Listen To The PSAs Made By Fifth Graders About The Importance Of Voting | New Hampshire Public Radio

Listen To The PSAs Made By Fifth Graders About The Importance Of Voting

Oct 30, 2020

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They may not be old enough to vote, but a group of fifth-grade students in Keene, New Hampshire is making the case for why you should cast your ballot in the Nov. 3 election.

The students at Fuller Elementary School recorded a series of public service announcements about the importance of voting. The PSAs also included information about how to register, and that absentee voting has been expanded to everyone this year due to COVID-19.

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NHPR collaborated with teacher JJ Prior to air the PSAs on Morning Edition the week of Oct. 26.

Prior says the lesson for students was centered around the centennial of the 19th amendment passing, giving women the right to vote. He said he wanted students to understand the right to participate in their country's democracy hasn't always been accessible to everyone.

"My hope is that by learning how hard people fought to secure this right, these future voters won't take their opportunities for granted," Prior said. "And as for sharing their messages today, my students want to remind those of voting age that their present and future world is in your hands. They won't be able to exercise their right to vote for eight more years so, until then, please do your part on their behalf."

You can listen to some of the PSAs the students recorded below: 

Grace:

"Hi I'm Grace Perkins, and I think voting is how you have a say in how your state and country runs. Many people fought for the right to vote and people should continue to think it's important today. Throughout our country's history, many people fought long and hard for their voices to be heard through the right to vote. I hope you make a difference and vote today."

Declan:

"Hola! Bonjour! Hello! My name is Declan and I'm here to tell you about voting. Any voter in New Hampshire who's concerned about COVID-19 can request an absentee ballot for the election. The state changed the rules so people may vote early to keep from spreading illness at the polls on election day. Here are some reasons why I think you should vote: voting gets politicians' attention most of the time. If you don't vote, you're not doing your responsibilities. I hope you will vote next month and every election. Goodbye and thank you for listening."

Delilah:

"Hi, good day. My name is Delilah and I'm here to tell you every vote counts. One year, the election in New Hampshire for U.S. Senate was decided by only two votes. Politicians pay attention to young people and what they care about when they can vote. Voting affects the laws that aren't fair that the country makes, and the way the country uses money, the way the country uses resources that are natural. This has been Delilah with voting; have a good day and please vote in our next election. Thank you."

Oliver:

"Hi. My name is Oliver and I have some important news. Elections are about choosing more than just the president; we're voting for senators and representatives, the people who actually make laws for New Hampshire and our country. Voting is a way of expressing who you think is a good leader. What leader people prefer and the choices that leader makes is a good reason to vote for them. In order to vote, you have to register. In every New Hampshire election, you can register to vote before the election or in person at the polls on election day. Please vote on Nov. 3, 2020."

Scarlett: 

"Hello, my name is Scarlett. I'm here to talk about the election coming soon. Voting is how people show their thoughts. Many people fought for the right to vote, and people should continue to think it's important today. Throughout our country's history, many people fought long and hard for their voices to be heard through the right to vote. In order to vote, you have to register. In every New Hampshire election, you can register vote before the election or in person at the polls on election day. That's what I think about voting and the election."