Adoption

It’s the last show of the year and thus a time to look back on where we’ve been and the stories we’ve shared. Word of Mouth producers celebrate the work they loved and the stories that stuck with them from producers and reporters around NHPR.

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Transracial adoption, or adoption outside of one's own race or ethnic group, has continued to grow in the U.S. in the last fifity years. We talk with adoptees and a social worker about the adoptee experience, including living and growing up in a new culture, in a family of a different race, sometimes the other side of the world from their birthplace, and how families can engage in meaninful conversations about identity, culture, and race. 


You're Family Now

Nov 23, 2018

In June 1981, a bodybuilder, a stockbroker, and 10 other men entered the woods of New Hampshire to settle an argument. They called it "The First Annual Survival Game," and the details are the stuff of legend... even if they aren't all true. Then, what happens to your leaves after you rake them up and put them on the curb? And another story in our continuing series on vanity plates, this one a story far more complex than a license plate can capture.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court on Tuesday expanded the circumstances under which someone over age 18 can be adopted while still maintaining a legal relationship with a biological parent.

The case involved an unmarried man seeking to adopt a woman. A lower court ruled against him, saying it would only approve the adoption if the woman terminated her legal relationship with her mother and the man adopted her "as a single parent who will be the only parent after adoption."

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International adoption peaked in 2004: That year, Americans brought 23,000 children from foreign countries into their families. But in the decade since, there's been a remarkable decline. Last year, 5000 kids from other nations were adopted, which is a slide of 70 percent. Theories abound on why this sudden, dramatic drop-off occurred, but researchers say one thing is clear: Many Americans still want to adopt internationally, and they're frustrated that it's become far more difficult. 


loveiswritten via Flickr Creative Commons

State officials say New Hampshire faces a critical shortage of foster families for a growing number of children.

About 1,000 kids will enter the public system this year, yet there are only 600 licensed foster homes, and many of those are not prepared to take in a child at this time.

Michelle Galligan with Child and Family Services in Manchester says the state is particularly struggling to find homes for sibling groups, sometimes with up to four children at a time. And the problem has gotten worse in recent years.

L: Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum|Public domain

This week marks the 40th anniversary of the Fall of Saigon, and “Operation Babylift” which evacuated thousands of supposedly orphaned South Vietnamese children who were then relocated to homes in American and beyond. On today’s show we’ll revisit the controversial program and get a firsthand account from one of the airlifted children.

S P Photography / Flickr/CC

More children these days are living with Grandma and Grandpa, due to factors including incarceration, drug abuse, underemployment, and single parenthood.  We’ll find out how these grandparents become primary caregivers of their grandchildren, and the challenges they face, including housing, health, financial and legal issues.

GUESTS:

Returning Adopted Children

Sep 23, 2013
Anthony Kelly via flickr Creative Commons

Adopting a child is for many people the culmination of a dream. But it takes work, and money – international adoptions can run from $15,000 to $40,000, and involve years of vetting and paperwork. Still, things don’t always work out.  A network of internet groups has become an underground market for advertising and discarding unwanted children – most of them adopted from abroad.  The process is called “private re-homing,” and it involves little or no government oversight. It’s the topic of an 18-month investigation by Reuters. Megan Twohey is investigative reporter at Thomson Reuters, and among those who worked on the 5-part series and multimedia presentation called, “The Child Exchange.”

Concord Monitor Reporter Clay Wirestone has been writing about his experience as a gay parent. He’s authored a series of articles about the process he and his husband have gone through in adopting their 2 year old son. The series has also looked at the history of gay adoption in the Granite State. Clay joins us to talk about the series.