Andrew Yang

Annie Ropeik | NHPR

Presidential candidate Andrew Yang ended his campaign for the White House Tuesday night, soon after polls closed in New Hampshire.

To a cheering crowd in Manchester, Yang said he wouldn't keep taking donations for a race he couldn't win - but that his message on economic change has shaken up the race.

"This is the beginning - this movement is the future of American politics, this movement is the future of the Democratic party," he said.

Updated at 8:26 p.m. ET

Andrew Yang, a tech entrepreneur who built his campaign around a signature policy proposal — universal basic income — has ended his bid for the presidency.

"We have touched and improved millions of lives and moved this country we love so much in the right direction. And while there is great work left to be done, you know, I am the math guy, and it is clear tonight from the numbers that we are not going to win this race," he told supporters on Tuesday night.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

It's the final stretch before the first primary ballots will be cast in New Hampshire, and candidates are crisscrossing the state to make their final case to voters here. Bookmark this page for updates on what the candidates are up to in these final days, what Granite State voters are saying, and more.

Click here for Part 2 of our Primary Countdown Blog.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

When it comes to abortion rights support, there is little daylight between the Democrats running for president. That much became clear quickly at the ‘Our Rights, Our Courts’ forum in Concord Saturday sponsored by several abortion-rights groups including the Center for Reproductive Rights.

You can’t outscroll them.

Political ads are bombarding social media in New Hampshire right now, as presidential candidates try to squeeze in as much digital facetime as they can in the lead up to Tuesday’s primary.

  

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Voters heard new specifics and a sense of urgency around climate change from several Democratic candidates at a youth-focused forum in Concord Wednesday.

Former South Bend mayor Pete Buttigieg, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, businessman Andrew Yang were among the candidates present; others were represented by surrogates. 

With national media and top climate activists watching, they laid out their plans to tackle global warming and related equity issues, and took questions from students involved in sustainability fields and climate science.  

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

In their effort to woo voters before next month’s primary, Democratic Presidential candidates have come out with an array of policy plans, including ones to revitalize the rural United States. NHPR’s Sarah Gibson has been looking at what these plans might mean for rural New Hampshire and talking to voters about their concerns.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

How would an extra $12,000 a year change your lifestyle? Your life? The centerpiece of Andrew Yang’s presidential campaign is something he dubs the Freedom Dividend: a payment of $1,000, every month, to every adult in America. 

During the final presidential debate of 2019, one of the moderators posed a question about a topic that rarely gets attention on the debate stage: What steps would candidates take to help disabled people get more integrated into the workforce and their local communities?

For Andrew Yang, the question was both political and personal. His oldest son, Christopher, is on the autism spectrum.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

Presidential candidate Andrew Yang told an audience of teenagers in Concord today that he wants to lower the voting age in America to 16. He argues it would help promote civic engagement among younger people.

Speaking inside a nearly full auditorium at Concord High School, the former tech entrepreneur said that while some teenagers may not seem well-informed, there are plenty of voting-age adults who also fall into that category.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Throughout the presidential primary campaign, voters in New Hampshire have said climate change is one of their top priorities. And even as candidates emphasize the dangers of global warming – and detail their plans to address it – many voters aren't reassured.

NHPR’s Annie Ropeik has more as part of our series “Where They Stand,” which takes a closer look at candidates’ policy proposals. 

Editor's note, Feb. 4, 2020: Click here to see an updated version of this project with the Democratic field as of the final week of the New Hampshire primary. 

Andrew Yang, the Democratic presidential hopeful who wants to give every American a $1,000 check each month, was interviewed for an hour Nov. 7 on The Exchange 2020 Candidate Forum, a series produced in collaboration between NHPR and New Hampshire PBS.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

Drug recovery centers first became a stop on the campaign trail in the 2016 New Hampshire primary, and they’re playing an especially important role this year, as presidential hopefuls unveil their plans to tackle the opioid crisis.

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

Presidential candidate Andrew Yang tried to set his climate change plan apart from the rest of the Democratic field at an event in Portsmouth on Monday. Yang had been criticized recently for saying on the Democratic debate stage that the solution to climate change is to "move to high ground."

On the banks of the Piscataqua River Monday, the venture capitalist said that stance is about accepting some harsh scientific truths.

Ali Oshinskie for NHPR

Andrew Yang, who may be best known for his "Freedom Dividend," describes himself as an entrepreneur, an optimist, and an "Asian man who likes math" — that last one being a standard campaign quip.

The Democratic presidential hopeful outlined his ideas in an interview with the NPR Politics Podcast and New Hampshire Public Radio. 

Ali Oshinskie/NHPR

Andrew Yang could give his platform on Universal Basic Income in his sleep: he’s been widely covered on the impacts of automation and technology on the American workforce and how he plans to solve those issues through a “Freedom Dividend” and value-added tax. But on key social issues like gun-control and abortion, Yang hasn’t had as much air time.

NHPR Host Peter Biello asked Yang on The Exchange about his signature platforms and less popular policies for the tech entrepreneur running his first campaign for public office. Read selected excerpts from the interview below; they have been edited for clarity.

[Listen to the full conversation here.] 

2020 Candidate Conversation: Andrew Yang

May 9, 2019
Ali Oshinskie

 

  

Andrew Yang is running for President on $1,000 a month: his central campaign policy is the concept of Universal Basic Income, which he is calling a “Freedom Dividend,” a monthly stipend from the federal government for each American, ages 18 to 64.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

The Exchange is interviewing Andrew Yang on Friday, May 10 at 9 a.m. He is an entreprenuer who is running for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2020. Check out Rick Ganley's interview with him for Morning Edition here.  Submit your questions for Yang below. 

Robert Garrova for NHPR

Presidential candidates have already been spending a lot of time in New Hampshire. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley has been sitting down with them to chat about where they stand on the issues facing Granite Staters.

Andrew Yang is a 44-year-old entrepreneur who is running for the Democratic presidential nomination. Rick spoke with Yang after a campaign event in Concord:

(Below is a transcript from the NHPR interview.)

Robert Garrova for NHPR

Longshot 2020 presidential hopeful Andrew Yang thinks all Americans 18 and over need a raise, so much so that he’s basing his entire campaign on Universal Basic Income, or the idea that the government should provide a set amount of money to help cover the basics.

This year, Yang is testing his so-called Freedom Dividend with the Fassi family in Goffstown, New Hampshire, who will receive $1,000 a month for a year.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

New York entrepreneur and 2020 presidential long shot Andrew Yang visited New Hampshire Wednesday to make stops at the True Brew Barista coffee shop in Concord and N.H. Democratic Party headquarters.

 

Yang is going all in on "Universal Basic Income" for his campaign. He says all Americans age 18-64 should get $1,000 a month from the government in order to stem the wealth gap and the effects of job loss from automation.