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Morning Edition

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

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On the final Sunday of his life, Martin Luther King Jr. took up an invitation. On that Sunday, in 1968, he stepped into the pulpit of the National Cathedral here in Washington and delivered a sermon.

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Marvel has a new series of shows for Disney+. New actually is kind of a stretch. It is remixing and reimagining classic sitcoms. Here's NPR TV critic Eric Deggans.

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Drive toward the White House on 16th Street NW here in Washington, and you are stopped several blocks away by a high metal fence.

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When Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have A Dream" speech 58 years ago, he changed the course of history with his aspiration.

The metaphors, political overtones and themes King employed were inspired by Langston Hughes' poem "I Dream A World:"

I dream a world where man

No other man will scorn,

Where love will bless the earth

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Gov. Chris Sununu is starting his third term as governor of New Hampshire. Morning Edition host Rick Ganley spoke with Sununu Friday about the challenges facing the state, events this past week in Washington, and what he hopes to accomplish in the next two years.

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Well, last Wednesday, just before pro-Trump extremists stormed the Capitol in an insurrection that left five people dead, the president insisted...

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President-elect Joe Biden has identified his first priority. He's calling for $1.9 trillion in new spending to help the U.S. economy navigate its way out of the pandemic.

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This weekend, you can see actor Wendell Pierce star in a new production that is streaming for free online. "The thing I love about the play is: not often do you see Black men just love each other and work through the difficulties of that love," Pierce says.

Clara Jean Ester was a college student at Memphis State College in Tennessee when she bore witness to a series of pivotal moments in civil rights history.

As a junior, Ester joined the Memphis Sanitation Strike in 1968, alongside African American sanitation workers who were calling to demand better working conditions and higher wages.

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President Trump is once again making history with less than a week left in his term. Last night, he became the first American president to be impeached twice. This time, the charge is inciting an insurrection.

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As COVID-19 deaths and illnesses mount, essential workers — who are denied the chance to work from home — are struggling to stay safe. And it's far from clear whether the federal government is doing enough to protect them, according to a former top federal workplace safety official.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration official, Deborah Berkowitz, said the Trump administration has neglected COVID-19 safety at meatpacking plants and many other workplaces.

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