The Exchange

Live Monday - Thursday at 9 am, rebroadcast Mon - Thu at 7 pm, Sunday at 6 am

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show, hosted by Laura Knoy.  It airs live at 9 AM and is rebroadcast at 7 PM weekdays.

Have an idea for a show topic? Click here to submit it.

This year, The Exchange is continuing our In Depth series by looking workforce challenges in NH. Click here for the series page to listen to the programs you might have missed.

We also had a four-part series on K-12 education, airing on Mondays in August of 2019. Click here to see that coverage. 

Coming up on The Exchange: 

  • Monday, 1/20: Rebroadcast: Senator Bernie Sanders Candidate Conversation
  • Tuesday, 1/21:  Tape: Stranglehold
  • Wednesday, 1/22:  How Medicare Works
  • Thursday, 1/23:  Solar Energy
  • Friday, 1/24:  Weekly N.H. News Roundup: First In The Nation Primary Edition

You can reach the show by email to exchange@nhpr.org, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page. You can also call in during the live show at 800-892-6477.

Want more of The Exchange? We have a podcast! 

If you can't listen to the live show or don't live in our broadcast area, you can listen to our show online (just open the day's show post below) or subscribe to our podcast. 

Here's a handy video we made to help show you how to subscribe:

Click here to get it on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher. (Don't know how to find and listen to podcasts? Click here for a handy guide created by our friends at VPR!)

Coffee & Community 

Host Laura Knoy and the show's producers will be hitting the road to hear about what's happening in your community and what topics you think we should be covering. We'll be taking notes and using your input to help make decisions about upcoming Exchange shows!

There are currently no upcoming events. Check back later for updates. 

 

In her new book, Sharenthood, UNH Law Professor Leah A. Plunkett takes on the digital age of parenting and the excessive sharing of children's images and data online. Plunkett urges adults to think before they click, to understand the risks of sharing chldren's digital information and what some protective measures might be. 

On September 11th, we look at health care for veterans. It's been two years since whistleblowers at the Manchester VA alleged poor care and oversight, part of a string of similar cases nationally.  We ask where the veterans health care system is at today, what changes have occurred, and the role of politics in veteran healthcare. 

Karla Cinquanta

Jane Difley, the first female president of the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, is retiring on October 1, 2019, after 22 years. As a licensed forester, she has seen forest management evolve since she was a Forest Society intern in the 1970s. Her conservation leadership of the state's scenic landscapes includes establishing and getting dedicated funding for L-CHIP, as well as playing a role in the protection of the Connecticut Lakes Headwaters, the Balsams, and Mount Major. The Forest Society was also a leader in the fight against the Northern Pass transmission pipeline.

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According to James Silver, a local professor who extensively researched the topic of active shooters with the FBI in a 2018 study, there are commonalities among these perpetrators and many warning signs before an act of violence occurs. Silver offers a solution he says could help bridge the divide on this issue.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Congressman Chris Pappas spoke with The Exchange on a variety of issues including climate change legislation, background checks, and the I-93 expansion.  Here are some highlights from that conversation. 

Listen to the show and read the transcript. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 6, 2019

Sep 5, 2019

Students are back at school and we focus on education issues. The N.H. Supreme Court is asked once again to weigh in on school funding. In Concord, the school board considers a petition to remove two administrators for how they handled allegations of sexual assault and inappropriate behavior by former teacher, Howie Leung.  We find out why the Manchester Police Department says it is losing confidence in Hillsborough County Attorney Michael Conlon.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

We ask the Democrat repesenting New Hampshire's first Congressional district about his work on Capitol Hill and what he's been hearing from Granite Staters while touring the state this summer. We also get his take on some recent news, including last night's town-hall discussions on climate change with Democratic presidential candidates, local disputes over opioid policy, and the immigration debate.

This show will air live at 9 a.m. on Thursday, September 5th, and again at 7 p.m. The audio and transcript will be available shortly after the conclusion of the program. 

PX Here

Americans receive billions of robocalls. Some are legitimate, many are scams. Now state and federal officials, as well as telecommunications companies, are all pledging to collaborate against fraudulent calls.  We examine these efforts and how effective they might be. 

How Can N.H. Encourage More Bikers and Walkers?

