Ask Sam | New Hampshire Public Radio

Ask Sam

David Leins

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

David Lyons from Dearborn, Michigan, asks: “It’s spring time, and we can see the grass now and it’s even growing a little bit. And I’m wondering why I’m seeing these circles of growth — of greener grass than the rest of the field or the lawn? It looks really fertile, but it’s a circle. Why does this happen?”

Pixabay | jochemy

Each Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown answers a question from a listener about some quirk of the world around us. (Do you have a question for Sam? Submit it here!)  

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Fridays on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown joins the show to answer a burning question from a listener. Here's this week's edition: 

Sara Plourde

Chris Martin and Dave Anderson from Something Wild join Sam Evans-Brown for a special edition of Ask Sam

A version of this episode was originally published in 2017.

Flickr Creative Commons | Brian Scott

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Peter from Londonderry asks: Are there certain audio frequencies that birds can hear but humans can’t, in a similar way that dog whistles work?

Image by Jamie Johannsen from Pixabay

This time on the show it's another edition of Ask Sam, where Sam answers listener questions about the natural world. This time, questions about hugging trees, bumpy roads, objects stuck on power lines, and epic hummingbird battles.

Plus, from our semi-regular series 10X10, we head under the ice of a frozen lake. In this piece, we give the down low on bizarre properties of water, fish that thrive in a capped-off environment, and long beards of algae clinging to the underside of a secret ecosystem few have ever explored.

Flickr Creative Commons | Rod Haley

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Suzanne from Concord asks: “I’m trying to find out why ladybugs are in my house in the spring, and did they all live together in my house over the winter? And if they did that, what did they eat? Or do they eat? Do they hibernate? And now they’re dropping dead, I mean out of six ladybugs, there are two alive.”

Note: This eidition of Ask Sam originally aired in March of 2020.

Justine Paradis

In New England, the Waterman name is like mountain royalty. But beyond a tight circle of outdoors-people, they're not a household name. 

In February 2020, Sam Evans-Brown visited Laura Waterman, one of the most influential voices in American wilderness philosophy, for a conversation about writing, living off-grid, protecting Franconia Ridge, and how she's changed following the death of her husband.

Plus, another round of Ask Sam, in which the team discusses plant hair, shellfish, and birds-as-dinosaurs.

Flickr Creative Commons | Jill Rogan

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Christie in Franconia asks: In the forest the male deer leave this spot, they scratch it out and then they put their hoof mark there to say, ‘Girls, you know, here I am.’ But they have it all over the woods. Like there’s like 10 of them. How does the female deer, meet the male deer? How do they know to meet up?

Flickr Creative Commons | Bryce Bradford

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.” This edition of Ask Sam originally aired in January, 2020. 

 

Ruth from Sandwich asks: “I just was skating on beautiful Squam Lake with black ice, and we could look down and see some other stuff. I was wondering if you could talk about ice forms, why there’s cracks, why there’s little ridges, why there’s bubbles… all that stuff.”

gillianjc via Flickr Creative Commons

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam."

Flickr Creative Commons | Thirteen Of Clubs

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam."

Sheila from Greenfield Asks: "What makes a washboard? For decades I’ve driven over New Hampshire dirt roads, and jiggled and jostled all over the place and have never been able to suss out what makes a washboard."

Many people have theories about what causes a washboard, and many of those theories are wrong. 

Flickr Creative Commons | Matthew Prosser

 

 Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam."

 

Zach from Maryland asks: "I was riding my bike recently along the Anacostia River, and I noticed big pieces of wood through which the power lines were growing. How does this happen? How do power lines grow through pieces of trees - that are then presumably cut off so you just have these pieces of trees hanging there?

Flickr Creative Commons | liz west

Sam Evans-Brown is the host of NHPR's Outside/In podcast and radio show. Do you have a question for Sam? Call 1-844-GO-OTTER or email outsidein@nhpr.org.

Liz West, https://bit.ly/33Yig5a

 

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.” This time, producer Taylor Quimby stepped in to answer one. 

