The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show, hosted by Laura Knoy.  It airs live at 9 AM and is rebroadcast at 7 PM weekdays.

Have an idea for a show topic? Click here to submit it.

The Exchange is working on a series for spring 2019 on workforce shortages in New Hampshire. Click here to learn more and submit your questions/stories.

Coming Up on The Exchange: 

  • Monday, 4/22: Laid-back Hiking
  • Tuesday, 4/23: PTSD and First Responders
  • Wednesday, 4/24:  Offshore Wind
  • Thursday, 4/25:  Community College Education 
  • Friday, 4/26:  Weekly N.H. News Roundup

Want to call in during the show or leave us a message? Here's the number: 800.892.6477 

You can also reach the show by email to exchange@nhpr.org, by tagging us in a tweetfollowing us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

If you can't listen to the live show or don't live in our broadcast area, you can listen to our show online (just open the day's show post below) or subscribe to our podcast. Click here to get it on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher. (Don't know how to find and listen to podcasts? Click here for a handy guide created by our friends at VPR!)

Community College System of New Hampshire

While many still see commuity colleges as technical and vocational training schools, on these campuses in New Hamphsire, there's a robust conversation now about the broader value of that two-year degree -- and what courses it should include, to develop not just skilled workers but well-rounded citizens.

The Future Of Offshore Wind In New Hampshire

Apr 24, 2019
Ashley Dace

This year has featured bipartisan discussion around offshore wind development in the Granite State. Why now? And what effect could this have on our state's economy, environment, and energy landscape?

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Dr . Robert Feder says he spends about a quarter of his time on the phone with insurance companies trying to get care approved for his patients.

These requests are often denied, he says, and criteria for "medically necessary"  care are often overly restrictive or not transparent. 

 

Pixabay

Police, firefighters, and emergency personnel have specific stressors in their daily jobs that can lead to long-term mental health impacts. We look at how the profession and our state are trying to improve its understanding, and response, to PTSD in this workforce.

Laid-Back Hiking

Apr 22, 2019

With temperatures warming up, you may be itching to get outside. But where to go and how to get started - especially with kids? New Hampshire is blessed with plenty of hiking trails, especially in the White Mountains, as well as networks of trails around its cities and towns. We discover favorite trails and uncover some new discoveries, and discuss how to keep it fun for everyone involved.

U.S. Air Force

The Exchange is working on a series of shows about workforce shortages in New Hampshire. New Hampshire boasts one of the nation’s lowest unemployment rates, but the state is also facing a serious workforce shortage.

The Exchange will spend several shows exploring how we got here, the sectors and regions most affected, and discussing possible solutions.

Ali Oshinskie/NHPR

 

Like every 2020 Presidential Candidate, Marianne Williamson has her policy positions on the issues. But Williamson argues her ideas present what she calls a “fierce and authentic” conversation, unheard elsewhere in the crowded Democratic field.  

In an interview on The Exchange, Williamson described her approach, while painting an image of an America traumatized by economic distress and spiritual malfunction. She suggested that her status as a political outsider, along with her work helping people seeking transformation, make her the best-suited candidate for the country at this time. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 19, 2019

Apr 18, 2019

We find out how Granite Staters are reacting to the release of the Mueller report, and how it is playing out on the campaign trail with 2020 candidates. Secretary of State Bill Gardner urges lawmakers to go slow when it comes to undoing voting laws enacted by the last Legislature. And the Senate backs a bipartisan plan to expand net energy metering in New Hampshire by a veto-proof margin. 

The Exchange, New Hampshire Public Radio’s daily news talk show, will host a live discussion about how our state funds education, and the challenges of providing adequate aid for local school districts across the state. Host Laura Knoy will be joined by a panel of experts in NHPR’s Studio D on Tuesday evening, April 30 for a live community discussion.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

On Friday, April 26, The Exchange will interview Republican Bill Weld, the former Massachusetts Governor, who is running against President Trump in the Republican Presidential Primary in 2020. Submit your questions for Weld below.