Sep 3, 2019
NHDOT

The N.H. Department of Transportation is tackling a plan for the next decade to improve how we get around in the state, on foot and by bike.  We look at the state planning process, and how walkers and bikers can weigh in on problem areas. We also discuss how different kinds of cyclists and pedestrians (including children) impact state and regional planning, and how streets are rated for traffic stress.  NHPR's Sam Evans-Brown, host of Outside/In, is guest host.

GUESTS:

What Are Your Questions For U.S. Rep. Chris Pappas?

Sep 3, 2019
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The Exchange will be talking with U.S. Rep. Chris Pappas on Thursday, Sept. 5. Submit your questions below for the first-term congressman. Pappas, a Democrat, represents New Hampshire's 1st District and serves on the Veterans' Affairs and Transportation and Infrastructure Committees. 

PX Here

Five generations, one workplace: That's the unprecedented scenario now at some companies: Millennials (also known as Geneartion Y), Baby Boomers, Traditionalists, Generations X and Z working together. But while certain values and descriptions are often attached to these groups, to what extent are these labels true?  And how is everybody getting along at work?

This program originally aired in July, 2019. 

No signs yet of real progress on the stalled state budget -- and recent revenue extimates predicting business taxes will fall short of expectations may have deepened the divide between Democrats and Gov. Sununu, who vetoed the budget in June.   

State officials announce that New Hampshire's Division of Motor Vehicles had accumulated thousands of DMV infractions, recently catching up on that backlog and suspending the licenses of more than 900 residents.  

And the stage is set for the next Democratic debate, with just about half the candidates meeting the requirements to participate.  Among those who made the cut are three candidates who visited N.H. recently: Entrepreneur Andrew Yang, U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, and former V.P. Joe Biden.  

We conclude our "Exploring Education" series with the N.H. Department of Education's Learn Everywhere program.  This initiative would allow the state school board to approve credits for students' outside experiences, from internships to dance classes.  Supporters say the goal is wider academic and economic opportunity, but many teachers and local administrators are opposed. 

This show originally aired on August 19th, 2019. 

PX Here

We examine how teachers themselves are educated, including how aspiring teachers are certified. We'll also explore how teacher training programs have changed to meet the needs and ambitions of today's students, and why many educators say professional development over the course of their careers is often not useful.

This show originally aired on August 12, 2019. 

What distinguishes a learning disability, and what accomodations are available? How do schools, teachers, and students approach learning disabilities, and how have philosophies and strategies changed? What are the challenges students and their educators and parents continue to face?

This show originally aired on August 5, 2019. 

In the first part of our 4-part series on K-12 education, we look at what role schools should play in helping students learn life skills for money management. Several states require financial literacy classes for high school students, and Senator Hassan has co-sponsored federal legislation to support financial literacy classes in schools. We look at the role of schools in helping students learn to manage money: what skills do students need, and what are N.H. schools doing? 

This show previously aired on July 29th, 2019. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 23, 2019

Aug 22, 2019

We focus on environmental news on this edition of the Weekly New Hampshire News Roundup. We talk about climate issues on the 2020 campaign trail after the departure of Jay Inslee, and compare the climate plans offered by other Democratic candidates. Following protests at the statehouse over the Merrimack Station coal plant, we discuss the future of fossil fuel generators in the state. Plus, the latest environmental vetoes and bill signings from Governor Chris Sununu.  Annie Ropeik, NHPR's environment and energy reporter, is guest host.

GUESTS:

On the N.H. Economic News Roundup, we discuss the indicators that are raising warnings of a recession, from proposed tax cuts by President Trump, to continued tensions with China and other countries over tariffs, to swings in the stock market. How is all of this impacting New Hampshire, and what might it mean in the future? 

This program will air live at 9 a.m. on Thursday, August 21, and again at 7 p.m. Audio and transcript of the discussion will be available after the conclusion of the show. 

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Federal health officials are tracking clusters of serious health issues among mostly young people.  Analysts have linked these lung conditions and breathing problems with vaping.

But some health officials suspect certain unlicensed vaping substances that included contaminated liquids. The Exchange on Wednesday gets the latest on what we know and what we don't about vaping.  As of Tuesday, Aug. 20, N.H. health officials said they were not aware of any cases in the Granite State but they are monitoring the situation.


Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Congresswoman Ann McLane Kuster is cosponsoring legislation to reduce border zones from 100 to 25 miles from the border, within which U.S. Customs and Border Patrol can set up immigration checkpoints.

Exploring Education: 'Learn Everywhere' in N.H.

Aug 19, 2019
NHPR

We conclude our "Exploring Education" series with the N.H. Department of Education's Learn Everywhere program.  This initiative would allow the state school board to approve credits for students' outside experiences, from internships to dance classes.  Supporters say the goal is wider academic and economic opportunity, but many teachers and local administrators are opposed. 

GUESTS:

  • Frank Edelblut -  Commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Education since February 2017. Edelblut formerly served as a Republican member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives. 
  • Sarah Gibson - NHPR Education Reporter.
  • Dr.  Carl Ladd - Executive Director, New Hampshire School Administrators Association, a former superintendent and teacher in grades 6 through 12.  He has also served as a school board member.

READ the DOE primer on its Learn Everywhere program.

NHPR's Sarah Gibson reported on educators' concerns about the Learn Everywhere program.

Congresswoman Kuster On Guns & Medicare For All

Aug 17, 2019
Dan Tuohy / NHPR

U.S. Rep. Ann McLane Kuster joins The Exchange to discuss legislation and policies she's been working on in Washington, D.C., as well as recent state and national news. She serves on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. 

This conversation airs live at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, August 20th, and again at 7 p.m. Audio and transcript of the discussion will be available shortly after the conclusion of the program. 

As schools in New Hampshire prepare for a new law requiring suicide prevention policies, questions about how districts will implement these policies remain.

The law also requires school districts to include annual training on suicide recognition and prevention for all school staff.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 16, 2019

Aug 15, 2019

President Trump returns to New Hampshire, and we hear about his rally in Manchester as well as some national perspective on the 2020 Presidential Primary from NPR White House Correspondent Tamara Keith. With the Iowa State Fair wrapping up, a parade of Democratic candidates are coming back through the state and we catch up on the Democratic primary here. We also discuss whether Claremont is the new Dixville Notch; a bellwether for primary watchers.  NHPR Reporter Casey McDermott is guest host.

GUESTS:

The Role of Schools In Suicide Prevention

Aug 14, 2019

A new law requires schools in New Hampshire impliment suicide prevention policies, which include prevention training for school staff.   The measure comes amid concern about New Hampshire's high youth suicide rate.  We find out how schools are preparing, and what some are already doing, and discuss the value this training brings to school staff and students. 

If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text 741741. Find more information for teens and young adults about warning signs and what to do. 

Rebroadcast: Author And Naturalist Sy Montgomery

Aug 13, 2019

Sy Montgomery, author of 28 books, including the recent How to Be a Good Creature: A Memoir in Thirteen Animals, and The Magnificent Migration: On Safari with Africa's Last Great Herds, talks about her work, her life, and the importance of learning from animals. 

Montgomery recently appeared at the New England Aquarium to talk about How to Be a Good Creature. You can watch a video of that talk here

This show previously aired on July 23, 2019. 

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Veteran  and novice teachers agree: Anyone considering a career in teaching should start working as early as possible with students – either as student teachers or as tutors – to see if it’s a good fit.  One may love and excel at math but not necessarily know how to best teach it. Today's teachers are also expected to deal with challenges unrelated to the subjects they teach. 

Hate rhetoric online has been linked to several recent incidents of mass violence in the United States and internationally. But even when this kind of speech doesn't lead to physical harm, it is damanging to the targeted group and the wider community. We look at how hateful language has impacted people over time, and what our legal system says. 

PX Here

We examine how teachers themselves are educated, including how aspiring teachers are certified. We'll also explore how teacher training programs have changed to meet the needs and ambitions of today's students, and why many educators say professional development over the course of their careers is often not useful.

Flickr

 

The state park system is thriving, with a 30% increase in visitors since 2013, according to Philip Bryce, director of the N.H. Division of Parks and Recreation, which includes 93 sites. 

“It's nice because our mission is to get people outdoors, enjoying the outdoors, because it’s good for your health; it's good for your frame of mind, and it's wonderful to see that,” Bryce said on The Exchange.  (For the full conversation, listen here.)

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