Bernie Sanders

  • U.S. Senator since 2007. Former U.S. Rep. (1991-2007).
  • Elected as Independent from Vermont.
  • 2016 N.H. Democratic Presidential Primary winner.
  • Age: 78

New Hampshire Primary 2016: Recapping the Results

Feb 10, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Last night, the Granite State gave solid victories to Democrat Bernie Sanders and Republican Donald Trump, with John Kasich grabbing a coveted second place the GOP side.  We'll review the results, and what might be next as the candidates pack up their Granite State gear and head to contests elsewhere in the country.

Logan Shannon for NHPR

For Bernie Sanders, the New Hampshire Democratic primary was over before his after-party got started.

The gymnasium at Concord High School was not even half-full, and many supporters were still being wanded by the Secret Service when the news broke that, with with just 8 percent of precincts reporting, CNN had declared Sanders the winner.

The roar from the crowd as deafening.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders held his final campaign event before the primary at UNH last night, a concert intended to encourage students to vote, and featuring the group Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic zeros, among others.

Following a few hours of performances, the Sanders campaign bus finally rolled off the snowy roads from a campaign stop at Pinkerton Academy in Manchester.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

For months after announcing his White House bid, Bernie Sanders didn’t run a single campaign commercial on television. But he was everywhere online: emails, social media posts and paid ads on desktop computers and mobile devices.

Sanders has spent $10 million building a presence on the Internet, more than anyone else running for president this year. While the Vermont senator has hardly turned his back on TV, he’s betting that the voters most likely to embrace his vision for the country are online, not in front of a 50” flat-screen.

The two hottest candidates heading into the New Hampshire primary Tuesday are Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. On the face of it, the candidates and their messages couldn't be more different.

One is a billionaire businessman; the other, a career politician who rails against billionaires. But Sanders and Trump actually have more in common than you might think.

First, there are are the obvious similarities. They both have trademark hair and were raised in New York City. And then there's the way they say "huge":

Young voters in Iowa helped propel Sen. Bernie Sanders to a close second-place finish in the Democratic presidential race. He’ll be looking for similar results here in New Hampshire, but the trick for Sanders will be to translate youthful excitement into actual votes.

Primary season has officially begun. And as the presidential candidates campaign ahead of Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, both Republicans and Democrats are making big arguments in response to some big questions about their party's future.

Is there such a thing as an "establishment lane" that can win the GOP contest? Can a Democrat be both moderate and a progressive? Is it better to be pragmatic or idealistic?

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has said he is a different kind of candidate running a different kind of campaign. He doesn't have a SuperPAC and he doesn't want one. One of the things his supporters say they like about him is Sanders isn't a typical politician.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Jason Kirkwood, a machinist born and raised in Rochester, came to a Bernie Sanders campaign rally after work on Thursday.

While he’s has come across plenty of Clinton fans here in his hometown, “I think there’s a lot of Bernie supporters. I think it’s kind of divided,” he said, “I think there’s a lot of Hillary supporters but I personally don’t like her because I truly think she’s a pawn in the game to the corporate leaders.”

Jason Moon for NHPR

Last night, all eyes were on the Democratic presidential contenders as they sparred in their final debate before the New Hampshire Primary. Voters who turned out to see them, at the University of New Hampshire, ranged from firmly decided to not yet sure.

The fifth debate between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders was their first appearance as a duet, and that helped to highlight some of their harmony – even as it heightened their crescendos of dissonance.

With Martin O'Malley having suspended his campaign earlier in the week, the two remaining rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination met in New Hampshire on Thursday night — on stage together for nearly two hours.

"I happen to respect the secretary very much; I hope it's mutual," said Sanders.

And Clinton reciprocated:

AP Photo/David Goldman

Hillary Clinton says she hopes New Hampshire voters bring both their hearts and heads with them when they vote in the state primary Tuesday.

Clinton said in her closing statement in Thursday's debate that she doesn't want voters to choose between the candidate they support emotionally and the one they back intellectually.

Clinton says she will bring her heart to the presidency, but "we have to get our heads together" to solve problems facing the country.

Bernie Sanders ended the debate with an anti-establishment declaration.

Rubio's Stump Names a New Opponent: Bernie Sanders

Feb 4, 2016

GOP Presidential hopeful Marco Rubio’s pretty much stuck to the same stump speech for months— a focus on America’s God given rights, the threats posed by ISIS, and, a promise to repeal all of President Obama’s executive actions.

He makes the case that he’s the most electable Republican running, referencing Hillary Clinton through the whole speech.

But since Iowa, Rubio’s added one more character to his speech, a guy whose photo made it into the gallery up on the wall here in the large conference room here at St. Anselm: Bernie Sanders.