Donna from Campton asks: “Why can’t I get the same type of apple if I plant an apple seed? Are apples the only kinds of fruits like this or are their others?”

 

Photo by Jonathan Combe, https://bit.ly/2BhLrRu

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. This week, we're buzzing because...

...Patty from Northampton asks: "I should understand the tides but I really don't. So in North Hampton, we have a very small beach even at low tide. And I was recently at Ogunquit beach with a friend, and the tide goes the way the heck out at low tide. And I don't know why!"

Note: This edition of Ask Sam originally aired in October, 2019.

Wikimedia Commons

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Clair from Plymouth asks: “Why do cows have four teats and just about every other animal that doesn’t have litter has two?

Note: This edition of Ask Sam originally aired in February, 2020.

Susan Young / Flickr

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam."

Debbie Beauvair from Deerfield, N.H., asks: "I have a question about hummingbirds. We’ve noticed in the last 3 weeks or so that the number of hummingbirds have increased and the fights are off the charts. Our feeders are socially distanced by humminbird standards — at least 20 feet apart — but they’re swooping and chasing all over the place. What’s going on?"

Carbon Engineering

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam."

Flickr Creative Commons | Jan Kaláb

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

This week, he's tackling a gritty one from a listener named Laura from Stratham:

Sara Plourde

Are snow-making machines an example of climate adaptation, or an example of an emissions feedback loop? Does the fire risk posed by planting trees outweigh the benefits of their use as a carbon sink? Can the team talk big planet problems and still leave room for bad puns?

We’ll answer these questions and more climate queries on this special edition of Ask Sam.

https://flic.kr/p/5Dr6fa / Flicker CC

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Flickr Creative Commons | DaPuglet

  Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Sherry From Meredith asks: “I’m noticing a lot of chipmunks this year, as my son Josiah put it. Are we having a Chip-ocalypse? Like we had Squirrel-mageddon a couple of years ago?”

 

Wikimedia Commons

  Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In Host Sam Evans-Brown answers listeners' questions about the mysteries and quirks of the outside world.

Flickr Creative Commons | Nicholas A. Tonelli

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In Host Sam Evans-Brown answers listeners' questions about the mysteries and quirks of the outside world.

Laurie from California asks: “In all of the five big extinction events, how did plants fare versus animals? Are trees going to take over after we’re gone? Are trees with flowers still going to be around?”

Flickr Creative Commons | Brian Gratwicke

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Susanne from Rumney asks: "I’ve been going for a walk every morning since we’ve been quarantined. So, I’ve noticed lately that I’ve heard a lot of woodpeckers in the morning and I haven’t noticed them before. And I wondered if there are more of them or if this is the time of year that they are seeking wood from the trees?"

 

Flickr Creative Commons | USFWS Mountain-Prairie

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Cindy from Chichester asks: "Every year I have a skunk that comes around and makes divots all over my yard looking for grubs. The question is this: Do they actually know that there is a grub in the place that they dig, or do they just randomly dig holes until they find something? I have not been able to get an answer to this question, so it’s your turn." 

Challenge accepted, Cindy.

Wikimedia Commons

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Claudia Asks: “What is the difference between a turtle and a tortoise? Which do we have in New Hampshire? Could you give some examples of each please?”

This is one of the classic turtle questions, and as such we’re going to knock it out of the park quickly and pivot to some #turtlefacts.

Flickr Creative Commons | C Watts

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Sara in New Orleans asks: “I’m calling because every time I think I’m very good at recognizing shore birds, I get mixed up by the fact that some of their bills change color during the different seasons, and I’m just so confused by how this happens and how long it takes for it to happen.”

Flickr Creative Commons | William A. LaCrosse III

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Gary from Randolph asks: "I was curious as to whether Lyme disease affects wildlife. Do fox, moose, bear and other critters suffer from Lyme disease?"

You may have heard that dogs can get Lyme disease. You may have also heard that cats don’t. What gives? 

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