Morning Edition | New Hampshire Public Radio

Morning Edition

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Adrian is now on the line with us from Minneapolis. Adrian, there has been so much anticipation and so much anxiety about the start of this trial. What is the mood today in Minneapolis?

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

The pandemic has devastated the art sector, and hundreds of small museums are trying to keep from having to close forever. Here's NPR's Nina Kravinsky.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Singer John Mayer has been teasing new music on TikTok.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

JOHN MAYER: (Singing) And if you want to use me...

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It takes a long time and a lot of work to barbecue a whole hog over a wood fire. Rodney Scott knows because he's cooked them for years. And he remembers falling in love with the work when he started listening to music.

Copyright 2021 Delaware Public Media. To see more, visit Delaware Public Media.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

The Library of Congress is preserving the sound of American history. It's added 25 new entries to its national recording registry. Here's the librarian of Congress, Carla Hayden.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Today begins the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

As President Biden called on senators to quickly pass legislation to tighten the nation's background checks system, he said that he did not need to "wait another minute" to address the epidemic of gun violence.

Copyright 2021 WBHM 90.3 FM. To see more, visit WBHM 90.3 FM.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Phil Brown

For some, maple sugaring is a perennial ritual, painstakingly completed as we usher out the bitter wisps of winter, and embrace balmier, brighter days of early spring.

And whether you’re producing maple syrup with just a few buckets, or if you’ve expanded operations with a full-blown sugar shack … you know this much to be true:

 

1) Sugaring is an art

2) Sugaring is a science

3) And a great excuse to be outdoors, with family and friends.

 

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Chicago, there's a big fight over plans to build a metal recycling facility. The controversy has drawn together environmental justice advocates across the country. Linda Lutton of member station WBEZ has more.

Updated March 26, 2021 at 11:29 AM ET

Updated at 11:29 a.m.

George Holland, the mayor of Moorhead, Miss., remembers the feeling when he heard that Regions Bank was closing its branch in his small, rural town a few years ago.

"That was actually the only bank in our community and the next-closest bank was probably 8, 9 miles to Indianola," Holland said. "I was thinking, 'What are we going to do?' "

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Republicans in key states across this country are focused on changing access to voting, and the party in Georgia is leading the way.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Georgia voters will have to follow new election rules. State Republicans there passed a sweeping elections bill that limits mail-in voting and changes absentee and early voting. Governor Brian Kemp signed the legislation into law last night.

Picture this: It's sometime in the early 1990s, in rural Oklahoma. There's a little Baptist church – it's Sunday, and inside of the church everyone is wearing their nicest clothes. They listen to the sermon, until the pastor calls a kid — a little girl — up to the front, to lead everyone in a song: "Amazing Grace."

These are the memories that country music superstar Carrie Underwood pulls from for her new album, My Savior. It's her first release comprised solely of Christian songs, based on the hymnals she'd sing along to in her youth.

Although sisters Carmencristina Moreno and Rosemary Selzer were born 14 years apart, they both have vivid memories of growing up surrounded by music.

Their parents were Mexican folk music stars, known as Los Moreno, in Los Angeles between the 1930s and '50s.

The sisters, Carmencristina, now 81, and Rosemary, 67, came to StoryCorps to remember their late father, Luis M. Moreno, and the bittersweet legacy he left behind.

LAS PALMAS DE GRAN CANARIA, Spain — In a sunlit courtyard, volunteers at a church soup kitchen are handing out lunch bags and cups of fruit juice.

Arcadina Dámaso, the coordinator, says demand has shot up.

"Until December, a maximum of 50 people would come here," she says. "Now, we're serving 75. Most of the new ones are Senegalese and Moroccan."

ICU nurse gets a vaccine shot
Jordyn Haime / NHPR

New Hampshire continues its efforts to deliver COVID-19 vaccines to residents. Residents 50 and older became eligible for shots just this week. But the virus continues to spread across the state.

NHPR's Health and Equity reporter Alli Fam has been tracking the latest numbers. She spoke with Morning Edition host Rick Ganley about where things stand for the state.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Pages