alternative energy

Cori Princell for NHPR

 

 

 Next week, when lawmakers are expected to vote on whether to override Governor Sununu’s vetoes of dozens of bills, Forest Society President Jane Difley will be rooting for HB 183. 

 “This would help support the six biomass plants in New Hampshire for a period of time,” says Difley,  who is retiring in October after 23 years leading the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.  

 

 

(Difley recently joined The Exchange to discuss her tenure at the Society. You can hear the full conversation here.)

 

What's Next for Renewable Energy Projects in N.H.?

Aug 7, 2019
Amy Quinton for NHPR

The recent defeat of Northern Pass was a major setback for the import of large-scale hydropower into the region.  Meanwhile, efforts to build more solar and wind power are still underway… and some towns and cities have set their own renewable goals. We'll look at the reliability of these technologies… and  talk about their role in the future of our region’s power grid. 

UNH/Gonghu Li

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found a new way to make sustainable fuel out of sunlight.

The process is an artificial form of photosynthesis – where plants use sunlight to convert carbon dioxide into energy.

Here, researchers combined cobalt and urea – both cheap and abundant – to make a yellow material that absorbs sunlight.

That lets the material reduce carbon dioxide from the air into component parts that can be stored as a combustible liquid fuel.