Aquaculture

Oyster farming is growing in New Hampshire’s “hidden coast,"  the Great Bay.  It’s one of just a few foods that you can put on your plate that can actively make the environment cleaner as it grows.  We check in on the effort to use bivalves to restore the Great Bay, and on the businesses that are bringing N.H. oysters to market.  Hosted by  Sam Evans-Brown of Outside/In.

Air Date: Monday, December 2, 2019

The Future of Food? Aquaculture & Aquaponics

Nov 20, 2018

We learn about new ways of growing our food. There's aquaculture; growing fish and crops in coastal waters and the open ocean.  At the mouth of the Piscataqua River, a UNH-led team has designed a raft that serves as a pen for steelhead trout, with mussels and sea kelp that benefit from the fish.  Then there's aquaponics - using the wastewater from farming fish to provide nutrients for plants grown without soil. And then, we hear Peter Biello's interview with Joshua Johnson of 1A when he visited New Hampshire last month. 

minwoo / Flickr CC

Two new Oyster Farms could sprout up in Little Bay next year. If approved, it would make ten farms in operation in the estuary.

The max size for an oyster farm in New Hampshire is four acres, but the two proposed farms are both considerably smaller. One, from a UNH Masters student would be 2.5 acres, and the other would be just an acre in size.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Oyster farming in the Great Bay Estuary is in the midst of a little bit of a boom. In recent years, the number of oyster farms has leapt from 1 to 8, with more on the way. These gains are boosting the hopes that using these filter feeders as an “outside-the-pipes” way to clean up the waters of the Great Bay could become a reality.