All Things Considered | New Hampshire Public Radio

All Things Considered

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted by Michel Martin.

Every weekday, local host, Peter Biello, and national hosts present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features from NHPR and NPR.

Do you love a great story?

Try Daniel Nayeri's new autobiographical novel, his first, Everything Sad is Untrue (A True Story), which begins with these memorable words: "All Persians are liars and lying is a sin."

That's what the kids in Mrs. Miller's class think, but I'm the only Persian they've ever met, so I don't know where they got that idea.

My mom says it's true, but only because everyone has sinned and needs God to save them. My dad says it isn't. Persians aren't liars. They're poets, which is worse.

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Seattle's first Black female police chief will, within hours, be out of the job. Carmen Best announced her resignation in August just after Seattle's City Council announced cuts to the police department in the wake of protests, in part, aimed at police misconduct. Among other things, those cuts would eliminate the jobs of about a hundred officers, including, possibly, a young Black recruit who had emailed Chief Best this summer to share how ecstatic he was to work under her command.

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Seattle's first Black female police chief will, within hours, be out of the job. Carmen Best announced her resignation in August just after Seattle's City Council announced cuts to the police department in the wake of protests, in part, aimed at police misconduct. Among other things, those cuts would eliminate the jobs of about a hundred officers, including, possibly, a young Black recruit who had emailed Chief Best this summer to share how ecstatic he was to work under her command.

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Seattle's first Black female police chief will, within hours, be out of the job. Carmen Best announced her resignation in August just after Seattle's City Council announced cuts to the police department in the wake of protests, in part, aimed at police misconduct. Among other things, those cuts would eliminate the jobs of about a hundred officers, including, possibly, a young Black recruit who had emailed Chief Best this summer to share how ecstatic he was to work under her command.

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Last week's Republican National Convention offered direct appeals to a new generation of voters. It showcased figures like Madison Cawthorn, a congressional candidate in North Carolina.

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President Trump visited Wisconsin on Tuesday despite calls from officials, including Gov. Tony Evers and Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes, to stay away.

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The man who inspired the Hollywood film "Hotel Rwanda" has been arrested. Rwandan authorities have charged him with murder and terrorism. NPR's Eyder Peralta reports.

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Gyms shut down quickly when the U.S. coronavirus outbreak began. The rationale was clear. People exercising indoors and breathing heavily could easily spread the virus. But as NPR's Will Stone reports, gyms are now pushing back.

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In front of City Hall, a crew shovels through debris, clearing a path to the front door. Bricks and broken glass from office buildings litter downtown. Gas station awnings have been flipped on their sides.

The best news in Lake Charles, La., in recent days: an announcement that 95% of the streets here are just now navigable, nearly a week after Hurricane Laura tore through the region.

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Joe Biden says he is the candidate of safety and security while President Trump sows chaos and division.

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JOE BIDEN: He can't stop the violence because for years, he's fomented it.

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You know how scientists are always curious? Well, one scientist started wondering if bats do something that humans do.

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Starting tomorrow, some workers may get a boost in their take-home pay. That's because the Trump administration has given employers the option to stop collecting payroll taxes through the end of this year. The windfall is only temporary, though. Unless Congress decides to forgive the taxes, employees will have to repay the money next year. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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