AP Photo/John Locher

New Hampshire voters will get one last chance to hear from the two Democratic presidential candidates Thursday night before heading to the polls for next week’s primary.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders will square off at a debate at the University of New Hampshire.

Boston Globe political reporter James Pindell joined NHPR's Morning Edition to talk about the Democratic race.

Kate Brindley for NHPR

At a CNN town hall forum in Derry Wednesday night, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton defended collecting $675,000 in fees for three speeches she made to Goldman Sachs.

Clinton says she made speeches to lots of groups and pushed back against the idea that the money she made would influence her.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

At campaign stops in Henniker and Hooksett on Wednesday, Texas Senator Ted Cruz riffed heavily on his ideas for reforming Washington, directing plenty of anger at the so-called political establishment.

And in this way, the Republican presidential candidate said he’s found some common ground with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, one of his Democratic rivals.

Jason Moon for NHPR

After a close finish in Iowa, both remaining Democratic presidential contenders - Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders - headed straight for the Granite State yesterday.

 

They each came claiming a victory.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

New Hampshire voters head to the polls next week with plenty to think about. And many of them have been thinking, comparing, contrasting, deciding, and un-deciding on candidates for a while now. NHPR has been following up with a handful of voters through the campaign to hear how their final decisions have been shaped by a long primary season. Today we hear from three of them.


AP/John Minchillo

In the final week of the New Hampshire presidential primary, NHPR is taking a closer listen to how some of the candidates are pitching themselves to the state's voters – through their standard stump speech. We've taken a few key moments in a recent speech and marked up the sound in each clip - just click listen to see them roll out. 

Here's an annotated recording of a recent speech by Democrat Bernie Sanders, delivered January 14, 2016 at Dartmouth's Spaulding Auditorium. (You can hear the full speech using the player at the bottom of this story.)

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign has a challenge ahead of it before Primary Day.

The Vermont senator gets some of his strongest support in New Hampshire from independents. But those same voters could, at the last minute, decide to cast a ballot in the Republican primary.

Bernie Sanders may be running an unconventional campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. But to close the sale with New Hampshire voters, he has put his money on a rather conventional means: television advertising.

NHPR file photos

With every day that passes leading up to the New Hampshire primary, the pressure builds on Republican presidential hopefuls looking to make a splash here.


Kate Brindley for NHPR

The UNH Survey Center turned plenty of heads this week with its latest poll on the New Hampshire Democratic primary. The poll, conducted for WMUR and CNN, had Bernie Sanders leaping even further ahead of Hillary Clinton, now leading 60 to 33 percent.

The poll did come with a few caveats. 

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joined Morning Edition to talk about Sunday night's Democratic debate and Republican Ted Cruz's big push here in New Hampshire.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

How do you define an attack ad? Is Hillary Clinton attacking Bernie Sanders, in her most recent ad? In it, she declares “It's time to pick a side, either we stand with the gun lobby, or we join the president and stand up to them.”

Kate Brindley for NHPR

 

Bernie Sanders casts himself as the voice of anti-establishment politics. But he's also a 25-year veteran of Congress.

Democratic rival Hillary Clinton is trying to draw attention to Sanders' record on gun control and health care. The strategy aims to point out the rare inconsistencies in his voting record that could clash with the anti-establishment brand he's cultivated during the presidential campaign.

 

Bernie Sanders has been outspending rival Hillary Clinton on ads just as the Democratic presidential race appears to be tightening and voters are tuning in.

In the past three weeks, Sanders' campaign has spent $4.7 million on ads to Clinton's $3.7 million. According to advertising tracker Kantar Media's CMAG, that means 1,000 more Sanders commercials than Clinton ads on broadcast TV.

The Sanders ad burst is coinciding with his rise in preference polls in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Jason Moon for NHPR

In the lobby of the Radisson hotel in downtown Manchester, high school and college students find themselves thrust into a microcosm of the New Hampshire primary. Several presidential campaigns from both parties are here, along with a slew of political professionals, advocacy groups, and other card-carrying political junkies. Stickers, buttons, and email lists are everywhere. There are even cardboard cut-outs of several presidential candidates spread throughout the room.

AP

While campaigning at New England College today, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke of student debt and other domestic policies. His proposals include providing health care for all Americans and free tuition at public colleges. But how will these be paid for? Sen. Sanders spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about this policy idea, and much more. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bernie Sanders generally passes up opportunities to take a dig at Democratic presidential rival Hillary Clinton. And he preaches the virtues of an issue-driven campaign. But Donald Trump clearly gets under his skin.

Sanders says time after time, the Republican front-runner "just comes up with things off the top of his head — that are lies."

And now the Vermont senator says Trump should stop talking about Bill Clinton's sexual history and start worrying about climate change, the minimum wage and tax breaks for rich people like Trump himself.

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