Bernie Sanders

  • U.S. Senator since 2007. Former U.S. Rep. (1991-2007).
  • Elected as Independent from Vermont.
  • 2016 N.H. Democratic Presidential Primary winner.
  • Age: 78

 

Bernie Sanders has been outspending rival Hillary Clinton on ads just as the Democratic presidential race appears to be tightening and voters are tuning in.

In the past three weeks, Sanders' campaign has spent $4.7 million on ads to Clinton's $3.7 million. According to advertising tracker Kantar Media's CMAG, that means 1,000 more Sanders commercials than Clinton ads on broadcast TV.

The Sanders ad burst is coinciding with his rise in preference polls in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Jason Moon for NHPR

In the lobby of the Radisson hotel in downtown Manchester, high school and college students find themselves thrust into a microcosm of the New Hampshire primary. Several presidential campaigns from both parties are here, along with a slew of political professionals, advocacy groups, and other card-carrying political junkies. Stickers, buttons, and email lists are everywhere. There are even cardboard cut-outs of several presidential candidates spread throughout the room.

AP

While campaigning at New England College today, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke of student debt and other domestic policies. His proposals include providing health care for all Americans and free tuition at public colleges. But how will these be paid for? Sen. Sanders spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about this policy idea, and much more. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bernie Sanders generally passes up opportunities to take a dig at Democratic presidential rival Hillary Clinton. And he preaches the virtues of an issue-driven campaign. But Donald Trump clearly gets under his skin.

Sanders says time after time, the Republican front-runner "just comes up with things off the top of his head — that are lies."

And now the Vermont senator says Trump should stop talking about Bill Clinton's sexual history and start worrying about climate change, the minimum wage and tax breaks for rich people like Trump himself.

While Hillary Clinton enjoys wide support in the Democratic presidential race across much of the country, in New Hampshire, Sen. Bernie Sanders still poses a threat. In Portsmouth Tuesday, Clinton spoke to a crowd that included voters weighing both candidates.

Sen. Bernie Sanders' quest to win the Democratic presidential nomination has come a long way since the Vermont senator formally entered the race in late May.

Allegra Boverman | Kate Harper

The fight late last week among Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee seems to have simmered down.

The DNC censured Sanders' campaign for improperly getting access to confidential voter data from Clinton's team. The restrictions have since been lifted, but the incident shone a light on a little known, but critical aspect of the 2016 presidential race: how candidates use data to identify, reach and influence potential supporters.

This post was updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign has filed a lawsuit against the Democratic National Committee to regain access to the committee's voter file. The DNC blocked the campaign from the resource Friday after a Sanders staffer accessed data collected and organized by Hillary Clinton's campaign.

The three Democratic presidential candidates will take the stage at Saint Anselm College Saturday night for their next debate.

This will be New Hampshire’s first debate of the primary season.

And while polls show a tight Democratic race here in the Granite State, the numbers nationally tell a different story.

NHPR/Sheryl Rich-Kern

Vermont Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is back in the Granite State this week. He spent part of Monday afternoon in Nashua, where he courted students.

Sanders stood behind the podium in a large classroom at Nashua Community College on Monday afternoon. He tailored his remarks for the setting and his audience – about 100 community college students.

Sanders talked about increasing funds for public education, from early childhood learning to college.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is kicking off a two-day campaign swing through the Granite State.

The Vermont Senator will meet with students at Nashua Community College Monday afternoon. That will be followed by a town hall meeting in Hollis at 5:30.

And Tuesday evening, Sanders will open a campaign office in Rochester, and is set to hold another town hall meeting in Hampton.

Republican candidates will be in Las Vegas early this week for the next GOP debate Tuesday.

There are many ways to describe Bernie Sanders: a democratic socialist, an independent senator, a Democratic presidential candidate. But the best adjective may just be: consistent. No matter how you label it, Sanders' worldview is locked in.

Over 40 years, Sanders has built his political career on a very focused message about what he calls a "rigged economy."

Sara Plourde/NHPR

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is waving off super PACS that want to help him.

In an email Monday to supporters, his campaign manager Jeff Weaver says Sanders has been surprised to learn about the pro-Sanders campaigns of outside groups that are allowed to raise unlimited amounts of money from donors. Sanders rails against such groups on the campaign trail, saying they contribute to a corrupt political system.

