cape Canaveral for the station.

He now works as an adjunct professor of English at New Hampshire Technical Institute.