Bernie Sanders

  • U.S. Senator since 2007. Former U.S. Rep. (1991-2007).
  • Elected as Independent from Vermont.
  • 2016 N.H. Democratic Presidential Primary winner.
  • Age: 78
NHPR Staff

The Hillary Clinton campaign has been doing it for weeks, rolling out the names of prominent local backers. Sometimes the names are big, such as Gov. Maggie Hassan. Other times, they are smaller, like Wednesday's endorser, former Executive Councilor Debora Pignatelli.

Either way, the Clinton campaign keeps them coming. But the same thing can’t be said for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who counts no current office holders among his Granite State backers. The question is: Does that matter in this election?

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Bernie Sanders took his campaign for the Democratic nomination for President to the University of New Hampshire Sunday evening for the first time this primary season. The result: a big, enthusiastic crowd.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

New Hampshire Democrats gathered Saturday in Manchester for their state party convention. With five of the party’s six presidential hopefuls as featured speakers, Democrats are far from settled on who their nominee will be. But the party faithful appear happy with how their nominating process is playing out.

This post was updated at 8:30 a.m. ET to include debate metrics from Twitter

Like no doubt millions of Americans, Bernie Sanders tuned in to the Republican debate on CNN. But the Vermont independent who is running for the Democratic nomination for president didn't stop there.

The septuagenarian senator live tweeted the debate, with help from his 24-year-old digital director. That is, until just shy of 10:30 p.m., when he called it quits.

Vermont Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders was preaching to a different kind of choir at Liberty University on Monday.

The Democratic presidential candidate tried to find common ground when talking about poverty and income inequality before the conservative Christian university student body.

Craig: Elen Nivrae via Wikicommons/CC; Sanders: Chris Jensen, NHPR

Here’s an unusual question to ask during presidential primary season: What does Daniel Craig, the actor who plays James Bond, have to do with Democratic hopeful Bernie Sanders?

Kate Harper for NHPR

 

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders says international rivals would be mistaken to assume he wouldn't use military force if that's what circumstances required.

The Vermont senator says the United States should have the strongest military in the world. The U.S. should be prepared to act when it or its allies are threatened or in response to genocide. He says he is prepared to use military force, but only as a last resort.

Delaywaves via Creative Commons

While Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders campaigned in the North Country Monday, down in Claremont, his home-state governor was stumping for his one of his opponents. 

Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin is one of a handful of Democratic Governors to supporting Hillary Clinton’s presidential bid.

“She’s practical, she’s innovative, she’s progressive, and she gets things done. And that’s why I’m so excited about this campaign," Shumlin said.

Chris Jensen/NHPR

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders was back in New Hampshire yesterday, in a swing that took him through the North Country. Over the course of the day, Sanders did his best to stick to the issues, even as continued questions about the Democratic horse-race swirl around the campaign.


Brady Carlson / NHPR

Bernie Sanders brought an estimated 1,000 people to the Woodbury School in Salem for a campaign rally Sunday evening. The Vermont U.S. Senator, who has drawn attention for large crowds at some of his campaign events, noted that supporters filled not only the school gymnasium but an overflow room as well.

A recent Gallup poll showed that more Americans would vote for a Muslim or an atheist for president than they would for a socialist. Yet that’s how Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has described himself throughout his career.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

In this year’s Democratic primary, several candidates have made action on climate change a major part of their campaign. This time around they think it could be a winning issue for them in the general election, and they’re also more comfortable using it to draw distinctions between each other.

Kate Harper for NHPR

A new poll shows Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders only six points behind former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in New Hampshire.

The WMUR Granite State poll released Tuesday shows Clinton with 42 percent of support among likely Democratic voters in the Granite State. Sanders is a close second, with 36 percent support.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign has successfully attracted thousands of enthusiastic volunteers and other supporters. The challenge now is to translate that enthusiasm into success at the polls in early-voting states like New Hampshire.

A recent story by NHPR reporter Sam Evans-Brown examined how Sanders' camp is trying to build an organization -- both in New Hampshire and nationally -- to harness that support once the voting starts. This chart provides a bird's-eye view of what that organization looks like to date.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

The room at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester had 400 seats set out for Bernie Sanders’ town hall meeting on Saturday; all of them were full and people were standing in the aisles. They’ve come for the message Sanders has been delivering with the consistency of a jackhammer for his whole political career.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is back in the Granite State this weekend.