"They should spend their money somewhere else," Weaver writes in the email. "We do not want their help."

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Over a presidential campaign season that grows longer every four years, candidates have long counted on voters changing their minds before Primary Day. But we don’t often hear about how or why voters make up their minds in the first place. NHPR followed up with three voters to see how they are forming – and changing—their opinions over the course of the campaign.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Democratic presidential candidate and Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders sat down with Exchange host Laura Knoy and Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. 

flickr/barjack

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition most Monday mornings for "On The Political Front."

Bernie Sanders, the Vermont senator and Democratic presidential candidate, stopped by New Hampshire Public Radio's offices in Concord Friday morning for a conversation with The Exchange

On the way up, Sanders offered a quick "elevator pitch" for why he thinks he should be president — and took a moment to mingle with a (very) young potential constituent.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

In a forum with NHPR Friday afternoon, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders outlined a clear standard for who he'd nominate to the Supreme Court if elected. 

Sanders said before he'd tap any new justices to the bench, there is one test they'd have to pass. 

NHPR File Photo

Whether measured in polls, crowds or money raised, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton appear in a tight race as New Hampshire's Primary Day approaches.

Clinton, of course, is no stranger to hard-fought Granite State contests. She edged out Barack Obama in New Hampshire’s 2008 Democratic presidential primary, winning 39 percent of the vote to Obama’s 37 percent.   

But the bottom-line vote tallies can obscure a simple fact: The New Hampshire primary is not just a statewide contest. 

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

E-mail solicitations from political campaigns tend to follow a pretty well-worn formula:

AP Photo/Cheryl Senter

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition most Monday mornings for "On the Political Front."

Sanders Says He Opposes Kinder Morgan Pipeline

Nov 29, 2015

At Sunday night's Jefferson Jackson dinner, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders took a moment on the stage to express his opposition to the Northeast Energy Direct—the controversial natural gas pipeline proposed by Kinder Morgan.

"I opposed the Keystone Pipeline from day one," Sanders said. "And that is why, here in New Hampshire, I believe the Northeast Energy Direct pipeline, that would direct fracked natural gas for four hundred miles, through seventeen communities, is a bad idea, and should be opposed."

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Presidential candidates Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio will remain on the New Hampshire Presidential Primary ballot. That’s after the state Ballot Law Commission unanimously voted Tuesday to reject a handful of challenges to their qualifications to run for president. 

Kate Harper for NHPR

 

New Hampshire's largest public employee labor union is backing Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in the Democratic presidential primary, bucking its national affiliate's endorsement of Hillary Clinton.

The State Employees' Association/SEIU Local 1984 represents 11,500 workers across New Hampshire. President Richard Gulla says the chapter is backing Sanders because of his support for maintaining retirement benefits, lowering college costs, better wages for workers and his willingness to take on Wall Street.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bernie Sanders’ party affiliation on the New Hampshire primary ballot is  being officially challenged. Sanders, who serves in the U.S. Senate as an independent, filed for the presidential primary as a Democrat last week. But now a New York lawyer, who also filed for president, is putting Sanders' status into question. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bernie Sanders is officially a registered Democrat in the New Hampshire Presidential Primary. Despite some questions about the independent senator's party affiliation, Sanders passed a key hurdle Thursday to get on the New Hampshire ballot.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

For most presidential candidates, getting on the New Hampshire ballot is a fairly straightforward affair: Show up at the State House, bring $1,000 to cover the filing fee, and sign a form affirming  you’re registered with your chosen political party.

For Bernie Sanders, that last part has proven slightly more complicated.

This story comes from Vermont Public Radio and is an abridged version of its feature "Becoming Bernie: His Rise And His Record." You can view the full story here.

Bernie Sanders is an improbable politician. Independent, occasionally irascible, he came from the far left and an urban background to win elections in one of the most rural states in the country.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Sanders arrived at the William B. Cashin Senior Center in Manchester around noon Friday, having just flown in from Washington and a 3 a.m. Senate vote on the latest budget deal.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders says it's time the United States join nearly every industrialized nation in the West in saying no to capital punishment.

Sen. Sanders' remarks on the Senate floor Thursday came a day after rival Hillary Rodham Clinton voiced support for taking a "hard look" at the application of the death penalty, though she stopped short of advocating for abolishing the punishment.

Pages