Weld is the former Governor of Massachusetts, serving from 1991 to 1997, and he was the Libertarian Party's nominee for Vice President in the 2016 with Gary Johnson. 

2020 Candidate Conversation: Marianne Williamson

Apr 16, 2019
Ali Oshinskie/NHPR

Marianne Williamson's campaign is based on some of the same themes that brought her acclaim and finanicial success for the past 30 years. She is calling for a "moral and spiritual awakening" in this country. The best-selling author and lecturer on such topics as spirituality and miracles is calling for a new American revolution, a "politics of love." We'll ask Marianne Williamson what that means in terms of policy, including health care, immigration, education.  

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In 2008, Congress passed the landmark Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, considered a major achievement in expanding access to care for mental illness and substance abuse. Ten years later, advocates say there has been progress in addressing some of the more obvious barriers to treatment but disparities remain -- including reimbursement for mental health care providers. Also, in some cases, state oversight has been lacking. We'll look at the situation in New Hampshire. 

In her new book, Under The Starry Flag, Lucy Salyer tells the story of a group of 40 Irish Americans who sailed to Ireland in 1867 to join the effort to end British rule. But the men, many of whom had fought in the American Civil War, were arrested by British authorities for treason as soon as they landed.  Their arrests sparked an international conflict that brought the United States and Britain to the brink of war. The legal saga, a prelude to today's immigration battles,  dramatized the idea of citizenship as an inalienable right and provoked a human-rights revolution.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 12, 2019

Apr 12, 2019

The Democratic-led House passes its version of the state spending plan, with funding for the secure psychiatric unit restored.  A bill to repeal the death penalty in the state clears NH Senate with a veto-proof margin. N.H.'s 400 state legislators get paid $100 a year; we examine the conflicts of interest they sometimes encounter in this small state. And another Democrat jumps into the 2020 primary race.

GUESTS:

Sports Betting: On Track In New Hampshire?

Apr 10, 2019

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year allowed states to legalize gambling on sporting events. Now the Granite State appears poised to do so, with a House bill advancing through the legislature.  We look at the details of this proposal, which include allowing betting at 10 locations and mobile betting, as well as concerns around addiction and what some consider to be "government-sanctioned" gambling. 

Political Partisanship in the N.H. Legislature

Apr 9, 2019

  George Washington, in his farewell address in 1796, warned about partisanship in political parties, and in years since, politicians have cautioned against a “partisan apocalypse." We look at whether partisanship is increasing in the New Hampshire legislature, and what highly partisan moments, and moments of party unity, in our state history say about our political climate.

We're discussing two articles from Citizens Count, a nonpartisan nonprofit in N.H., that analyzed partisanship in the N.H. Legislature over the years. Read them here and here.

We discuss life on the vertical with Mark Synnott, elite climber and author of "The Impossible Climb: Alex Honnold, El Capitan, and the Climbing Life."  The book describes Synnott's personal climbing history, beginning with his early days at Cathedral Ledge in N.H., and documents the preparation involved in Alex Honnold's historic free solo climb of Yosemite's El Capitan. 

Accidental Presidents: Eight Men Who Shaped America

Apr 5, 2019

We talk with Jared Cohen, the author of "Accidental Presidents: Eight Men Who Changed America." From the unready to the unexpectedly capable, we discuss the impact of vice presidents who have, on the death of a president, filled the highest office. The framers of the constitution left the question of succession largely unanswered, and the vice president was often chosen out of political necessity or to court a constituency. "Accidental Presidents" suggests it's time we pay more attention to this office.

It's budget season in the legislature -- and the construction of a secure psychiatric unit, a major part of the state’s new ten-year mental health plan, is at the center of a partisan tussle. Also, the state fined real estate developer Brady Sullivan half a million dollars for breaking environmental regulations. And presidential candidates: who’s here this weekend and who’s emerging from the crowded field.