Saturday Sanders collected the endorsement of a major environmental Group, the Friends of the Earth, in Concord, before heading to town hall meetings in Manchester and Exeter. Sunday he’ll do three more town hall meetings in Rollinsford, Franklin and Claremont.

His early stops drew big crowds. “A lot has happened in three months,” he joked in Manchester, “Something happened on the way to a coronation.”

Kate Harper for NHPR

 

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is pressing front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton to support a federal minimum wage of $15 an hour.

The Vermont senator made an appearance Wednesday with striking contract workers on Capitol Hill who are employed as cooks and janitors in a number of federal buildings in Washington. Many of the workers earn less than $11 an hour.

A key strategy of Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign is a plan to use social media to get his message out to millions of people.

There are signs that the race for the Democratic presidential nomination is heating up. As Bernie Sanders rises in many early polls, his economic agenda is drawing the fire of some of Hillary Clinton's supporters.

Sanders Gaining on Clinton in New Hampshire

Jun 27, 2015
Jacob Carozza/NHPR

Senator Bernie Sanders spoke for more than an hour Saturday morning at a town hall at Nashua Community College. The independent from Vermont, who is running for the Democratic Party presidential nomination, covered a wide range of issues, including income inequality, campaign finance reform and climate change.

Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders is on the rise in New Hampshire. But that might not matter if the independent senator from Vermont can't get on the Democratic ballot in the first-in-the-nation primary state.

Due to a quirky New Hampshire filing process — and Sanders' status as an independent rather than a registered Democrat — there are lingering questions about how easy it will be for him to file for the primary next year.

Kate Harper for NHPR

 

Vermont U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders is calling for early presidential candidate debates — possibly this summer — to flesh out opinions and stimulate voter interest.

In an interview with NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday, Sanders said early debates will highlight policy differences and help voters understand candidates' positions.

Sanders, an independent, last week officially declared his candidacy, taking on Hillary Rodham Clinton for the Democratic nomination. Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley entered the Democratic race on Saturday

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Paige Sutherland for NHPR

 

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is in New Hampshire for the first time since kicking off his presidential campaign Tuesday in Burlington. And despite the heat, dozens of people came out to show their support.

New Hampshire voters packed the small space of the New England College campus in Concord – waving Bernie Sanders signs in an attempt to stay cool while they waited for the Senator to arrive.

AP

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is back in New Hampshire for the eleventh time this year.

That is after the Democratic presidential candidate officially kicked off his campaign Tuesday in Burlington, Vt. with free ice cream and live music.

Sanders is scheduled to host a town hall meeting Wednesday afternoon in Concord followed by visits in Epping and Portsmouth.

The registered Independent says his top priorities are reining in Wall Street banks, reducing college debt and increasing the minimum wage.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

On The Political Front is our weekly conversation with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. This week, a look at the New Hampshire primary and the state budget.

So, it’s official: the Democratic presidential primary will include more than just Hillary Clinton. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is in the race, and says he’s in it to win.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders is telling New Hampshire voters to prepare for “a lot of door knocking” as part of his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Sanders kicked off his first visit to the state since announcing his campaign with a house party in Manchester. He characterized himself as an underdog who can counter better-funded candidates with grassroots support from voters.   

Josh Rogers / NHPR

If recently-declared presidential candidate Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders plans to run in the New Hampshire primary, he’ll have to do so as a registered Democrat.

That’s according to Secretary of State Bill Gardner, who says declaring party affiliation has always been a requirement to get on the ballot for state and federal office.

“They all have a part of the form that the person filling it out must fill in the name of the party the person is a registered member of," he said. "That’s standard here and it has been for some time.”

350 Vermont/Flickr

Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders is heading back to New Hampshire this weekend, his first trip after announcing he's running for president.

Sanders will be in Manchester Saturday morning for a house party.

Later in the day, he’ll address the New Hampshire AFL-CIO Convention in North Conway.

As a Senator, Sanders identifies as an independent, but says he plans to challenge former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination.

Kate Harper for NHPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is an independent politician who, on April 30th, made an official announcement of his candidacy for the 2016 Democratic presidential primary. Sanders, a self-described "Democratic Socialist," is a native of Brooklyn, New York.

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