Jim Richman/Flickr

Climate change is a hot topic on Capitol Hill and on the 2020 presidential campaign trail. And it is mobilizing younger Americans: children suing the federal government, grassroots campaigns pushing for the Green New Deal, and student-led walkouts. 

As the legislature weighs net-metering and offshore wind, we talk with young New Hampshire leaders about the state's climate future. 

Ali Oshinskie/NHPR

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As part of NHPR's Crossroad: The N.H. Opioid Reporting Project, The Exchange went on the road on February 7, 2019 to the Nashua Public Library for a live discussion on how the city is taking a multi-pronged approach to tackle the opioid crisis. 

This discussion was recorded at the Nashua Public Library on February 7th, and an edited version of the conversation originally aired on Thursday, February 14th.

The conversation is also available below. Click here to find the full, unedited discussion

Allegra Boverman/New Hampshire Public Radio

U.S. Sen. Maggie Hassan joins The Exchange on Monday to discuss national security, health care, and education. We also get her take on the Democratic candidates in the 2020 presidential race and on proposals such as the Green New Deal and Medicare-for-all. 

Hassan serves on the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee; the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee; the Finance Committee; and the Joint Economic Committee. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 29, 2019

Mar 28, 2019

The battle to abolish the death penalty advances to the state senate. Governor Sununu sends stronger signal that he may run for the Senate next year, boosted by polls suggesting he may have a chance at defeating Senator Shaheen. And we look how several national issues may affect the state, including a federal court ruling on Medicaid work requirements, and a multi-million dollar settlement against Purdue Pharma, maker of Oxycontin.  Dean Spiliotes is guest host.


Ali Oshinskie / NHPR

Former three-term Maryland Congressman John Delaney announced his run for the Democratic nomination in July 2017, the earliest of any candidate--a move seen as unusual even as candidates trend toward announcing earlier. Delaney casts himself as a moderate and says if elected he would sign only bipartisan legislation in his first 100 days as President.  He has said he will focus on what he believes matters to most Americans: jobs, wages, and opportunities for their children. 

 

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

Two gun-related topics debated in the legislature recently raised longstanding, familiar arguments.  But with Democrats in power at the Statehouse, these bills have advanced. Meanwhile, Governor Sununu has said the state's gun laws are fine as is, so their future is uncertain even if they make it through the Senate. Activists on both sides of this issue are also watching the national debate, with the U.S. House of Representatives recently passing the first major gun-control bills in decades. 

This show discusses suicide in the context of gun violence. Scroll down for resources. 

Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers On Top D.H.H.S. Issues

Mar 26, 2019

We sit down with Department of Health and Human Services Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers. The Department of Health and Human Services is the largest state agency and accounts for approximately forty percent of the state budget. We discuss the state's ten-year mental health plan, as well as recent challenges to medicaid work requirements.  And we get an update on the state's hub and spoke system for addiction treatment, and concerns about the Division of Children, Youth and Families. 

GUEST:

Jeffrey Meyers - Appointed in 2016, Meyers is Commissioner of the N.H. Department of Health and Human Services. 

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The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act passed December 22, 2017, and while parts of it went into effect immediately, 2018 was the first full calendar year under the new tax code. So this spring, American taxpayers will get their first look at how the new legislation impacted their refunds. 

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Former U.S. Rep. John Delaney is among 15 —by latest count— Democrats running for President.

Delaney was the first Democrat to announce a bid for the party's nomination; he wrote an op-ed for the Washington Post in July 2017 declaring his intention to run.

Ted Kitchens came to New Hampshire last fall, after serving as manager at Houston Intercontinental Airport.  We'll hear his ideas on how to boost passenger traffic in Manchester, which has declined for the past thirteen years, and the unique challenges of regional airports, and issues facing the aviation industry at large. 

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